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Posts Tagged ‘Autism Talk TV’

Autism Talk TV – Ep. 18 – Interview with NBC’s Parenthood Cast

December 16, 2011 1 comment

Alex, from Autism Talk TV, got the exclusive at the Autism Walk in LA. He interviews the cast of NBC‘s hit show Parenthood, starring Peter Krause, Lauren Graham, Dax Shepard, and Monica Potter.

Max Braverman is an autistic character in the show. The creator, Jason Katims, has a son with Asperger’s/autism.  Alex talks with the cast about autism, acting, and NBC’s hit show Parenthood!

Autism Talk TV 17 – Shonda Schilling, Autism, and Fitness. Oh My!

November 8, 2011 1 comment

This post is by Alex Plank of  ‘Wrong Planet.’

This is the 2nd episode we filmed at the ASA conference in Orlando, FL. Alex interviewed Shonda Schilling about her new book, “The Best Kind of Different: Our Family’s Journey with Asperger’s Syndrome.” Jack talked with David Geslak about physical fitness and autism. Both Alex and Jack talked with Kerry Magro of Autism Speaks about his role as a social media consultant.

Autism Talk TV Ep. 14 – Be Different by John Elder Robison

July 19, 2011 7 comments

This post is by Alex Plank

In the latest installment of Autism Talk TV, Alex, Jack, and Kirsten talk about John Robison’s new book, Be Different: Adventures of a Free Range Aspergian. Be Different is must-read and I highly recomend ordering it on Amazon. John’s first book, an autobiography entitled Look Me in the Eye: My life with Asperger’s was an overnight success, landing itself on the New York Times bestseller list.

Unlike Look Me in the EyeBe Different is a how-to guide aimed at teachers, parents, professionals, and individuals on the spectrum. However, you won’t be disapointed if you are hoping to read more of John’s firsthand accounts that made up the entirety of Look Me in the Eye as John uses his famous stories to illustrate points in Be Different.

Teacher’s Guide for Look Me In the Eye

Look Me In the Eye Study Guide

Autism Talk TV – Episode 13

February 8, 2011 8 comments

This is a guest post by Alex Plank, an autistic adult who founded the online community Wrong Planet. Alex is a graduate of George Mason University.

Autism Talk TV is finally back from our extended holiday hiatus. This week we’re interviewing Bud Fraze, president of Playability Toys. We met Bud at the ASA conference in Dallas and instantly hit it off.

Bud shows us various toys he’s created for children with special needs. You’ll get to learn about a Buddy Dog, a Rib-it-Ball, and a Brain Gear. Playability Toys are designed to stimulate an autistic child’s sensory needs.

We originally wanted to include Bud’s interview in our famous toy episode, but decided he deserved his own show. Aspergian girl and production assistant Kirsten Lindsmith is guest hosting this episode with me. You may remember her from the original toy episode.

To watch this video on Wrong Planet visit here.

Sneak Preview of Robison’s New Book, “Be Different: Adventures of a Free-Range Aspergian”

January 31, 2011 11 comments

Autism Speaks Science Board member John Elder Robison, author of Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger’s, has a new book, Be Different: Adventured of a Free-Range Aspergian, that will be released in March. In this video, created by Alex Plank, John reads the introduction of Be Different, set to photos from his life.

For more information about Wrong Planet visit their site here.

 

 

Autism Talk TV – Episode 12

December 15, 2010 Leave a comment

This is a guest post by Alex Plank, an autistic adult who founded the online community Wrong Planet. Alex is a graduate of George Mason University.

Thanks for tuning in to the latest episode of Autism Talk in which we interview Elaine Hall, the founder of The Miracle Project in Los Angeles. Elaine worked in the film industry until she adopted an autistic son and decided to start the Miracle Project, a successful program in which autistic children sing and act and dance in order to promote learning and social interaction.

The Miracle Project is hosting a cruise for autistic children in June of 2011 which features music drama and dance. Stephen Shore will be on the boat teaching music to children.

Elaine and The Miracle Project were featured in the HBO documentary “Autism The Musical” and wrote a book about raising her autistic son entitled “now i see the moon.” Elaine generously granted us an interview in which she talks about her experience raising her deeply autistic son. In addition, Elaine explains The Miracle Project and her views about working with autistic children.

 

For more information on this episode, visit Wrong Planet.

Autism Talk TV – Episode 10

October 28, 2010 4 comments

This is a guest post by Alex Plank, an autistic adult who founded the online community Wrong Planet. Alex is a graduate of George Mason University.

In this 18 minute episode of Autism Talk TV I sit down with Lindsay Oberman at Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center to talk about TMS, a technology that allows researchers to use magnets to affect the brains of individuals with autism. First we have an interview with Lindsay and then you can watch me undergoing TMS.

Lindsay discusses the details of TMS and how it relates to autism. She has been interested in autism since she was a graduate student and clearly has a passion for finding out how autistic brains differ from neurotypical ones.

I was surprised that the TMS researchers were able to use a magnet to move my hand and individual fingers. The region they affected on me was the motor cortex which governs movement. The idea that you can use a magnet to make changes to the brain sounds like science fiction, but it isn’t fiction at all.

Lindsay is close to conclusively figuring out exactly how autistic brains differ from neurotypical brains. There is great potential for TMS being used as a diagnostic tool as well as a theraputic tool. I think you will be fascinated by this episode of Autism Talk TV.

Check out Alex’s work on Wrongplanet here.

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