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Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Ricki Robinson’

Autism America Radio – Saturday February 11th

February 10, 2012 Leave a comment

Autism America Radio welcomes special guests Dr. William Frea of Autism Spectrum Therapies.  Join hosts Nick Geber and Special guest host, author Dr. Ricki Robinson for two hours of talk and interviews this Saturday 6:00 to 8:00 PM EST on Sirius/XM Family Talk Channel 131!

People wishing to participate should call 800-679-7650 During the show or Tweet their questions to @Autismamericar. Listen online at http://www.live365.com/stations/autismamerica?play or as a podcast on iTunes! You can also visit Autism America Radio on Facebook!

Ask The Doctor- November 5th with Dr. Ricki Robinson on Autism America Radio

November 1, 2011 1 comment

On Saturday, November 5,  Autism America Radio with special guest Holly Robinson Peete and a full hour of  an ‘Ask The Doctor’ segment for the final hour of their broadcast with Dr. Ricki Robinson on this upcoming show.

Dr. Robinson will be answering questions live and on Twitter from 4-5pm PST.

People wishing to participate should call 877-520-1150 between 4-5 on Saturday or Tweet their questions to @AutismamericaR with the hash tag #askthedoctor.

Dr. Ricki Robinson is the author of Autism Solutions: How to Create a Healthy and Meaningful Life for Your Child

LIVE Chat with Dr. Ricki Robinson Transcript

September 27, 2011 2 comments

On Monday September 26 Dr. Ricki Robinson, author of  Autism Solutions: How To Create a Healthy And Meaningful Life For Your Child, hosted a LIVA Facebook Chat.

Having a child with ASD can and will have an impact on your immediate family and extended family. While it is easy to be distracted by your child’s often overwhelming needs, it is important to carve out time for your family and friends. Often they can be your best support. Additionally you may need help dealing with many concerns, including those that are emotionally charged, such as how to tell others about your child, whether to have more children, how to incorporate siblings into his program, and practical ones such as financing respite care and just organizing your life and family, as well as getting your own job at work done.

2:34
Hi everyone! We’ll be live with Dr Ricki Robinson in just under 30 minutes, at 3PM EST. In the meantime, feel free to submit questions!
2:42
Type any questions in the box below and hit ‘send’. Don’t worry if you can’t see your question, it goes straight to us!
2:42
We’ll be live with Dr Ricki in 20 minutes!
2:52
Today Dr Robinson will be …..taking questions about Having a child with ASD the impact on your immediate family and extended family.
2:59
Hi Everyone, we’re here with Dr Ricki Robinson. We’re thrilled to have her back after the last live chat she did with us!
3:00
Dr Robinson: I am so pleased to be with you again. My first chat was an exciting, intense hour! I’m a pediatrician and I’ve devoted my practice to the care of children and families affected by autism for the past 20 years.
3:01
Dr Robinson: I have recently published Autism Solutions: How to Create a Healthy and Meaningful life for your child, in which I share with families what I’ve learned over the years that has helped their children move up the developmental ladder, and problem solve the challenges they meet along the way
3:02
Dr Ricki: A portion of the proceeds of the book of course gets donated to our host, Autism Speaks!
3:02
www.DrRickiRobinson.com for more info!
3:03
So without further ado…. first question!
3:03
Comment From Loni Alpino

Is there any monetary aid for an Autistic child for feedback and therapy services?

3:04
Hi Loni!
3:04
You ask a question that plagues every parent and family who has a child with autism.
3:05
There are so many stressers that families face, and financial issues are one of the primary ones that we see in families of children with special needs.
3:05
There are potential sources of aid…. many of them depend on the state in which you’re living.
3:07
Many of the services in some of the states are provided for through state agencies. As an example, I come from California, and children who have been diagnosed with ASD qualify for services through both the educational system and the California department of Developmental Disabilities. So my recommendation is to mine the services available in your community for funding, and don’t forget about medical insurance.
3:08
Through medical insurance if you have a willing physician, you can sometimes get funded for ancillary services that might be covered by your own insurance policy, or through Medicaid, especially if your child has other medical diagnoses such as seizures, GI problems or special dietary needs.
3:09
additionally approximately 25 states have now passed state insurance reform for autism service coverage to provide many of the services that occur in home for your child.
3:10
Once you know where all your sources of funding might be, then take a critical look at your treatment plan that is required for your child, and see how each element might be covered by each of these resources to put together the most robust treatment plan for your child possible.
3:11
For more information about the state supported autism insurance laws in your state, i suggest you go to www.autismvotes.org
3:11
Comment From Guest

My daughter is 2 years old and was diagnosed autistic on April 1st. I have some family members that keep insisting she’s just delayed. They don’t understand it’s more than her not talking yet. She doesn’t respond to her name, doesn’t point to let us know what she wants and really has never babbled. She makes noises, but not what I would call babbling. Any suggestions.

3:12
Your situation is very common in families where a child has been diagnosed with special needs, most especially autism.
3:13
There are so many emotional processes that are occurring for the family as a unit, and for each of you individually after getting this diagnosis.
3:14
Of course there is the initial shock that can send you spiraling into a true grieving process, and each of you in the family will work through this in your own time frame. Part of that process includes a stage of denial as particularly i see this in family members who aren’t living with your child day to day.
3:15
It will take them often longer to come to terms with the diagnosis and along with everything else we have to be patient for these things to happen. I particularly see this in grandparents, whose often have forgotten what it was like in the early years with their children, and the bumps that happen along the way.
3:16
To that end Autism Speaks has published ‘A Grandparent’s Guide To Autism’, that was developed specifically to help grandparents understand and deal with the emotions related to a diagnosis.
3:18
I find that when other family members get some understanding of what autism is, and they can get beyond the autism label to understand what are the strengths and challenges of the child who has autism, and learn about ways in which they can learn to relate and then help their family, that this will put the family members back on track to becoming a support that you might be able to rely on.
3:22
There are also professionals who understand this process who can provide help for those who are really struggling, and sometimes that is necessary. Finding a caring pediatrician with whom you are able to share these issues may provide you the support you need to be able to take the help back to your family members. In my experience having such a case manager for the long term allows you to not only meet both the medical needs of your child and your family, but also your emotional needs.
3:22
Comment From Maureen Early

What is the best way to educate your extended family about autism, especially when it looks like a child is tantruming because they’re “naughty” instead of due to their symptoms of autism.

3:22
Hi Maureen!
3:23
I am so glad that you asked that question, because it is one of my pet peeves.
3:23
So often children, all the way up to adults with autism, are described by their behavior, as you noted.
3:23
and yet…. this behavior often comes the greatest clue that we have to what a child is thinking or feeling.
3:24
and why do I say that? When a child is not able to communicate, and yet has intent, what would we expect them to do?
3:24
Of course they’re going to do something to express themselves.
3:25
So our job is to become a detective, and to try to figure out what they’re trying to tell us. So often these behaviors don’t have intent, but are actually a response to the environment. We know that children with autism have unusual responses to the world around them.
3:26
Additionally one of the senses that we have is how we interpret our own bodies. It’s how we know that we’re hungry or that we have a pain, and where that pain is going to. My hypothesis is that it is just as difficult for children with autism to understand this sense as it is for them to understand the world around them.
3:27
Therefore quite often a change in behavior is related to how your child is feeling at that time. If a behavior is persistent and is effecting his quality of life, then it is my experience that a medical illness must be ruled out. I have covered this issue extensively in my book, for those of you who might be concerned that your child may be experiencing a medical problem.
3:28
However it is important that we “demystify” a child’s behavior for your family members. If you can ask your therapy team to help you with language that is understandable to describe these behaviors to your family members so that they can also begin to understand what your child might be expressing. This can be incredibly helpful.
3:29
Comment From Relonda Supel

What therapies and doctors should a child with autism have in place beside the therapy he gets in school and seeing your usually pediatricians

3:29
Hi Relonda!
3:29
Putting your team together is one of the paramount issues for parents and families.
3:30
Depending on your community, there will be a variety of resources that you can tap into.
3:30
If you happen to be in a community where there are few resources, then Autism Speaks has provided a resource guide to help you identify local resources.
3:31
Here’s a link to that guide:http://www.autismspeaks.org/community/fsdb/search.php
3:31
Depending on the resources available, you still need the manager of your team. In general it becomes one of the parents.
3:32
Sometimes you are able to find a professional on your team who has experience in case management. Pediatricians and other physicians sometimes do have this expertise, and you will want to find out about that.
3:33
Deciding on who your team members will be really comes from understanding your individual child. Nowhere in medicine have I experienced a complex disorder requiring so much individualization of a treatment plan.
3:33
When you determine through your professional consultations what your child’s challenges are, then my approach is that every challenge deserves the proper treatment.
3:35
This means that your treatment team will look like a wheel, with the child, parents and family at the center of the wheel, but the therapists as the spokes of the wheel, and the tire of the wheel are all the challenges and barriers that your child faces. What we know is that these challenges will change over time, especially as your child goes into adolescence and into adulthood, and so this therapeutic team will change accordingly.
3:37
That’s a long way of saying that I can’t tell you how many doctors you will need, and you will be the advocate for that, depending on the challenges that arise. Finding team members where you can have an ongoing dialog where they will listen to your concerns is key to finding the right professionals at the right time. And you, as the parent, are the keeper of that key.
3:37
Comment From Lou Melgarejo

My wife and I fear that when our kids are older, our two neuro-typical kids will resent their autistic sister for the restraints that her condition has put on our lives. Do you have any suggestions for raising siblings without resent?

3:38
Hi Lou! You too ask a question that is on the mind of most parents who have more than one child.
3:38
If truth be told, it’s on the mind of all parents, as typical siblings, as they grow up, often become resentful of their siblings, and their perception of their place in the family.
3:39
For siblings of children with autism, these feelings may come sooner, and are more real.
3:39
because off the 24/7 nature of living and helping a child with autism.
3:40
Although I can’t guarantee that you can’t raise siblings without resentment in any family, there are things we can do. I think they first thing you have to do is to help your siblings understand what is happening for their brother or sister.
3:41
We must always inform siblings as directly as possible using age appropriate language, and be certain to not let our fears and worries be evident, as they are able to pick up on these aswell. I like to describe to them, not in the terms of the autism label, but we have to tell them what that really means for their sibling.
3:43
I find that older siblings, who so much crave to have an interaction with their brother or sister, but don’t know how, can be mentored by giving simple techniques and instructions as to how they might be able to engage their sibling in a meaningful way that will be fun for both of them. I find also that having a sibling with autism is a double edged sword: resentment goes hand in hand with guilt.
3:45
Siblings may feel guilty because they do not have autism, and yet may resent the time that you might have to spend with their brother or sister. These issues are best dealt with if brought to the front and center in a way that will help these children deal with their own emotional journey.
3:47
Studies have shown that siblings who have brothers or sisters with ASD often learn to cope quite well. For many learning to be a helpful member of the family becomes second nature. In fact as an adult a sibling one of the helping careers and may become more skilled than their peers in responding positively to their own emotional needs.
3:48
if you happen to have a child who’s having a difficult time, especially as an adolescent you may also need to consider getting them the support they need to work through these emotional issues.
3:48
Comment From Bobbie Jo

sometimes my son seems as if he is bi polar. I expressed my concern and I am told that it is normal for a child that has autisim?

3:49
Actually Bobbie Jo, what you’re describing, which I presume is mood changes, both highs and lows in your son, can occur in autism, but is not necessarily part of autism.
3:51
Often these mood concerns can interfere with your child’s daily life and absolutely derail learning and interactions. if this is the case, then we do have ways of addressing these issues medically. Certainly your son deserves a full medical evaluation. In this case I would suggest asking your primary care physician first, to refer you to a specialist, which might be a child psychiatric or neurologist, or developmental pediatrician who has expertise in this area.
3:53
Mood issues in autism is considered a co-morbid condition that are overlapping the symptoms of the autism. this is not always easy to sort out, and is why you need a physician with expertise to help you determine what is happening for your child, and the correct treatment approach. Again, if you’re having trouble finding a professional in your community who can help you, please check out the Autism Speaks resources guide:http://www.autismspeaks.org/community/fsdb/search.php
3:54
Comment From Joseph

Do you put any emphasis into the new belief that Autistic kids should now also have included in their therapies joint attention therapy?

3:55
I am so glad you asked that question Joseph.
3:57
For children with autism, who at their core have a delay in social and emotional development, it behooves us as part of their treatment program an approach that helps them gain mastery of social interactions. In order to do that one has to go back to the basics, and help a child develop his ability to attend to another in a meaningful way, in order to engage and interact.
3:57
Recent research has confirmed that children who developed joint attention have greater gains in language than those who have not.
3:59
This underscores the hypothesis that strong foundational social and emotional development is really required for a child to be able to think and create. This at the end of the day is what we hope for all children with ASD. So how are you going to do this? There are many techniques that can supplement what your program is, or can be the primary focus of your program, that will support your child developing joint attention and engagement and reciprocity in play.
4:00
I use the DIR/Floortime approach in order to foster these abilities. I have described them fully in “Autism Solutions, and describe how to implement Floortime in the home throughout the day.
4:03
Other approaches that can help include the Early Start Denver Model. Practitioners of these approaches are increasing around the world. Floortime was designed for parents to learn how to interact with their children by understanding how their child learns about the world, what they’re individual differences are that derails this interaction, and then entering their world with this understanding by following their child’s interests.
4:03
If you wish to pursue this, Autism Speaks has a reference library for books on these subjects.
4:04
Remember, shared emotion with others and relationships that are developed are the glue that supports all that your child does.
4:07
I want to leave you with a final message today: I’m sorry I couldn’t get to all your questions, but I hope to be back in the future for more. Just remember: believe in your strength, creativity and love. Your family will help you meet the challenges of raising a child with autism, so you can help your child be the best that he or she can be!
4:08
Autism Speaks: Thanks everyone for coming, and thanks Dr Ricki for another great chat. Sorry we didn’t get to everyone’s questions.
4:08
You can forward any questions to familyservices@autismspeaks.org, or call our autism response team 888 288 4762
4:10
If you’re interested in Dr Ricki’s book, Autism Solutions, check out her site here: http://www.drrickirobinson.com/
4:11
Thanks everyone!

Dr. Ricki Robinson to Host a Family Services Q & A

September 22, 2011 5 comments

On Monday, September  26 at 3pm EDT, Dr. Ricki Robinson, will discuss ASD and the Family on a Family Services Live Chat.

Having a child with ASD can and will have an impact on your immediate family and extended family. While it is easy to be distracted by your child’s often overwhelming needs, it is important to carve out time for your family and friends. Often they can be your best support. Additionally you may need help dealing with many concerns, including those that are emotionally charged, such as how to tell others about your child, whether to have more children, how to incorporate siblings into his program, and practical ones such as financing respite care and just organizing your life and family, as well as getting your own job at work done.

On Tuesday April 5 Dr. Ricki Robinson, author of Autism Solutions: How To Create a Healthy And Meaningful Life For Your Child, hosted a Facebook Chat. Dr. Ricki took an hour to answer questions from the community. There were 944 total participants and 345 questions!

Family Services Office Hours – 09.21.11

September 22, 2011 1 comment

Office Hours easily connects families to a wide variety of autism-related resources, including Family Services Tool Kits, and the Autism Speaks Resource Guide, an online national database of autism providers and resources searchable by state and zip code.

Family Services Office Hours is designed to quickly provide access to resources that are available and free to the entire autism community.

The Office Hours sessions are staffed by ART coordinators who are specially trained to connect families affected by autism to resources.

In recognition of National Grandparents Day, on September 11th Autism Speaks is celebrating the grandparent connection in families affected by autism. During the month of September, we are asking grandparents to share your experiences, so that other grandparents across the country can benefit from your knowledge and the road you have traveled. 

3:03
Hi Everyone! Welcome to this week’s Family Services Office Hours! We are here to answer any questions you have about our resources and help connect you with others. So ask away!
3:04
Comment From sheila 

is there in sevices in lawrenceburg tn

3:05
Hi Sheila! Here is a link to our Tennessee Resource type! You can check for resources in your area!http://www.autismspeaks.org/community/fsdb/state.php?sid=50
3:05
Comment From Robbin 

I would like to know if there are any extracurricular activities in my area for my 16 year old son with Aspergers?

3:05
Hi Robbin! You can find lots of resources in our Resource Guide. All you need to do is click on your state, select categories like “Recreation and Community Activities” and type in your zip code.
3:06
I also suggest you order our Transition Tool Kit, it was designed specifically to help families of individuals with autism ages 14-22 on the transition to adulthood. It has lots of tips, including more about how ti get involved in the community.
3:06
Comment From Maggie 

Hi Autism Speaks. Thank you for giving us this opportunity to ask questions. I think my three-year-old son has autism. A friend of mine’s son was just diagnosed and I see a lot of his traits in my son. What should my first step be?

3:06
You can order a free copy on our website!
3:07
Hi Maggie! Thank you so much for joining us! There is a page on our website, ‘Learn the Signs.’http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/learn-signsYou should also work closely with your pediatrician to be sure your son is reaching developmental milestones and to track his progress.
3:07
Also, check out our Video Glossaryhttp://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/learn-signs
3:09
We would also like to recommend a wonderful book, ‘ Autism Solutions’ by Dr. Ricki Robinson. Dr. Robinson will be here for a LIVE Chat on Monday, September 26th so check back for more!http://drrickirobinson.com/
3:10
Comment From Britt 

Hi Autism Speaks. My son was diagnosed with autism at 3. He is now 4. Lately a lot of people have been asking us what degree he is…and I have no idea. When he was diagnosed no oe mentioned a degree or anything like that that. Is this important to know? Does it make a difference? How would I go about finding this out? Thanks so much.

3:10
Hi Britt. Your pediatrician can help provide you with more information. However, regardless of the formal diagnosis, every child with autism is different so it is more important to focus on your child’s strengths and weaknesses and make decisions about his treatments based on what you see. You know him the best!
3:13
Comment From Connor

My wife and I are having difficulty potty training our daughter who has autism. Do you have any tips for us?

3:15
Hi Connor! Thank you so much for joining our chat. This is often difficult for families! Here are two books that we recommend!
3:15
Teach Toileting: A Revolutionary Approach for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other Special Needs
by Deborah Bialer http://www.amazon.com/teach-toileting-revolutionary-approach-disorders/dp/0615255523
3:15
Toilet Training for Individuals with Autism or Other Developmental Issues, 2nd Edition
by Maria Wheelerhttp://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1932565493/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=autispea-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399369&creativeASIN=1932565493
3:15
We haven’t read them ourselves but they have been submitted to our Resource Library by other families that have found them helpful, so I hope they are helpful to you too!
3:20
Comment From Britt

Thank you. Also, How would I go about finding activities for my son do? The state law here has changed for his IEP and it now says that he should have more social interaction…but we are having a hard time finding classes and activities for him that accept and understand kids with special needs. And lastly, do you know of or have any resource information for military families? My husband is AF and its likely that we will be moving again within the next two years. So I would like to get a resourceful connection if I can before then. Thanks you again.

3:21
Hi Britt, please visit our Resource Guide. You can search by state to find activities for your son.http://www.autismspeaks.org/community/fsdb/search.phpYou can also visit our Community Connections, ‘Have Some Fun Today! Recreation, Community Activities, Clubs and More!’http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/community-connections/have-some-fun-today-recreation-community-activities-clubs-and-
3:23
The Organization for Autism Research has sponsored a program called, ‘Operation Autism.’ It is a resource guide specifically for military families.http://www.operationautismonline.org/tag/military/
3:25
ACT Today! is a national non-profit organization is a mission to raise awareness and provide treatment services to families that cannot afford the treatments and services their children require.http://www.acttodayformilitaryfamilies.org/
3:25
Comment From Britt

Awesome! Thank you so much!

3:25
Comment From John

My daughter is having a hard time transitioning back to school. She is new in her mainstream class. How can I help her peers understand what autism is and why she has challenges. Thanks so much for taking the time here!

3:26
Hi John! We are sorry to hear that your daughter is having difficulties. We recently created a Community Connections, ‘Back to School: Let’s Get Ready for a Great Year’ that provides tips about how to ease this transition.http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/community-connections/back-to-school
3:27
You can also look at our School Community Tool Kit in the section ‘Peers’ for more informationhttp://www.autismspeaks.org/docs/family_services_docs/sk/Peers.pdf
3:27
Comment From Sally

How do I talk with soemone in person.

3:28
Hi Sally! We have an Autism Response Team, and our trained coordinators would be happy to speak to you. You can email them directly at familyservices@autismspeaks.org or call them at 888-AUTISM2. They are available during regular business hours.
3:37
Comment From Liz

I have a 9 year old son with Autism/Aspergers. I have not been able to find a way to explain his autism to him. I need help finding a way to talk to him in a way he will understand. Is there an easy way?

3:38
Hi Liz, this is a struggle for many families. Please visit our Resource Library where we have a list of Asperger Syndrome websites http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/resource-library/asperger-syndrome
3:38
We also have an ‘Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism Tool Kit’ Tool Kit that can be downloaded for FREE here!http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/asperger-syndrome-and-high-functioning-autism-tool-kit
3:40
Comment From allison

i have a son 24 years old that was diagnosed as high functional with a photographic memory but i feel like he should be re-evaluated

3:41
Hi Allison. Re-evaluation is always a good idea if you feel like his diagnosis may have changed. You are the one who knows your child best, so it may be a good idea to trust your instincts and bring your son back to his doctor.
3:44
Comment From Colleen

What is this CARA thing I keep hearing about? Thanks for your help!

3:44
Comment From Louisa mciver

regarding the legislation that was re-approved yesterday….mandating coverage of autism therapies.

3:45
CARA, which stands for Combating Autism Reauthorization Act, was passed the the House yesterday(YIPEEEE), but we still have to wait for it to make it through Senate. For more information, you can visit this blog post by Judith Ursitt, the Director of State Government Affairs at Autism Speakshttp://blog.autismspeaks.org/2011/09/21/tell-congress-to-pass-the-combating-autism-reauthorization-act/
3:46
We have just a 9 days left to pass the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act (CARA) of 2011 before critical provisions expire on September 30th. On September 20th, the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act passed with a floor vote in the House of Representatives. Now, we need you to switch your focus again back ot the Senate. Contact your Senators to ask themto support this important piece of legislation!
3:46
Comment From Louisa mciver

The info I read says that state operated insurance has to cover autism therapies, etc. Does this also apply to group insurance through an employer?

3:46
You can click on your state to learn what is happening there!http://www.autismvotes.org/site/c.frKNI3PCImE/b.3909861/k.B9DF/State_Initiatives.htm
3:56
Thank you for joining us today! Our next live chat is Monday at 3PM. Dr. Ricki Robinson is going to discuss ASD and its impact on family members. She will have lots of great things to say so don’t forget to tune in!
3:57
As part of the live chat, we will be giving away ten of Dr. Robinson’s new book called Autism Solutions. So join us!
3:58
As always, if you have any other questions, please don’t hesitate to contact our Autism Response Team at familyservices@autismspeaks.org or 888-AUTISM2. Enjoy the rest of your day!

First LIVE Facebook Chat a Success with Dr. Ricki

April 6, 2011 2 comments

 

On Tuesday April 5 Dr. Ricki Robinson, author of Autism Solutions: How To Create a Healthy And Meaningful Life For Your Child, hosted the inaugural Autism Speaks Facebook Chat. Dr. Ricki took an hour to answer questions from the community. There were 944 total participants and 345 questions! Time wouldn’t allow for Dr. Ricki to address each question, but she did however agree to make this a regular occurrence and we couldn’t be happier!

Ali Dyer and Dr. Ricki Robinson

To read the entire transcript, please visit here.

The Story Behind Autistic-Like

March 30, 2011 2 comments

This is a guest post by Erik Linthorst is a 13-year veteran of the film business. An award winning documen­tary filmmaker and a produced screenwriter.  Erik founded Pergé Produc­tions in 2006 to make films aimed at helping families with children with special needs.  In his advocacy work, Erik travels worldwide, present­ing his film and advancing the issues it raises.

Throughout April, PBS stations around the country will air a documentary film Erik Linthorst made about searching for the right help for his son, Graham, who doctors called “autistic-like”   Check your local listings for airtimes, or www.autisticlike.com.

Autistic-Like:Graham’s Story started as a project for me, but I now realize it has become something more like a community. Many people have told us our story sounds so familiar, and that’s really why I made the movie: I felt like it shouldn’t be so hard to find the right help for our children.

Our story began in 2005, a very hard year for our family.  Our seventeen-month old son’s quirks were blooming into full-fledged obsessions.  We had experts on one side saying he was clearly and possibly severely autistic.  We had experts on the other side saying he was most likely not autistic. Still others insisted he was too young to diagnose.  We had family and friends on both sides giving us advice that was by turns helpful, misguided and sometimes downright bad.  My wife and I were in an emotional tailspin, alternately propping each other up and freaking each other out with our anxious thoughts.

Then we began the slow process of digging out:  discarding this expert for that one, this treatment for that, this book for that, this piece of advice for another.  And we grew in strength.  Once I was back on my feet, and feeling armed with new understanding, I felt the desire to reach out to families just beginning their hard year.  I felt like sharing our story might help them dig-out faster.  So, being in the film business, I decided to make a documentary about our journey.  I brought out my camera, began to chronicle our lives, and recruited journalist Jody Becker to help investigate the issues, elevating an intimate family story into what we aimed to make a thoughtful report from the edge of the autism epidemic.

Then I sent the film, Autistic-Like: Graham’s Story, out into the world and planned to be done.  But then the emails started coming in.  And they kept coming.  Then the trickle became a wash, several a day, coming in from all over the U.S., and then Canada, and then from all over the world.  And they all had questions.  What did I think about this therapy? that biomedical approach? This doctor? That organization?  I took the time to respond to all of them, because the truth is it helped me feel no so alone, too.

I heard from professionals, as well.  Many told me they use the film as a new parent orientation tool. They shared that they were teaching workshops, and seminars with it.  Schools were holding movie night fundraisers.  But they had questions too:  How could they see the extended interviews from the film?  Did I have an update on Graham’s progress?  workshops?

After much consideration, both for Graham’s sake as well as my wife and my own, I decided to say ‘yes’ to all of the above.

So this month our little movie hits a milestone: the PBS broadcasts include an 8-minute update “Where is Graham Now”; we have translated the film into Spanish to reach more families, and now more insights from the experts are available in a  2 DVD Box set that includes a full-color 12 page guidebook for facilitating professional and community conversations. I’ve traveled with the film, met hundreds of parents and professionals, and like the slowly dawning realization that supporting Graham is a project with no end for me, I see the film that way, too. More families, more conversation, more resources. The story continues.

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