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Posts Tagged ‘Family Services’

Thank You Grandparents!

September 26, 2011 Leave a comment

In recognition of National Grandparents Day, on September 11th Autism Speaks is celebrating the  grandparent connection in families affected by autism. During the month of September, we are asking grandparents to share your experiences, so that other grandparents across the country can benefit from your knowledge and the road you have traveled.

We extend a special thank you on behalf of your grandchildren and your adult children for being a part of their lives. You have and will continue to make it easier for them to do what they need to do and provide for the best future possible for their family.

Grandparents: How do you connect?

September 14, 2011 33 comments

In recognition of National Grandparents Day, on September 11th Autism Speaks is celebrating the  grandparent connection in families affected by autism. During the month of September, we are asking grandparents to share your experiences, so that other grandparents across the country can benefit from your knowledge and the road you have traveled.

Grandparents often describe some difficulties when trying to find ways to connect with their grandkids, like enjoying an activity together. What are some useful and practical tips you’ve used to connect and spend time with your grandchild?

JOIN OUR OFFICE HOURS NOW!

The Grandparent Connection in Families Affected by Autism

September 13, 2011 56 comments

In recognition of National Grandparents Day, on September 11th Autism Speaks is celebrating the  grandparent connection in families affected by autism. During the month of September, we are asking grandparents to share your experiences, so that other grandparents across the country can benefit from your knowledge and the road you have traveled. 

Like the parents of children with autism, grandparents can have different reactions and responses when they learn their grandchild was diagnosed with autism. What was this like for you? What helped you through this difficult time? What gave you hope for the future for your family and grandchild?

Back to School: What is your child eating for lunch?

August 22, 2011 20 comments

It can be a challenge for parents to make sure your child with autism is getting the right nutrition and diet while at school. How do parents make sure their child’s is continuing the eating habits and they get the nutrition they need?

Are you looking for more tips? Check out our Community Connections!

You can also check out our LIVE Chat with Gary Mayerson and our Family Services ‘Back to School‘ themed Office Hours!

Family Services offers a School Community Tool Kit that assists members of the school community in understanding and supporting students with autism. You can download it for free!


Family Services Office Hours – 8/17/11

August 18, 2011 2 comments

Office Hours, a new resource available on the web at www.autismspeaks.org will easily connect families to a wide variety of autism-related resources, including Family Services’ Toolkits, and the Autism Speaks Resource Guide, an online national database of autism providers and resources searchable by state and zip code. Family Services’ Office Hours is designed to quickly provide access to resources that are available and free to the entire autism community.

“Having a family member with autism can easily lead to feeling isolated without knowing where to turn. In addition, most families have little free time to search for reliable information about autism, yet they may be in need of timely information. Office Hours offers a quick connection to the Autism Response Team(ART) who can assist you in getting the information you need as quickly as possible,” states Marianne Sullivan, Assistant Director of National Outreach and Resources.

The Office Hours resource is staffed by ART coordinators who are specially trained to connect families affected by autism to resources.

In addition to Office Hours, ART is available by telephone during usual business hours at 888-AUTISM 2 (888-288-4762). You can also reach ART by email at familyservices@autismspeaks.org.

Here is the transcript:

12:59
Welcome to Office Hours offered by the Family Services Department at Autism Speaks. Today’s Office Hours is staffed by Marianne Sullivan, RN, MN, Assistant Director of National Outreach and resources.
1:02
Back to School for Children with Autism
What we can do to make the transition back to school as smooth as possible for our kids with autism? Over last few weeks we’ve highlighted ways to reduce the stress associated with back to school; one common theme: plan and prepare ahead of time! Do you have a tip you to share with other parents?
1:20
Comment From Guest 

I took my son to his new school several times to tour and meet important people. I started at the end of the year before his move and had at least 2 visits over the summer.

1:20
Hi there! Those are some great suggestions. How did it work out?
1:21
Making the time to meet and get to know the key people in your child’s school is a great way to start the new year!
1:22
Comment From Guest 

My child is transitioning from a private school to public this year..He is entering 7th grade. What can I do to ease this transition?

1:23
Thank you for your questions.Family Services offers the School Community Tool Kit that offers great ideas on how students can adapt in their new school
1:23
Please feel free to download all of our Tool Kits! They are FREE!
1:23
A great idea would be to gather a portfolio of your child’s strengths and and challenges as you introduce your child to his/her teacher
1:24
Portfolios can include artwork, writing, and other school related samples
1:25
This is also a great way to have a record of your child’s school life.
1:26
Comment From Erica 

My son is 3 and has ASD. He started pre-k at an integrated school on his 3rd birthday. We are preparing him for the new school year, which he has no problems with. My issue is the length of time. Is a full day of school overbearing to a child with ASD?

1:28
Hi Erica – Every child is different. It is an excellent question. Remember you are the parents and you know what is best for the child. It is a matter of making sure that you as a parents are monitoring the stresses or behaviors of your child to indicate how well they are doing. I would include the teacher in terms of getting them on board to monitor certain situations
1:28
Remember every plan can be adjusted based on your child’s needs!
1:29
Comment From Guest 

My child started high school this week – the increased student population and campus size seems to be giving him the most anxiety in this change…we will be meeting his teachers tomorrow evening…or, at least 7 of the 8…and have sent emails introducing ourselves. I’ve reminded him that he didn’t like the changes each time he ‘moved up’ – from elementary to middle, from middle to junior and to give himself some time to adjust. Any more suggestions?

1:30
You have laid great groundwork communicating with the teachers and have created an opportunity for continued interaction. Again, the portfolio is a great resource to go back to. It is important to see the progress of your child through the years.
1:30
Another thing you should check out is our Transition Tool Kit. The Autism Speaks Transition Tool Kit was created to serve as a guide to assist families on the journey from adolescence to adulthood. You can never plan to far in advance!
1:31
Comment From Guest 

I seem to be having trouble getting my sons school to understand that he needs special help at all. He has attended there for two years in the early childhood program but was just recently diagnosed with ASD. He is starting full day kindergarten and they don’t seem interested in the ideas that I have for my son such as visual schedules, help off the bus and with lunch. They have him labeled as delayed on his IEP and also don’t seem interested in changing that to a firm ASD label. How do I insist on these things?

1:34
The key is to knowing what your child’s rights are under IDEA and State law. We have a ‘Special Education and Advocacy’ Community Connections that you may find helpful.
1:35
Tomorrow we will be releasing a new Community Connections that will be targeting IEP’s as well. You can also join our LIVE Q & A tonight a 7pm EDT with Gary Mayerson as he, ‘How To Compromise With Your School District Without Compromising Your Child’
1:35
Comment From Guest 

My 9 year old son was diagnosed with HFA this summer. My question is do we allow the teacher to tell his classmates? If so, what is the best way to go about this? He attends a (wonderful) private school and they have been very helpful. Just curious if we ease some of the teasing he receives by telling his classmates?

1:36
If your child was just diagnosed, you can order an Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Tool Kit that includes ideas how to talk to classmates about ASD. You can order one for FREE.
1:37
There is a more specific section that you may find especially helpful, ‘Asperger Syndrome/HFA and the Classroom.’
1:37
You can order the kit by calling us at 888-AUTISM 2 (288-4762) or email us at familyservices@autismspeaks.org.
1:39
There is a specific module of the School Community Tool Kit that deals with how to talk to your peers about ASD. You may want to share this with your child
1:39
Comment From Renee 

Son is going to the same school..but they moved him to a new teacher and classroom which is going to be difficult since he had his last teacher for 3 years..He is 17 and large for his size and doesn’t talk so what can I do to make the first couple of days go smoothly for him?

1:40
Renee we want to suggest good communication right from the beginning. Can you talk to the teacher ahead of time? Youc an tell them about your son – likes and dislikes, how he communicates, etc.
1:41
We would also want to recommend the Transition Tool Kit that you can order or download for FREE!http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/transition-tool-kit
1:41
Comment From Guest 

WONDERFUL! Thank you so very much—just pulled from the links and my printer is going nuts! The questions sheet is fantastic! Thank you!

1:42
That is great! We are so glad that we were able to help and PLEASE keep us posted!
1:43
Renee, another though – perhaps you may want to ask a former teacher to share with his new teacher what your son’s strengths and weaknesses are. Maybe they can share strategies that worked with your son and those that may not have
1:44
Comment From Guest 

My AS son will be going from full day preschool to half day K. He did NOT get the teacher he wanted but his twin did, so he’s going in with a bad attitude. I am meeting with his teacher the wk before K starts and have a little “about Jason” booklet for her. I have to wait to get any special education help, I am told. Our school district is VERY against IEPs and 504s…

1:45
Again the key to your child’s rights are under IDEA and state law. As a parent you have the right to request that your child be assessed and that services be provided.
1:46
I recommend you provide your school with a copy of IDEA.http://idea.ed.gov/
1:46
You have to know your child rights. Your special needs child has the right to a free and appropriate education.http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/your-childs-rights
1:47
Tonight Gary Mayerson will be on for a LIVE Q & A to discuss ‘How To Compromise With Your School District Without Compromising Your Child’
1:47
Please feel free to join us at 7pm EDT TONIGHT!http://www.facebook.com/autismspeaks?sk=app_232959576748556
1:48
Comment From Jenny 

4.5 boy with pdd-nos. Is there an example of a notebook that would allow his special and integrated school teachers, aids, and PT’s to communicate with eachother and me on progress/ concerns?

1:49
Hi Jenny, thanks so much for your question. Please visit our School Community Tool Kit Appendix that contains many forms and other resources.http://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/sctk_appendix.pdf
1:49
Paula Kluth is also a wonderful resource. She has samples of personal portfolios that you may choose to model your child’s after
1:50
Portfolios can be in paper, audio, or video form. They are meant to serve as a record for past experiences so you can track your child’s progress
1:51
Comment From Anthony 

My son is 33 months and so far not showing any signs of autism… At what age can I stop worrying about regression?

1:52
Hi Anthony – it is good that you are on top of this. Continue to observe your child as he develops. Here is a link where you can learn the signs. http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/learn-signs
1:54
Comment From Jo 

We are a military family and have moved twice in the past year, resulting in my ASD/ADHD daughter going to two schools for K, and now starting 1st at a whole new school. 3 schools, in 3 different states. The original IEP call for school provide Speech and OT with additional OT after school one day a week. The second school cut OT because the provider essentially didn’t have time for my daughter in her schedule, she was the only provider in the county and serviced ALL the elementary schools. The new school is doing their assessment for what remains on her IEP, speech therapy. Can I ask them to reevaluate her needs for OT? And I’m worried now that they might cut her speech, if they do, she wont even have an IEP anymore. what can I do?

1:55
Hi Jo – Because military families move, there are special services, provided by the military that should advocate for your child. Operation Autism is a resource guide designed for military famlies
1:56
Autism Speaks is involved with autism advocacy efforts for military families as well. Please visit Autism Votes for more information.http://www.autismvotes.org/site/c.frKNI3PCImE/b.5141983/k.A9E4/Military_homepage.htm
1:57
‘Welcome to StimCity’ is a wonderful blog by a woman named Rachel. She is a military wife and her daughter has ASD. You may find comfort in reading her blog.
1:57
We were lucky enough to have her blog for us!http://blog.autismspeaks.org/2011/07/21/itow-meeting-my-baby-girl/
1:58
Comment From Diana 

My child is in a dod school. They dont seem to have the right placement for her but wont referr her to a school that does what should i do about this?

1:58
Hi Diana – Wright’s Law has specific information on meeting the needs of your child with special needs. You can learn more about it here. http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/dod.index.htm
2:00
Thanks so much for stopping by today for Family Services Office Hours. Please come back with us tonight as Gary Mayerson leads us in a Q & A ‘How To Compromise With Your School District Without Compromising Your Child’
2:00
We will see you next week! Remember to stay positive and have a great school year! Keep us posted on your progress!
2:01
As always you can call us at 888-AUTISM 2 (288-4762) or email us at familyservices@autismspeaks.org.

Moving Out

July 14, 2011 21 comments

This is a guest post by Pat Kemp, Executive Vice President – Marketing, Corporate Relations and Development at Autism Speaks and the father of a young man with autism.

Tears were pouring down my cheeks as I was typing my 5 sentence letter to my son explaining to him that he was being asked to leave of my house and would not be living with me anymore.  See, Ryan is not just any child; he is a special needs child who functions on the low end of the autism spectrum.  He is nonverbal and very vulnerable.  However, according to my attorney, Ryan could not live me after he was 18 if I wanted him to be eligible for housing and other subsidies.  It was time for him to learn how to ‘live on his own’.  How sad, yet I wrote and signed and dated it because it was how the ‘system’ worked.  I still needed him protected in a safe and secure environment.  So we went house hunting.

Ryan’s first home after ‘declaring his independence’ was a house that I was able to rent in his name at OATS (Offering Alternative Therapies with Smiles).  OATS is a 55 acre horse farm in northern Oakland County that provides horseback riding therapies for individuals with special needs.  Ryan had been a participant in the program there since it opened up in the late 90’s, so he was familiar with the surroundings.  Plus, the entire property was fenced in so I at least could feel that he was safe.  This worked out for a couple of years until I found a house to rent on a lake (Ryan loves the water) in Davisburg.  The landlord has a daughter with Aspergers and lives next door, so he understands the situation.

I moved Ryan into his new home in Davisburg and put a sign on the front door that says “Ryan’s Party Place”.  It is his private bachelor pad with athlete pictures on the walls, a pinball machine, an air hockey machine, etc.  He visits my place once or twice a week and we stay in contact so I know he is safe and he knows I care about him.  We call it that he needs some ‘Dad time’.  I also need my ‘Ryan time.’

The next challenge was to get Ryan a job and teach him how to communicate better on his own.  First things first, time to get a job.  Ryan loves the outdoors.  He and I have volunteered for many years to feed the horses and clean the stalls at OATS on Sunday mornings.  I knew he had the skills to do this job, but OATS is a 501(c) 3 charity so I didn’t want to ask for Ryan to get a paying job there.  After many months we secured a janitorial services job 8 hours/week at The Palace of Auburn Hills.  Since Ryan loves the Pistons, I thought it would be a natural for him.  So far, so good.  He has his good days and his not so good days.  He gets to wear a special shirt with his name badge on it which he likes a lot.  He also gets to eat lunch at the employee cafeteria which he really enjoys.

Communication is a longer term project.  For Ryan to really function independently, his communication skills need to improve exponentially.  I bought him an iPad and we are programming that now.  We have met with communication specialists and have ideas that we want to work on.  Yet, like many children with special needs, Ryan inevitably surfaces another problem that needs to be addressed.  Most recently it was an incredible need for O.T. which we are working on with specialists.  Who knows what tomorrow will bring.  Hopefully sunshine.  Ryan likes sunshine.  One thing I learned to accept a long time ago is that autism is like running a marathon, it isn’t a sprint.  Patience, focus, persistence and advocacy are the keys to providing our children a brighter future than today.  There are never ending needs for services for these individuals.  We, as parents and advocates of individuals with special needs, need to stick together and fight for their rights.  What I have also learned is that it is not important whether Ryan lives with me or not.  I wasn’t giving him enough credit that he was ready to live on his own.  However, I will never forget how difficult it was for me to sign that letter 9 years ago.  My tears are still wet on my cheeks, but at the end of the day, I think I made the right decision.

An Employment Story

July 7, 2011 6 comments

BJ is a young man who is affiliated with Ken’s Krew, Inc., a nonprofit corporation, is to provide vocational training and job placement services to young adults with intellectual and learning disabilities who are transitioning into the workforce.

My name is B.J. Ivey I am 29 years old and have been with the home depot and Ken’s Krew for 9 years you can tell how old I am by how many years I have been working at the home depot. I was first introduced to Ken’s Krew back in 2001-2002 when it was still called Ken’s Kids I was at CAT Pickering trying to take some more machine shop training that was the tech area that I was in when I was in 9th grade. But it didn’t work out the teacher quit 5 days before the start of school. So I tried carpentry but I wasn’t good so then I went to electronics and that fit me well as I was doing my extra learning I tried to get help with going to college and there was one in Vermont that was geared towards kids with learning disabilities but they said that I didn’t have the kind they mostly teach with which was dyslexia. I didn’t know what to do so one of the teachers found Ken’s Krew and called them up and that’s how I met Debbie I am working at the Frazer home depot as the pro loader meaning I help out with the contractors mostly loading cement, drywall, and lumber. I was chosen as a co captain for the project at a school for kids like me it felt good to be a leader and while I was there I saw my old boss our project was to build a deer fence around the green house we put in posts filled them with cement and then wrapped deer block ours was probably the longest project because while we were working almost everyone else was done and yes I had fun working with everyone. While I am working at the home depot I hope to try and become an anime writer I have some stories written out and I want to find a producer that will help me I am saying this because when I went to a school for the disabled there was a kid who owned his own business I was surprised by that thinking his type of disability would hold him back. I am enjoying working at the home depot and I might be there for a while longer.

’100 Day Tool Kit’ LIVE Facebook Conversation

June 23, 2011 5 comments
5:07
Hi Everyone!
5:08
Thanks for joining the chat today!
5:08
We apologize for our technical issues!
5:08
Today’s chat will focus on supporting families whose child has been recently diagnosed with autism. Most parents wonder: What do I do next? Where can I learn about the diagnosis? How will this affect other family members? Today, we want to help answer these types of questions. We expect to get more questions than we are able to answer, if you still have questions after the chat, please contact the Autism Response Team at 888-288-4762. Thank you for your participation in today’s chat!
5:09
Comment From Jennifer  

Should a child be on an IEP if they have aspergers?

5:09
Hi Jennifer!
5:10
Yes, every child who has developmental concerns should have an IEP involving assessment that determine the child’s strengths and weaknesses
5:10
From there recommendations can be made to support the child in an educational program
5:11
Comment From Guest  

My child is being tested for Autism…He is 2 1/2. What should I expect with the tests?

5:11
Hello Guest
5:12
Good diagnostic assessment treat strengths and weaknesses including language, cognition and other skills
5:12
This will be very important in setting goals and intervention plans
5:12
Comment From Guest  

my grandson is almost 3 and I’m sure is autistic yet his parents won’t acknowledge it at all!! He needs help

5:12
Hi there!
5:13
This is a very common concern of grandparents
5:13
Sometimes it is difficult to know how to approach the parents so that they are open to taking the next steps
5:14
One approach is to recommend to the parents to get an evaluation
5:14
If there isn’t anything there, they can let it be. But if there is something, the child will benefit from early intervention
5:14
It might be good to suggest to them that you will accompany them to the assessment. The more support the better!
5:15
It is also good to give them time to process, but not TOO much time where the child loses the benefit of early intervention
5:15
Comment From Jesse  

My neice has Autism and Im wondering will she ever be able to function in the world when she gets older?

5:15
Hi Jesse
5:15
YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
5:15
It is well known that all children with autism make developmental progress
5:16
In terms of how much or how can not always be sure. It is up to the family to make sure the child gets high quality intervention and is in the correct setting. The more support the child gets, the better the outcome.
5:17
Comment From Traci  

I have sent 2 messages and they never show up

5:17
Hi Traci!
5:17
We are trying our best to answer everyone!
5:17
We are so happy that you are all here and asking questions
5:17
Comment From Sandy  

We’ve just been diagnosed yesterday. Our 5 year old son has ADHD and PDD-NOS. Our concern right now is that every resource around here has a 2-4 month wait period. I’m wondering what we can do now before the socialization groups are accessed.

5:17
Hi Sandy
5:18
Have you ordered the 100 Day Kit?
5:18
Here is a link, where you can download it for free
5:19
You may want to ask the professionals who evaluated your son what you can do at home in the meantime
5:19
The more the parents are involved in intervention, the better the outcome
5:19
Stress to the professionals that you need training on how best to intervene
5:19
Comment From Brandi  

HELP! Trying to decide between ABA therapy and floor time therapy. Pros and cons???

5:19
Hi Brandi!
5:20
In this case, you must ask, in what therapy will the child make the most progress?
5:20
Again, this comes out of good assessments in finding what the child’s strengths are
5:20
Based on that you should be able to pick the appropriate intervention that will garner the best outcome
5:20
Comment From Jennifer S  

We are about a month past our First 100 days and I wanted to thank you for our First 100 Days Tool Kit. It is priceless and an amazing resource. I carry it with me everywhere just to show people how amazing Autism Speaks is! Its a great way to get people excited about the walk, it shows where the money goes!

5:21
Hi Jennifer!
5:21
Thank you SO very much!
5:21
Our Mission At Autism Speaks, our goal is to change the future for all who struggle with autism spectrum disorders.
5:22
We want that kit in the hands of every parent at no cost
5:22
Families can call 888-288-4762 to get a hard copy of the kit
5:22
We love how valuable the kit was for you
5:23
Comment From Cynthia  

How can I explain my 5 year old that his brother has autism??

5:23
hi Cynthia
5:23
It is very important that parents explain to siblings that their brother or sister has autism
5:23
It is important to spend time talking with them and explaining what it means
5:24
It is also important to listen to their concerns without judgment
5:24
It is important that you establish the groundwork for an open communication
5:24
Let them know that is is okay to ask any questions and you will be there for them
5:24
The hard part is finding out what age appropriate terms you should use
5:25
I suggest you check out our resource library
5:25
We have lots of books that explain all of this to siblings
5:26
Comment From Emilio  

Hi everyone! Our 3 year old was diagnosed with High Functioning Autism at 2 years and, even before then, we knew something was different due to several milestones he was not making. We immediately began Early Intervention, At-Home Teaching and Training and now, because of our great community-based EI, OT and ST organizations, Artie is doing fantastic! He has made so much progress and is even enrolled in an ELP class and has fully integrated with Mainstream Students! We are SO proud of him! I cannot emphasize enough how important Early Intervention is and how important it is to work with your child at home!

5:26
Hi Emilio
5:26
I cannot emphasize enough how important early intervention is and involving parents.
5:26
THEY ARE KEYS TO SUCCESS!
5:26
Thank you for inspiring other parents with your successes
5:27
Comment From Patty  

What type of doctor is most qualified to make a diagnosis? Have been to 2 neurologists and still not completely comfortable w/their diagnosis.

5:27
Hi Patty
5:28
Starting with your pediatrician, you should be able to get a referral to a developmental pediatrician, neurologist, or psychologist
5:28
Because autism is a behavioral disorder, it is diagnosed through observation
5:28
and a careful history of the child
5:29
It is important to get a second opinion if you have additional questions about the diagnosis
5:29
There is no ‘one siz fits all” for autism spectrum disorders
5:30
Different professionals can see the child differently
5:30
Again, another reason to have more than one opinion.
5:30
Also keep in mind that no one knows your child better than you!
5:31
it is important to bring a support person with you to the evaluation to be sure you are hearing the same information
5:32
Then you can discuss this with the support person after the session. It can be very overwhelming and hard to absorb
5:32
Comment From Marilyn  

Hi my Daughter is 8 years and she just been diagnostic with autism

5:32
Hi Marilyn
5:33
Although this may considered a late diagnosis, you are welcomed to call and get the 100 Day Kit
5:33
It will help you still!
5:33
Comment From Guest  

How do I know the severity of my child’s Autism?

5:34
The process of doing an assessment when developing an IEP will provide us with a description of strengths and weaknesses
5:34
From there you will be able to set appropriate goals and intervention plans
5:35
Although many different healthcare professionals can diagnose autism, it is important that more than one disciplines be involved in assessing your child
5:36
This may not happen at one visit, but the professionals are communicating their prospectives with one another
5:37
This includes psychologist, OT, speech and language therapist, pediatrician, specialty physician, etc.
5:38
The value of these assessments is that the family take back information to the agency or school district so that the agency can better understand the child and advocate for them
5:39
Comment From monica  

iif a child has been diagnosed by doctors saying he’s pddnos but the school says different. what should I do?

5:39
Hi Monica
5:40
There are differences in opinion with diagnosis
5:40
It all traces back to the assessment process and understand those differences and why they exist
5:40
I would recommend that professionals speak to one another about this issue
5:42
Comment From Matt  

I have a problem with the concept of stimming

5:43
Hi Matt
5:43
Stimming is often considered odd repetitive motions that can be very apparent or more subtle
5:43
Unfortunately these behaviors can be very persistent and intense
5:44
The important thing is to understand that the behavior and consult with professionals in order to minimize the behavior that may be interfering with the child’s functional ability
5:44
The idea is to get help to manage the behaviors
5:45
Comment From Brian  

What symptoms can we look for in a child who may have autism?

5:45
Hi Brian!
5:46
The big three areas are communication, social symptoms, and repetitive behaviors
5:46
We have a page that goes into more detail on each
5:46
Comment From Guest  

my brother has autism and i was wondering does autism children have picky diets??

5:47
Hi There
5:47
Many people with autism are picky eaters or have aversions to certain foods
5:48
A great way to work on nutrition is to set up a regular structure for meal time
5:49
In that mealtime, include at least one food that your child has eaten in the past and liked
5:49
BUT also include a food that your child or sibling may have an aversion to
5:50
It’s a good idea to start discussing this with your family pediatrician
5:50
It is important the individual with autism is getting the right nutritional intake
5:51
Comment From Rhonda  

Please explain what things like PDD-NOS mean. Thanks

5:51
Hi Rhonda!
5:52
It is a form of autism spectrum disorder that meets the criteria that of a person with social difficulties, but not in both communication and restrictive repetitive behaviors
5:53
It can also be used to diagnose children under the age of three that don’t have clear difficulties
5:53
Comment From Sarah  

how often should children be re evaluated?

5:53
Hi Sarah!
5:53
This is a really good question
5:53
Typically children get evaluated annually through the IEP process
5:53
As parents you have a right to call an IEP meeting at any time
5:54
You can discuss your concerns – this may include an evaluation. That should be considered by the IEP team
5:55
We recommend parents work closely with their pediatrician and if parents have concerns, the pediatrician can support them in getting their child’s needs met
5:55
Comment From AnQi  

is the 100d ays kits free of charge?

5:55
Yes!
5:55
Anyone can download the Kit for free
5:56
You can request a hard copy of the 100 Day Kit by calling 888-AUTISM2 (888-288-4762). Parents of the child must request the kit.
5:56
We are so happy that we’ve had all of these participants, but are so very sorry we haven’t been able to answer everyone’s questions
5:57
You ALWAYS have the options of calling the Autism Response Team to speak to a coordinator at 888-AUTISM2 (888-288-4762).
5:57
It is so important that you all chose to come here to ask questions
5:57
By asking questions, you are providing vital stepping stones to ensure your loved one with autism has a successful future
5:58
Having a child with autism requires that we are comfortable doing more for our children
5:58
Active intervention on our part is a way of life!
5:59
Here is how you can get a kit
The 100 Day Tool Kit is available to download for free at:http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/100-day-kit
Aspergers /High Functioning Autism Tool Kit
http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/asperger-syndrome-and-high-functioning-autism-tool-kit
Manual de los 100 Dias
http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/manual-de-los-100-d%C3%ADas
Parents whose child has been diagnosed in the last 6 months may request a complimentary hard copy of the 100 Day Kit by calling 888-AUTISM2 (888-288-4762). Parents of the child must request the kit.
5:59
The 100 Day Kit is broken down by sections
6:00
1. About Autism- what to expect, define autism, what causes autism, prevalence2. You, Your Family & Autism- your family- addresses the family’s reaction to their child getting diagnosis, what you and extended family can do

3. Getting Your Child Services- navigating Early Intervention agencies, educational system,etc.

4. Treating Autism- different approaches to treatment, How is autism treated

5. Making It Happen-assembling your team, books ad websites
Appendix:
Action Plan for Next 100 days
Autism Safety Kit
Useful Forms
Glossary
Your local resources- Resources form RG: includes local resources: State Info, Schools, Waivers, Local Autism Orgs, AS Communities

6:00
In addition, another great resource is the Autism Video Glossary
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Online video glossary to help you identify the early signs autism I young children
Glossary contains 150 video clips, available free of charge. It helps to understand words and terms used to describe autism. It also showw examples of social reciprocity, Joint attention, Sensory defensiveness
6:02
Thanks again so much for being here – we look forward to the next chat with you!
6:02
Your advocacy truly makes a difference and we look forward to a future of open dialogue!

Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder

June 20, 2011 48 comments

Parents are usually the first to notice the early signs or “red flags” of autism spectrum disorder.  Maybe it was something different they noticed about their child at birthday party, or the child not developing like a sibling. What was the experience that led you to seek professional advice for your child?

How did you feel when you or your child received an autism diagnosis? What were your initial steps? What advice would you share with someone who has been recently diagnosed? 

The Autism Speaks 100 Day Kit and the Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism Tool Kit were created specifically for newly diagnosed families to make the best possible use of the 100 days following their child’s diagnosis of autism or AS/HFA.

Please join us Wednesday, June 22nd at 5 pm EST for ’100 Day Toolkit’ LIVE Facebook chat with the Family Services Staff. 

SPECIAL NEEDS LIFE QUALITY COACHING: A New Support for Families

June 16, 2011 10 comments

This is a guest post by Dr. Krysti DeZonia, a founding member of TERI (Training, Education, and Research Institute) and the CEO of the International Association for Life Quality.

Let’s start with a basic fact: Parents with kids who have autism need more help.

We simply aren’t able to access the degree of support we need in order to help our children, and ourselves, lead happy and fulfilling lives. We are stressed, tired, and looking for answers that don’t seem to be available to us.  It is, without question, time for a new model of family support.

We think we have at least part of the answer: Special Needs Life Quality Coaching.

For the uninformed, a Life Coach is someone who is trained to help you meet goals that you have been unable to attain without some help.  A Life Coach will assist you in designing an action plan to change careers, recharge your love life, or earn your first million.  They hang with you until you reach your goals.

After 30 years, when looking for a way to formalize our support for parents and expand it worldwide, Life Coaches came immediately to mind.  Upon further research, we found—to our great surprise—that no one is providing specific training to people so they can serve families whose children have special needs.  We closed this gap by designing, and offering, online Special Needs Life Quality Coach training.

Given that this is a completely new career path, we were uncertain whether our idea would, in reality, meet the unmet needs of families and individuals with autism and other special needs. We also weren’t sure who would be interested in taking the class and in starting a private practice in this field. Here’s what we have learned.

Almost every family we talk with is interested in having access to a Special Needs Life Quality coach.  There isn’t a need for too much explanation—they get it.

Our class is offered online and designed for working people, so anyone living anywhere can take it.  The hours are flexible, and the class gives students opportunities to have direct experience with families and their children or adults as well as with their local service delivery system.  By the end of the 16-week course, they have learned valuable coaching skills, have forms and other tools for documenting their progress, and are able to access follow-up support when they need it.

We also weren’t sure who would take our classes.  We have found that our students come from all walks of life, but are primarily professionals who already have a private practice and want to extend it (financial planners, attorneys, psychologists, etc.), educators, and parents or other family members. These are all people who see an unmet need and are anxious to fill it.

How hard has it been for coaches to find families who want their services? Not hard.  One of our coaches, Ben, had 16 interested clients after he posted a notice on a local autism forum—way more people than he could handle.  He specializes in helping individuals with autism develop social circles that will, hopefully, grow into friendships.  He’s having great success so far.

Our dream is that the help of a Special Needs Life Quality Coach will soon be as available to families and individuals with autism as is speech or occupational therapy.  Spread the word.

If you want to learn more about Special Needs Life Quality Coaching classes or services,  go to www.teriinc.org/ialq or call 760-721-1706.

Dr. Krysti DeZonia is a founding member of TERI (Training, Education, and Research Institute-www.teriinc.org) and is the CEO of the International Association for Life Quality. You can follow her blog at www.QandAwithDrK.com.

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