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An Evening with the Stars – and YOU Can Be There!

February 24, 2012 1 comment

We don’t know about you, but we have Awards fever! The Chicagoland Chapter of Autism Speaks is hosting an awesome event, ‘An Evening With the Stars.’ Unfortunately we can’t all physically be there, but you can VIRTUALLY be there! Throughout the night we will be giving updates on Facebook, Twitter, and our newly created Tumblr account! Please be sure to follow along and have some fun this Sunday!

Coverage starts at 6pm EST – so be there!!

Categories: Awareness, Fundraising

Weekly Whirl – Sibling Love!

February 24, 2012 1 comment

If anyone knows how hectic life can get – WE DO! That’s why we have created the Autism Speaks Weekly Whirl to fill you in on all of the highlights of the week! The last thing we want is for you to be left out of the loop! Please share with friends and family to spread the word about all of the exciting things going on in the autism community. Keep in mind, these updates aren’t limited to Autism Speaks — we will be featuring news from across the community.

We know how hard it is to balance the needs of all of your children and to celebrate each of them individually! Well for our Whirl we want to honor our siblings and share some of our favorite posts! We would also like to share a guide created by our Family Services Team – A Sibling’s Guide to Autism

The Covenant – Diary of a Mom

Treasure What You Have – Lena Rivkin

Voices of Autism: A Brother’s Perspective – Andy Shumaker

I’m Moving Out – Ali Dyer

Autism, Siblings, and the Art of Unconditional Love: An Interview With Lindsey Nebeker

Categories: Why I Walk Tags: ,

Autism in the News – 02.24.12

February 24, 2012 1 comment

Change in definition of ‘autism’ has parents worried they’ll lose critical services (Hartford, Conn.)
When Caleb Geary was diagnosed with autism at age 3, he had never spoken or eaten solid food. Read more.

Autism Is Jim Calhoun’s Biggest Opponent (Hartford Courant)
Jim Calhoun, like many coaches, is superstitious. He might have a lucky tie or piece of jewelry he must wear to end a losing streak, or keep a winning streak going. Read more.

Boy’s art graces book on autism (Indy Star)
Noblesville Griffin Nickels, 15, is a freshman at Noblesville High School. He is autistic. He is also artistic. Read more. 

Autism Clean-Up Bill Passes House of Delegates (The State Journal)
Parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder can breathe a little easier now that the West Virginia House of Delegates has passed a bill regarding insurance coverage for those children. Read more. 

Basic police work ignored in autistic patient’s suspicious death (News10)
Six days before he died, Van Ingraham was found on the floor of his room. His neck was broken and his spinal cord was crushed and disfigured. The injury was so severe, medical experts said it looked like he’d been put in a headlock or hanged. Read more. 

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.

Categories: Autism in the News Tags: ,

Autism – 2.23.12

February 23, 2012 Leave a comment

All mental health disorders should get insurance coverage, not just autism, coalition says (Lansing, Mich.)
Legislation that would require insurers to cover autism treatments unfairly singles out one condition, says a coalition that wants coverage for all mental health issues. Read more.

‘Growing out of autism’ claim unfounded (Littlehampton Gazette)
Can some children simply “grow out” of autism? The Daily Mail certainly thinks so, and today reported that new research by a “prestigious American university” claims that “not only is this possible, it’s also common.” Read more.

Bill would require insurance coverage for autism (NECN)
The Alaska Senate has passed a bill requiring insurance coverage for autism spectrum disorders. Read more.

Sally Bercow: ‘My son has autism, and I’m very proud of him’ – video (UK)
Labour activist Sally Bercow talks to disability campaigner Nicola Clark about her eldest child Oliver, who’s autistic. She tells of how she found out about her son’s condition and how it has affected her life, and why she supports TreeHouse school in north London, Ambitious About Autism’s flagship project that educates autistic children. Read more. 

Manchin visits Autism Training Center (The Parthenon)
United States Senator Joe Manchin visited the Autism Training Center on Tuesday at Marshall University. The Autism Training Center at Marshall provides students who are underneath the autism spectrum with support in academic and social situations. It serves individuals at Marshall and at statewide level. Read more.

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.

Categories: Autism in the News Tags: ,

Lorri Unumb to Host “My Child Has Autism: How Do I Get Insurance?” Webchat

February 22, 2012 19 comments

Please join us Monday February 27th for our first webchat featuring the Government Relations team: “My Child Has Autism: How Do I Get Insurance?” The webchat will be hosted by Lorri Unumb, Esq., our Vice President for State Government Affairs.

Held at 8 p.m. Eastern (7 Central/6 Mountain/5 Pacific), this “office hour” will connect families looking for answers about their health insurance with Ms. Unumb, who is regarded as one of the nation’s pre-eminent experts on health insurance and coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of autism. Ms. Unumb wrote groundbreaking autism insurance reform legislation enacted in her home state of South Carolina in 2007 and has since led the way for the enactment of similar laws in 27 other states. Her most recent honor was the 2012 Leadership in Advocacy Award presented by the California Association for Behavior Analysis.

Ms. Unumb welcomes your questions about how autism insurance coverage works in your state, understanding self-insured policies and the impact of the new federal health care law on autism coverage. However, the guidance provided on the webchat is not meant to substitute for the information provided by your employer’s human resources department, your insurance agent or attorney.

Autism Speaks Kicks off “Light It Up Blue”

February 22, 2012 23 comments

In celebration of World Autism Awareness Day on April 2, Autism Speaks will again seek to turn the world blue. Our third annual Light It Up Blue initiative is fully underway with over 350 buildings already committed to turning blue.

Among the landmarks that will be turning blue on April 2, 2012 are Rockefeller Center, Top of the Rock Observation Deck and Madison Square Garden in New York City, Hôtel de Ville in Paris, France, the famous Tokyo Tower in Japan and Canada’s CN Tower, the Sydney Opera House in Australia and Michigan’s Mackinac Bridge.

Check out LightItUpBlue.org to register your events and see a full list of participating buildings.

Last year we had over 2000 buildings and landmarks turn blue. With your help, in 2012 we will more than double that number!!

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Autism in the News – 2.22.12

February 22, 2012 Leave a comment

Expression and Attention in Shriver Center Autism Research Studies (Disability Info)
Over the past month in our 4-part series “Getting Involved in Shriver Center Research,” a common theme has emerged — the notion of “giving back.”  For Joyce, the mother of a 16-year-old daughter with Asperger Syndrome (AS), giving back influenced her decision to enroll her daughter in “Express Yourself” (EY) and “Look Who’s Talking” (LWT), two studies on expression and attention in teens with AS and high functioning autism (HFA). In addition, the “Detection Study” and “Focus of Attention” are two more great studies that explore attention and autism in children and teens. Read more.

Autism Detection Is Delayed in Minorities (Psych Central)
A new study suggests the symptoms of autism in toddlers from a minority background are more significant than those noted in age-equivalent Caucasian children. Read more.

Autism Awareness art show to feature talent, provide resources (Iowa City, Iowa)
Lisa Burns’ son, Peyton, has hundreds of characteristics. He funny, he’s sweet. He’s silly, he’s naughty. “He’s all of these things, but the minute you say ‘autism,’ that’s all people see,” Burns says. Read more.

Parents of autistic children give the thumbs-up to new course (Halifax Courier)
Parents of children with autism were given a helping hand on an innovative new course in Calderdale. Read more. 

Police question brother in shooting of autistic boy, 14 (Chicago Sun-Times)
A 14-year-old boy was shot to death on the South Side Tuesday afternoon, and investigators were questioning one of his brothers, police said. Read more. 

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.

Categories: Autism in the News Tags: ,

Dr. Beth Ann Malow, MD, Sleep Chat Transcript

February 21, 2012 6 comments

12:50
Hi Everyone! We are going to begin in about 10 minutes!
12:53
Thank you SO much for joining us. After the chat, we’ll be posting the transcript on the Autism Speaks science blog:http://blog.autismspeaks.org/category/science/
12:55
Comment From Kristie Vick

thank you for this!

12:57
Our hosts today are Dr. Beth Ann Malow, M.D., of Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and ATN Program Director Nancy Jones, Ph.D.,
12:58
Comment From Ana

Is there any thing like maybe a foutain or something with nature sounds that can help them to sleep?

12:58
Hi Ana, This is Dr. Malow. Great question. I often recommend white noise machines or sounds of nature as they can help adults and children on the spectrum go to sleep. It works by distracting people so they don’t focus on not sleeping. A fan can also be effective.
1:01
Comment From myra

hi, my daugter age 10 has always had her days and nights flipped, recently her MT suggested melatonin ,her family doctor ok’d it to try and it does work wonders for her. My question though is this – I worry about long term use and are there other methods to help her besides melatonin? And yes we tried baths, lavender, rubbing, and most of all the other normal sleep helps? thank you.

1:02
Hi Myra– This is Dr. Malow. I am glad the melatonin is working. It is generally safe long term, although I would recommend that you look at our Sleep Booklet (you can find a link here) which has basic sleep tips for children with autism spectrum disorders. You may find some strategies there that help your child sleep.
1:06
Comment From Lise

I have a daughter who has been diagnosed with sleep apnea. We have a lot of trouble getting her to use her CPAP machine regularly. Any suggestions? She is thirteen, verbal and is not quite high functioning, but does well overall.

1:07
CPAP treatment for sleep apnea really works and the good news is that you will likely see lots of benefits once Lise is using the machine regularly, including sleeping soundly at night and being more alert during the day. To get used to CPAP, a respiratory therapist or sleep technologist can be key to success. They can help you and Lise get acclimated to the machine. I would ask your sleep specialist who diagnosed Lise if there is anyone at the sleep center who could help with this.
1:07
Hi all,
You won’t see questions post until they are selected to be answered. We’ll try to get to as many as we can. Thanks.
1:08
Comment From marie fauth

do you know what are the scientific research about sleep disorders and autism ?

1:10
Dear Marie– There is a lot of exciting scientific research going on about sleep disorders and autism! We are looking at medical causes that interfere with sleep, such as GI issues and anxiety, as well as brain chemicals that affect sleep, such as melatonin. We are also looking at issues specific to those with autism– increased sensitivities to noise and touch, difficulty understanding parents expectations about sleep. All of these causes can be addressed. Be sure to seek advice from your pediatrician who may likely refer you to a sleep specialist or autism specialist.
1:12
Comment From dee

my 6 yr old as been precribed 3mg melatonin an 3 mg m/r melatonin but it wears of at two so she is a asleep from 7 till 2 its really starting to wear me down as she i have two other children to an non of us are sleeping an i really need some help with it as iv been fighting for two years an all they do is keep changing her sleeping tablets :o(

1:13
Dear Dee– I would ask your pediatrician for a referral to a sleep specialist who is comfortable with children on the spectrum. There are lots of things to try. The first thing I would want to be sure of is that there isn’t a medical reason why your child is waking up at 2– GI issues, breathing problems, etc. Also, there are some behavioral strategies that can be tried to return your child to sleep– some are in the sleep toolkit. The important thing to remember is that there are lots of things to try– you just need to get under the care of someone who is familiar with sleep problems in autism.
1:16
Comment From Sebree

My son is 16 and up until he reached puberty, we had no problems getting him to sleep in his own bed. He now falls asleep on the couch and when we go to bed he ends up on our bedroom floor. He is a very light sleeper and wakes up immediately if we wake up. We give him melatonin, which seems to relax him at first and get him in the sleep zone, but once he wakes up in the middle of the night, he is up all night. Today, we are going to try to get him active outdoors, since he doesn’t do anything physical.

1:17
Dear Sebree– Puberty and adolescence can definitely be a challenging time for sleep! You are absolutely correct to try to increase his daytime activity, as exercise can make a big difference. Also be sure he isn’t using caffeine especially in the afternoon and evening. You might also want to try controlled release melatonin (comes in a pill as the coating is what makes it controlled release– so he will need to be able to swallow pills). We are working on a sleep brochure for teens that will be released in the future.
1:19
Comment From Maritza:
Hi Dr. Malow, Is prolong use of Melantonin harmful? If so, what is best to use. My 18 year old son (preparing to go away to college) averages six to six and a half hours of sleep. Also, if Melantonin is OK to use – What is the best brand? Thanking you, Maritza
1:20
Hi Maritza. This is Dr. Malow. Melatonin is generally not harmful if you use a reputable brand, however, it is important to seek the assistance of a sleep specialist or pediatrician with experience in sleep. This is to be sure that there aren’t any medical issues contributing to difficulty sleeping. Also, keep in mind that melatonin helps with falling asleep quicker but doesn’t help as much with how many hours of sleep a person gets. We used Natrol brand melatonin in our clinical trial as it was approved by the FDA for this study, although there are other reputable brands out there.
1:20
Comment From Guest

My son is 13 years old and sometimes does not go to sleep for up to 4 days at a time. I have caught him watching tv and playing video games. His school calls and says he is sick he is white as a bed sheet…. What do I need to do?

1:21
This is a great question and several others have asked questions about TV/’video games as well–so I am hopefully addressing lots of others with this question. It is important to realize that TV/video games can be extremely stimulating– not just the content but also the flickering lights, which interfere with our natural levels of melatonin. I recommend turning the TV/video games/phones/etc off at least one hour before bedtime and making sure individuals engage in non-stimulating/relaxing activities before bed. Getting your son to understand this may be challenging– this is where your pediatrician may be able to help. If removing the electronics doesn’t help, ask for a referral to a sleep specialist.
1:22
To all-in addition to the Sleep Toolkit, you can also check out a recent blog on Sleep that provides information about sleep management.Toolkit
http://www.autismspeaks.org/science/resources-programs/autism-treatment-network/tools-you-can-use Blog on sleep management
http://blog.autismspeaks.org/2012/02/17/my-son-has-sleep-problems-what-can-help/
1:23
Comment From Wyayn

I work at a Transition program with students 18-21. We help students with autism learn work, independent living, and post-secondary skills. Many of our students come to school very sleepy. We spend much of our day talking about alerting strategies to help them stay awake. Parents report to us they have difficulty sleeping at night. How would you recommend we work with parents to help them sleep at night so they can be awake during the day and focused on school?

1:24
Dear Wyayn– it is terrific that you want to be proactive with these parents and that they are in close communication with you! I would suggest you set up a workshop where you can bring in a sleep specialist to work with the parents for a day and provide information on how to help their children sleep. You may also want to engage the students in the workshop as well as they will feel empowered and engaged in the process.
1:27
Comment From Amanda

My son is on remeron at night which we switch up tp clonidine I worry about him getting addicted to the point where he won’t sleep without meds So I some times switch he over to melatonin. If he has no meds he with stay with just as much energy as if he just woke up other times the meds make him relaxed but he still stays up till around 2-4am Are theses medx going to be something he has to take forever he is 7 now and has been on and off them since he was 5

1:28
Dear Amanda– Excellent question. I would recommend you go back to basics and work with a child sleep specialist to try to identify the cause of your son’s problems with sleep. See previous answer about the scientific causes of sleep problems in autism– medical, biological, behavioral. Once the cause is identified, the most appropriate treatment can be prescribed rather than just trying a bunch of different meds.
1:29
Comment From Christy Guitard

My daughter is 5 and has autism. She has had sleep problems since a very young age. After trying many methods, her doctor recently started her on clonidine, and we found that 0.15mg (a tab and a half) helps her sleep from about 7:30pm-6am on most nights. Some nights she still awakens around 2 or 3, but these are rare. We have not noticed any side effects and she has been taking this dose for about 4 months now. As she grows, is it likely she will become more tolerant to the drug? Also, are there long term side effects you have seen in kids on the spectrum that take this drug? Thank you!

1:30
Dear Christy- It is great to hear that your daughter is sleeping well on clonidine and not having any side effects. As she gets older, the dose may need to be increased. I have not seen any long term side effects but I have occasionally seen this medication and others to stop working, so I would recommend that you look at the sleep toolkit and start trying those strategies.
1:32
Comment From Elizabeth Mills

We r n the process of getting on with the agency for persons with disability because the JDC has ordered our 17 asperger’s son 2 be place n residencial care 2 help him now get 24 hr help & conseling n the many problem areas he has hopefully before turning 18. Do u have any advice? This is all so new 2 us

1:33
To Elizabeth and others-While the focus on our webchat today is on sleep, the Autism Response Team members from our Family Services department can provide information on services and other resources.
1:34
Every Wednesday at 3pm EST Family Services Office Hours is held! Office Hours is designed to quickly provide access to resources that are available and free to the entire autism community.
1:35
Comment From Chris

Do you have any strategies on getting a 6 year old to sleep in his own bed? He has always slept with his mother and when we have tried to put him in his bed at night he wakes up immediately and will usually not go back to bed. If he wakes up at night I will try to take him out of the bed so my wife can get some sleep but he will just have a complete meltdown and nobody gets any sleep. He is given melatonin and Zertec, which helps him fall asleep. He will not take any other type of medicine that cannot be hidden in a cup of milk.

1:36
Dear Chris– Lots of parents would like to help their children learn to fall asleep in their own beds so your question is very relevant! If your son can learn to fall asleep on his own, he will likely be able to stay asleep in the middle of the night or be able to go back to sleep easier. To help him learn to fall asleep on his own, I would start by finding a book for your child to read about learning how to sleep in his own bed (there are several out there — “I want to sleep in your bed” by Harriet Ziefert is one) . It helps to start out by having mom sleep in a mattress right next to your son, and then move it a few inches away each night until they are sleeping in separate spaces. Be sure to couple this with a reward program for your son.
1:37
Also, please join us on March 1st at 3pm EST for ‘The Doctors Are In!’ Hosting will be, Head of Medical Research Joseph Horrigan, M.D. and Dr. Jose Polido, a dentist with at the ATN center in Los Angeles!
1:40
Comment From Mel

How can I find a child sleep specialist? (Our pediatrician does not seem to have any recommendation.) It also seems a little excessive for my son’s situation… he is a very restless sleeper and wakes in the morning not feeling rested; but he is not as extreme as others have described, as far as being up for hours. Melatonin helps, but not all night.

1:42
Dear Mel– Below is the info on how to find a accredited sleep center which has pediatric sleep specialists. You can also look at the Autism Treatment Network website as each of these 17 sites across North America has a pediatric sleep specialist with autism experience involved.
1:44
Comment From Helena

Hello, my son is 32 years old and he started having seizures 8 years ago. He has problems falling a sleep. He will lay down but wont be sleep. This can go on for a two til three days then he will have a seizure. Do you have information on a doctor that specializes in adult autism in pennsylvania

1:46
Helena-Dr. Jones here. Our ATN center at University of Pittsburgh, may be able to help find you a recommendation for a doctor in Pennsylvania who works with adults. You can contact them at (412) 235-5412. You can also contact our ART team.
1:47
Comment From Angela

what about adults and children with ADD/ADHD and sleep i am now adult with moderate ADD mild ADHD i struggle sleep since i was baby i have troubles falling asleep my mind wont shut off or stop thinking i would write my problems or thoughts down dont work i take malentonin

1:47
Dear Angela– ADD/ADHD, like autism spectrum disorders, is also associated with sleep problems. Be sure that any medication you are taking for ADD/ADHD isn’t too late in the day when it could be interfering with sleep, and also be sure there isn’t any other sleep problem going on at night, like a breathing problem. Your primary care physician can help with that. Writing your thoughts down is a great strategy– you might also try meditation or other relaxation techniques to help promote sleep.
1:48
Comment From Ana

We are about to move into a new place that has rooms for each of my two children. My son who is a aspie has to sleep with someone at all times or he wakes up and doesnt sleep. We are looking into getting a rescue dog that will maybe sleep with him in the bed, Do you think that this will help? Has there been any study on the dog/pet influence?

1:50
Dear Ana– I don’t know of any studies, but I think that a trained assisted dog is an excellent idea as it may help your son be less anxious at night. Anxiety is a big cause of sleep problems in kids with autism.
1:51
Advance question from Cathy:
Hi, My son is 6 ½ years old and has been diagnosed with ADHD and Asperger’s and shows symptoms of OCD, ODD, Anxiety, Sensory Integration Disorder. He takes a combination of Adderall XR 15mg, Adderall 30 mg, and Intunive 3 mg during the day. His day time hours at school are very good (finally!) but it’s the night time and first thing in the morning I struggle with the most. He has many meltdowns and tantrums, though he’s on a regular diet; blood test results have shown he’s got a higher gliadin level of 38. The medicines wear out of his body by 8:30pm usually, so he’s not on any medications until the next morning when I start his Adderall (XR and regular) again.
Once Daniel’s head hits the pillow, he usually falls asleep within minutes. Problem is, he’s up like 45 minutes later with night terrors. It’s terrifying because he sits in bed and just gives blood-curdling screams. When I go in to see what’s going on, he’ll start hitting, kicking, or punching me. I’ve heard that it’s best to leave him alone, but when I do that, the nightmare seems to last FOREVER. I’m a single working mom and need my sleep as much as he needs his!
What is the best way to handle his meltdowns/tantrums during the off-medicine times? What is the best way to handle his night terrors? Thanks
1:52
Hi Cathy. I would seek a referral to a pediatric sleep specialist as night terrors are very treatable, but must be properly diagnosed. We often will do a sleep study to document night terrors and exclude epileptic seizures. As for the meltdowns/tantrums, I would consult with an autism specialist, keeping in mind that improving sleep may also help these daytime symptoms.
1:52
Comment From Julie

Just joined, sorry i’m late. My 6 year old son has autism and tends to wake around 5 am. we really struggle getting him back to sleep. He is tired but isn’t understanding it’s still night time and bed time. any suggestions?

1:53
Dear Julie– In trying to help with early morning waking (5 am), it helps to figure out what time bedtime is. If bedtime is 8 am, you may want to see if your son can stay up a little later as that may help him sleep until 6 or 7 am. As he gets older, he may be able to entertain himself when he wakes up early. Kids with autism in general seem to need less sleep, so as long as it isn’t disruptive to the family, I wouldn’t be overly concerned.
1:55
Advance question from Richard
My son has trouble sleeping at night he gets up at least 2 or 3 times a night. But when he gets up he seems to be confused and kind of really knowing where he’s at. And the next morning he doesn’t remember even getting up! I was wondering if this is normal or does he have other issues than just having autism?
1:56
Hi Richard. This is Dr. Malow. I would be suspicious of confusional arousals (a form of sleep disorder similar to night terrors or sleepwalking) or possibly epileptic seizures. Would recommend seeking a referral to a pediatric sleep specialist.
1:57
Comment From Amanda

What is a sleep specialist and how do they identify problems?

1:57
Amanda– A sleep specialist is a physician who has been trained in sleep problems– it can be a neurologist, psychiatrist, pediatrician, or other specialist. Finding a sleep specialist who is trained in autism is challenging, but there are some excellent ones out there. Take a look at the link posted below for the Autism Treatment Network– each site has a pediatric sleep specialist with autism expertise.
1:59
Comment From Lisa

My 4 yr old granddaughter has a terrible time trying to fall asleep. She says shes afraid, she has terrible dreams, and sometimes will still be awake at 1-2am…She even is developing dark circles under her eyes because she isn’t sleeping. We’ve tried various things like bedtime stories, no TV for about 2 hours before bedtime, etc…Any suggestions?

2:00
Dear Lisa– Scary dreams can be really hard on a child! You are doing the right thing to try bedtime stories and limit TV before bedtime. Be sure she isn’t watching stimulating videos even earlier than 2 hours bedtime and that there aren’t any other stressors in her life. If not, you might want to talk with her pediatrician about whether she might have an anxiety disorder, which treatment can really help for.
2:01
Advance question from Lisa:
I have a non-verbal 8 year old son that has autism. He has been on clonidine for years but he still has a hard time staying asleep and he can have some “bad” days if he becomes too tired. Are there any new, safe alternatives that might help keep him asleep without causing him to be drowsy in the morning? He is learning to read, type and doing simple math, but these “bad” days seem interfere with his learning and his therapies, so I would really like to make sure he receives enough rest. Thank you guys for all you do for our children.
2:01
To Colleen-If you are asking about what early signs of autism are, I would suggest you check out our Learn the Signs page:Learn the Signs
http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/learn-signs Info on autism
http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism
2:02
Oops. Here’s the answer to the advance question from Lisa…. If he can swallow pills, I would recommend controlled release melatonin. If not, gabapentin may be a good alternative. Be sure that you seek medical advice, however, for a couple of reasons—1. To be sure there isn’t a medical reason (GI issues, etc) for the night wakings and 2. To be sure that whatever medication is chosen isn’t going to interfere with his other treatments. Also, be sure you review our new sleep booklet as we include some tips for night wakings.
2:03
Comment From Linda

I suspect my grandson has autism. Any tips on how to approach my son with this?

2:03
To Linda. Dr. Jones here. We have a Grandparents Guide to Autism you may find useful. The link to this document will follow.You may also find these webpages helpful. They have information on the early sigsns of autism.Learn the Signs
http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/learn-signs Info on autism
http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism
2:04
Thank you all SO much for joining us. Sorry we couldn’t get to all your questions.
After the chat, we’ll be posting the transcript on the Autism Speaks science blog: http://blog.autismspeaks.org.
Got more questions? Please join us next Thursday (3 pm ET/noon PT) for “The Doctors are In” webchat with our head of medical research child psychiatrist Joe Horrigan and guest host dentist Jose Polida, who practices with our ATN center at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

Build-A-Bear Workshop Accepting Nominations for Huggable Heroes

February 21, 2012 2 comments

Build-A-Bear Workshop, one of our wonderful corporate sponsors, is accepting nominations for its ninth annual Huggable Heroes program that recognizes young heroes in local communities.

Nominations will be accepted through Feb. 27 throughout the country. Build-A-Bear is looking for kids who provide extraordinary service to their communities.

Candidates must be between the ages of eight and 18. Ten kids will be selected as Huggable Heroes and earn a trip to Build-A-Bear Workshop World Bearquarters in St. Louis.

Each Huggable Heroe also receives a $7,500 scholarship and $2,500 to donate to a charity of their choice.

To nominate someone for the Huggable Heroes program, go to buildabear.com/huggableheroes or pick up an entry form at Build-A-Bear Workshop stores.

Autism in the News – 02.21.12

February 21, 2012 Leave a comment

A Life With Autism: Summit Hill Junior High Student Expresses Himself Through His Art (Frankfort Patch)
Last week, we wrote about Mokena teen Alex Joss, whose art was recently featured as part of a larger children’s show in Frankfort. The Joss family—Jay, Laurel, Alex, 13, and Tyler, 9—let us meet with Alex for a quick snapshot of their lives. Read more.

Autistic students deserve the best of education (Canada)
I read with interest the article published by the Times (Feb. 16), “Parents, educators frustrated. Little accountability when it comes to autism.” Read more.

Taking a puppy away from an autistic girl (MyNorthWest.com)
Faith Creighton of Silverdale, Washington has a lot to deal with. The eight-year-old girl has mild Cerebral Palsy, Autism, multiple life-threatening allergies, left ventricle hardening of her heart, reduced kidney function, and Familial Mediterranean Fever Syndrome. Read more. 

Teen falls to death down trash chute in Gold Coast (Red Eye Chicago)
A 16-year-old boy with autism and Down syndrome fell to his death down a trash chute at a Gold Coast highrise, authorities said this morning. Read more. 

Arundel folk gives voice to Worthing mum’s loving message (UK)
Arundel folk club organiser Chris Davis is helping to stage a special concert, with a mother’s song for her autistic son certain to be among the highlights. Read more. 

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.

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