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Roses for Autism

February 16, 2012 Leave a comment

The mission of Roses for Autism is to grow independence in the business world through a replicable Autism training and employment program integrated in a successful and sustainable rose business. The vision is to demonstrate a replicable working model for inclusive transitional employment for youth and adults on the Autism Spectrum. In 2011, Autism Speaks awarded $25,000 to Roses for Autism through its Family Services Community Grants program.

Roses for Autism is a unique venture, combining training and employment of people on the autism spectrum with the growth and sale of flowers. This is a business that not only employs people; it employs people who have an unacceptably high level of unemployment. The project location is Pinchbeck’s Rose Farm in Guilford, CT.

Roses for Autism is unique, integrating three businesses in a single enterprise:

  • Employment and training for people with Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Agricultural – Raising flowers in the country’s largest free-standing glass greenhouse
  • Sales – Rooted in autism cause-based marketing

Over the course of the grant period, we have learned:

  • It is not only the lack of job skills, but also the lack of social skills that hamper success in the workplace.
  • It takes time to successfully develop individual strategies for participants and transfer them to general work environments.
  • It is essential to offer other resources to participants outside of employment strategies.
  • Participants gained confidence, school grades improved and participation in the program is having a positive impact on people’s lives.

Demonstrating success:

Incidental reports from families, schools and program staff noted that some participants are reporting and/or exhibiting increased confidence, better grades in school and motivation to be more social. In some instances, participants are forming friendships with peers, staff and/or customers. One unexpected and extremely exciting success is the young man who after being driven back and forth to the program by his mother, learned to navigate public transportation to get to work independently. Desiring still more independence, he recently secured his driver’s license – a goal that was beyond his wildest expectations. He is now working toward saving his money from his job at the rose farm to buy a car.

Roses for Autism currently employs eight individuals on the spectrum that are working in an integrated environment for competitive wages. During 2011, 290,500 roses were sold.

For more information, please visit www.rosesforautism.com!

The grant cycle is officially open on February 17.

To learn about our newly announced RFA for Family Services Community Grants, please visit http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/grants/community-grants

Destination: Independence

June 2, 2010 2 comments

To date, Autism Speaks has funded $1.9 million in Family Services Community Grants to more than 100 service organizations around the country in the areas of education, recreation; equipment/supportive technology and young adults/adults.  The following is from one of our recipients from 2008, the Asperger’s Association of New England which serves individuals with Asperger Syndrome throughout New England:

The Asperger’s Association of New England, or AANE, is very grateful for the generous grant from Autism Speaks that allowed us to offer the Destination: Independence program. Destination: Independence consisted of a series of four courses on independent living skills, reinforced through one-on-one coaching under AANE’s Life Management Assistance Program (LifeMAP). Destination: Independence was designed to meet the practical needs of young adults with AS, who tend to be less mature than neurotypical young adults, are often stuck in their attempts to establish independent lives, and are less likely to be able to resolve their problems though traditional interventions such as “talk therapy.”  Participants were able to learn independent living skills in a hands-on manner; learned life tasks with the assistance of a coach; increased independence; and employed problem-solving, social interaction, relationship building, and social pragmatic skills.

One participant wrote on his evaluation form:
I wanted to give you a little feedback on what I am working on. As you may know, I am going to graduate from college in May and I do not think I would have passed this last course without the help of Destination: Adulthood and my LifeMAP coach. So I accomplished that goal. Now, I am working on volunteering at the JFK library and getting a part-time job. Thanks for the help, T.

Another wrote:
My LifeMap coach and I have been working on me learning how to use transportation which I think that I could still use practice on. We also worked on going grocery shopping and making healthy food and drink choices at the grocery store! She was helpful with my goals and I would like to continue to work with her.

A coach wrote:
I see increased confidence in the client due to my (the coach’s) validation of her struggles and challenges, and due to success in overcoming of obstacles. We are close in age and so I found that the client looked up to me like an older sister or just a role model. I noticed that my compliments and acceptance of who she was and my encouragement for her attempts at finding a job, acquiring a driver’s license, etc., helped her accept that while her pace might be slower than her peers’ she would eventually get there.

Another coach wrote:
The client, a recent (out-of-state) college graduate, was also very isolated and had the goal of maintaining social relationships, but it became clear that she did not have local relationships to maintain. The coach accompanied her to events at AANE initially, and eventually she began to attend on her own. The coach’s involvement in getting the client to come to AANE was instrumental in making new relationships and eventually led to the client joining a weekly AANE support group and connecting to a therapist through AANE as well.

Congratulations to AANE and Destination Independence on their wonderful program!

Autism Speaks in currently accepting Letters of Intent until June 10, 2010 – get those great ideas in to us so we can continue to serve the community!  Please also visit our Advancing Futures for Adults with Autism initiative at www.afaa-us.org and “like us” on Facebook, where we regularly post articles and items of interest regarding adult issues and services.

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