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The Day Joey Testified Before Congress

July 19, 2010 30 comments

This is a guest post by Sharon Rosenbloom. Sharon is a speech and language Pathologist, autism consultant, and author of the award winning book: Souls: Beneath and Beyond Autism. She is the mother of Joey Rosenbloom, a 22 year old with autism. Sharon and Joey, along with their family members Raia and Bob, are passionate advocates for individuals living with autism – especially those with limited access to communication.

On July 15, my son Joey climbed the steps of the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C. Watching him, it struck me that for a person with autism; this was not so much “The Hill” as yet another mountain to be climbed. To the casual observer, those steps looked deceptively easy.  But for Joey, a 22-year-old man with autism, the journey that brought him to Washington, D.C. with the honor of testifying as part of the Advancing Futures for Adults with Autism Congressional Briefing had been a long and arduous one. This was never more evident than as he ascended those steps. Only those of us who live in the world of autism can imagine the amount of effort it took for Joey to simply wear a suit, let alone develop the skills to access a voice, manage crippling anxiety and transcend the abyss from autism to the steps of this historical government building.

As both Joey’s anchor and rudder, I begged my eyes to stay dry and my heart to stop racing, in order to be the calm presence he needed as he viewed this audience of influence seated before him in The Kennedy Caucus Room. On every level of our senses, each of us at that table knew the importance of this unprecedented event: here sat the faces of adults with autism, each one representing a story of relentless effort and unwavering hope. Finally, beyond the statistics and symptoms, those given the label of autism were truly going to speak. I knew all too well that each panelist with autism had spent their entire life being judged for what the textbooks called “idiosyncratic” behaviors. Yet on this day, these remarkable individuals were being given an opportunity to represent the truth about what adults living with autism have the potential to be, and how the ceaseless love and energy poured onto them yielded extraordinary returns on that investment. As Joey fidgeted with the microphone, I was filled with profound respect for him that dropped a blanket of calm over the sharp edges of my apprehension. Overwhelmed by emotion, I took Joey’s hand, and he let me hold it. I found myself replacing that familiar anticipation of stinging public scrutiny with a prayer that those watching might see each panelist with the eyes of their hearts, listen with their minds wide open and ready themselves for paradigms to shift.

As the last thought was shared and the audience rose to their feet, filling the room with applause, I caught a glimpse of something I had never seen: pride, spreading like a smile across my son’s face. It was then I knew I had witnessed a milestone event which had lit a small candle of hope for Joey, and for all those labeled with autism: that by the miracle of human connection they might now be viewed, if for only those brief moments, through a truer lens.

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