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Posts Tagged ‘Advocate’

Autism America Radio New Line-Up

August 23, 2011 1 comment

Autism America Radio is back on Saturday with Special guests Producer and director Tricia Regan (Autism: The Musical) and educational attorney and special education advocate Valerie Vanaman!

Join hosts Matthew Asner and Andrea Nittoli for two hours of talk and interviews Saturdays 3-5PM on KTLK 1150 in Los Angeles.

Want to participate? Call in studio 877-827-1150!

The Show will also be streamed live at http://www.ktlkam1150.com/mediaplayer/ and podcast on iTunes!

Visit the Autism America Radio Facebook page here!

How To Compromise With Your School District Without Compromising Your Child

August 15, 2011 30 comments

Join us on August 17th at 7 pm EST as Gary Mayerson discusses parent advocacy and answers your questions about what you can do.

Navigating the IEP process can be an overwhelming experience. Join nationally renowned attorney Gary Mayerson as he answers live questions from parents and explains what parents can do to secure effective and appropriate programming.

Gary Mayerson is the founder of Mayerson & Associates, a law firm in Manhattan that was formed more than a decade ago as the very first law firm dedicated exclusively to serving people with autism. To date, Mr. Mayerson and other lawyers at his firm have helped more than 1,000 families in more than 30 states, as well as military families stationed abroad. He also is the author of How To Compromise With Your School District Without Compromising Your Child (DRL Books 2005). In addition, Mr. Mayerson is a long-time board member of Autism Speaks and serves as the Director of the Autism Speaks Federal Legal Appeals Project, a pro bono initiative at the federal level.

Advice for Asking Questions and Advocating for Your Child

December 30, 2010 4 comments

We are so thankful for the outpouring of advice that has flooded in for us to share with the Autism Speaks Community. Who better to give advice than you all, the people that know best! We have heard from people on the autism spectrum, parents, siblings, teachers, therapists, and beyond. Your advice has been broken down into categories, and we will post accordingly!

YOU are your child’s best advocate. YOU are their voice when they need it. YOU know your child best. It’s not about them; it’s about your child. –Marisa

The best advocator and educator for your child is you. So educate yourself on different forms of therapy and treatments. Find a great pediatrician. And learn to laugh and enjoy the journey, that little person needs you. And love them for who they are…an awesome child who just happens to have Autism. –Deanna

Believe – in yourself, in your child, and most of all in the bond you share. –Keith

Early Intervention is Key.  The sooner your child receives therapy, the better chances the child has to grow. Check out the public schools to find out which has the best special education program and do everything in your power to go to that school. –Caroline

People with Autism do not plateau in their learning abilities.  They will keep growing and learning with time, patience, and consistency. That is what I have found in my son. –Doreen

Know your school system and the services that are available for you and your child.  Fight for your child; do not let the school system bully you or your child.  Insist that your child be allowed to become the best that they can be. -Linda

Do NOT assume that school personnel know more than you do about your child or autism.  I am a special education teacher whose certification program only briefly covered children with autism.  There is no state teaching license, in Wisconsin, for the area of autism.  Visit your child’s school, unannounced, and observe the programming and interaction between students and staff, students and students.  Many times special education aides are the staff members responsible for your child’s day-to-day functioning.  Do not overlook them – they are a vital piece to your child’s success. –Sheryl

Remember, you’re not alone.  There are many untapped resources to help fund your child’s road to recovery.  Know your rights, and the rights of your child when looking for these State, Federal and School District funded programs. -Ian

Have lots of mirrors and practice social situations BEFORE you go.  One step beyond social stories…don’t script them…’improv’ any new situations and talk about possible feelings and reactions.  Practice making your body match your feelings AND practice hiding your feelings when necessary. –Mary

I got the best advice to embrace my son’s autism.  Never give up, and embrace it along the way. –Kristi

Stop trying to fix them, they aren’t broke. –Ruth

You will hear so many theories and receive so many suggestions about therapies that you MUST try. Proceed with an open mind. Proceed with caution. Look for objective evidence (data, proof) of claims that treatments are effective. But above all, do what works for your child and your family. –Kelley

I wish I’d known colic is not “normal.”  Although food intolerances are not the source of our son’s problems, having stomach aches and headaches certainly made it much more difficult for him to focus on our world.  If your baby/toddler has stomach problems or cries for “no reason”, have him/her checked for food intolerances, and if you are breast feeding, eliminate the major problem foods from your diet (milk and gluten are a good starting point) to see if it helps.  It may have a major effect on your child’s behavior. -Deniz

Be patient, go with the flow, seek the best therapy you can find, and love them through it all. –Sharon

Following the GF/CF diet has cleared up my son’s cloudiness….he became much more interactive with his environment and family.  It is important to be 100% all day every day to get results!  Set a time frame and gently ease into the diet so your child does not feel penalized, there are a lot of great recipes available and people to support you! Remember to keep carbohydrate intake low if you are GF/CF! –Dens

Don’t blame yourself. –Jon

Parenthood: Put Yourself Out There

November 17, 2010 6 comments

Parenthood is a one-hour drama that follows the trials and tribulations of the very large, very colorful and imperfect Braverman family. Jason Katims, the show’s Executive Producer, has been honored by Autism Speaks. Parenthood airs Tuesday night on NBC at 10/9c.

In this episode of Parenthood, Max, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, did not get invited to a classmate’s birthday party. Max is under the impression that he isn’t invited because Emily, his classmate, doesn’t like him. Kristina and Adam are upset and hurt to learn that their son is being excluded.

Kristina confronts Emily’s mom and is surprised to hear that it was a deliberate choice not to invite Max. Emily’s parents decided that because of all of her struggles, she should be able to have her birthday be a special day, just as she wants it. Kristina can’t handle the reasoning and speaks to Emily. Kristina learns that Emily thinks Max is a sore loser, when playing games.

After another run-in with Emily’s mom, Kristina pleads for a play date so that the children can work out their issues. Kristina says that she is Max’s biggest supporter and Andie agrees with those sentiments. Bother mothers realize that need to work together to support their Aspie children.

For a full synopsis of the episode and the “Experts Speak” section, visit the NBC website.

How much, is too much parental involvement? Have you ever been in Kristina’s situation? How did you handle it? What are some constructive ways you advocate for your child?

 

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