Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Geri Dawson’

New findings on risk of autism in siblings – What do they mean for parents?

August 15, 2011 56 comments

A message from Autism Speaks Chief Science Officer Geri Dawson, PhD

Parents of a child with autism are understandably concerned about the likelihood that their subsequent children will be affected. Autism Speaks and its legacy organization, the National Alliance for Autism Research, have been funding research on younger siblings for nearly 15 years– to help us better understand their development.

In 2003, we began organizing and co-funding a very special collaboration—the High Risk Baby Siblings Research Consortium—in partnership with Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health Development.

This week, we announced the results of the consortium’s largest ever siblings study. The researchers followed younger brothers and sisters from infancy through the preschool period, when autism diagnosis becomes possible.  The study revealed a markedly higher risk among younger siblings than had been previously reported.

As the autism community absorbs the news, let me give you some background on the quality and importance of this research—and what it means for parents.

Our “Baby Sibs” researchers are an international network of clinical researchers who have been pooling information from studies of affected families in 21 sites in the US, Canada, Israel and the UK. Alycia Halladay, Autism Speaks director of research for environmental sciences, and Andy Shih, vice president of scientific affairs, have led the consortium from the start and continue to coordinate its activities.

In the study making headlines this week, the consortium researchers assessed 664 infants. Each had at least one older sibling diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). They found that 1 in 5 babies with an older sibling on the spectrum will likewise be affected—more than double previous estimates. The rate was higher among younger brothers—1 in 4, versus 1 in 9 for younger sisters. And autism affected nearly 1 in 3 infants with more than one older sibling on the spectrum. (Previous estimates came out of much smaller and sometimes less reliably conducted studies.)

So what does this mean for parents?

If you have an older child on the spectrum and you are concerned about your infant, talk to your pediatrician about your baby’s risk and your desire for close monitoring. And if you have any concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait. Speak with your doctor about screening.

Here are links to a number of helpful resources:

* Recent research funded by Autism Speaks shows that a one-page baby-toddler checklist can be used effectively as early as 12 months as an initial screen for autism and other developmental disorders. The screener is available here.

* The American Academy of Pediatrics has long recommended that all children be screened for autism at their 18 month well baby checkups, using the M-CHAT toddler screener, available here.

* As a parent or caregiver, one of the most important things you can do is learn the early signs of autism and understand the developmental milestones your child should be reaching.  You can see the Learn the Signs guidelines on our website, here.

* Finally, families with one or more children on the spectrum can contact their nearest “Baby Sibs” consortium researcher if they would like to participate in this important research. The list is on our website, here.

By monitoring your infant closely and promptly beginning intervention if signs of autism appear, you can ensure that your child will have the best possible outcome.

Autism risk ‘high’ for kids with older sibling with the disorder. Autism Speaks’ Alycia Halladay, Ph.D., provides perspective of NPR’s All Things Considered. To listen to the segment, visit here.

A Message from Geri on Bangladesh

July 29, 2011 5 comments

Dear all,

I thought you might enjoy seeing a few highlights from Andy Shih and Michael Rosanoff’s recent efforts in Bangladesh. This is a country where resources are very low, and there is a great need to protect the rights and improve the treatment of people with autism.  Yet despite few resources, this country is stepping up to improve services for all people with autism in their country.  Saima Wazed Hossain from Bangladesh remarked at a recent United Nations meeting that, if Bangladesh can tackle the challenges of autism, any country can.  Indeed, it was Bangladesh that co-sponsored the UN conference that brought together leaders from many countries, the WHO, and key White House staff to focus on the needs of people with autism.

Andy and Michael, with the help of several experts from the US, are providing technical assistance and helping galvanize the Bangladesh government and other leaders to improve the lives of people with ASD.  What is noteworthy is that this effort requires very little in terms of money from Autism Speaks but can have a transformational effect on an entire country.

All best,
Geri Dawson, Chief Science Officer

Autism Conference Ends with High Hopes

The landmark autism conference ended in the city yesterday as its chief architect, Saima Wazed Hossain, hoped that the two-day meet would generate new hopes among the families in and outside the country. Read more …

Call for quality healthcare for persons with autism

An international conference on Autism Spectrum Disorders and Development Disabilities in Bangladesh and South Asia adopted the “7-point Dhaka Declaration,” with a call for promoting stronger coordinated actions in the region and globally. Read more …

Autism Meeting Ends with ‘Great Response’

The two-day international conference on autism concluded on Tuesday with pledges from the World Health Organization to support Bangladesh in autism care. Read more …

The next step toward treatment for the core symptoms of autism

June 23, 2011 6 comments

by Chief Science Officer of Autism Speaks, Geraldine Dawson, Ph.D.

I often get the question: How is the research we are funding on single gene disorders, such as Fragile X, relevant to the larger population of individuals with ASD?  My answer is that, although autism has many different causes – including single gene mutations, multiple genetic factors, and even environmental factors – it is likely that these causes affect common underlying biological pathways.  By studying the “simpler” single gene disorders, especially by studying animal models of these disorders, we can discover these pathways and develop medications that hopefully can help restore the functioning of these pathways.

As you will see in the press release, this strategy is being implemented by Seaside Therapeutics.  With the help of funding from Autism Speaks and NIH, Mark Bear and other scientists developed an animal model for Fragile X and discovered that glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, is affected by the Fragile X mutation.  An overabundance of glutamate is interfering with the ability of neurons to communicate with each other (synaptic functioning).   SeasideTherapeutics then tested a medicine, STX209 (arbaclofen), which helps to restore normal synaptic functioning, in a clinical trial with people with Fragile X.  They found encouraging results!  The next step, which was launched yesterday, is to test the efficacy of STX209 in individuals with ASD.  The hope is that this medicine will improve social behavior and reduce irritability (e.g. aggression, tantrums) in people with ASD.

In the press release Randall L. Carpenter, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Seaside Therapeutics says, “In our open-label Phase 2a study of STX209, we observed significant improvements in social impairment—a core symptom of autism spectrum disorders—including symptoms such as preference to be alone, being withdrawn or isolated, and lack of social reactivity. We are spearheading late-stage development of a drug candidate that has the potential to change the treatment paradigm for autism spectrum disorders—addressing core symptoms—and are truly excited about the prospect of helping patients and their families achieve an improved quality of life.”

Arbaclofen acts by stimulating the release of GABA in the brain. To make an simplified analogy, if we think of glutamate as the accelerator pedal in brain, then GABA is the brake pedal.   By reducing glutamate through stimulating GABA receptors, the first clinical trial with people who have Fragile X syndrome demonstrated positive effects on behavior.

In Phase 2b of the trial, 25 sites will conduct a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of arbaclofen, enrolling 150 people with ASD for a total duration of treatment of 12 weeks. For more information about the clinical trial visit www.clinicaltrials.gov .

We will be sure to keep you informed as this study and other translational research progresses!

Behind the Scenes with Chief Science Officer Geri Dawson, Ph.D. at IMFAR

Geraldine Dawson, Ph.D. became Autism Speaks’ first chief science officer in January of 2008. In this role, Dr. Dawson serves as the scientific leader of Autism Speaks, working with the scientific community, stakeholders, and science staff, to shape, expand, and communicate the foundation’s scientific vision and strategy. Dr. Dawson presented the Autism Speaks strategic plan on the second day of IMFAR. She also took the time to be interviewed by Wrong Planet’s Alex Plank.

UN Panel Will Focus on Solving the Autism Public Health Puzzle

April 6, 2011 2 comments

In celebration of the fourth annual United Nations World Autism Awareness Day, Autism Speaks is co-sponsoring a panel discussion today “Solving the Autism Public Health Puzzle: Regional and International Collaboration” at the United Nations beginning at 4:00 p.m. ET, with the Bangladesh Mission and the United States Mission. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon will open the meeting and panelists include Geri Dawson, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer at Autism Speaks, Shekhar Saxena, M.D., World Health Organization, Professor Saima Wazed Hossain, Chair of the National Advisory Committee on Autism in Bangladesh and Ms. Amy Gravino, Asperger’s Syndrome College Coach and Self-Advocate.

The event streamed live on the UN Webcast site.  We will update this post with a link to the video once it is available in an archived form.

Julie Walker sat down with Suzanne Wright on United Nations Radio to find out what drove her to become an autism awareness activist. Click here to listen to the interview.

Tune In – Autism Speaks on SIRIUS/XM Doctor Radio this Friday

August 3, 2010 1 comment

SIRIUS|XM, in conjunction with Autism Speaks, will broadcast Doctor Radio Reports: Understanding Autism – Looking for Answers, a two-hour live call-in show devoted to autism on Friday, August 6 from 10:00 a.m. to noon EDT. This segment, to run on the popular SIRIUS|XM Doctor Radio (SIRIUS Ch. 114 & XM 119) channel, is the second in a series on autism and science. The first aired on April 23. The latest show will again broadcast live and feature some the world’s premier autism experts coming together to share exciting breakthroughs in the world of autism research. Autism Speaks’ Asst. Director Science Communication and Special Projects, Leanne Chukoskie, Ph.D. will join guests including Melissa Nishawala, MD, Assistant Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at the NYU School of Medicine, Medical Director of Autism Spectrum Disorders Services at the NYU Child Study Center for a discussion moderated by journalist Perri Peltz. Dr. Chukoskie will be joined by leaders in the fields of genetic research, brain cell synapse function and innovative technology for autism. Listeners will be treated to a discussion on exciting new potential treatment that aims to correct a protein mutation at the synapse, which may lead to improvements in some of the core symptoms of autism. In addition, the audience will learn about innovative technology developments designed to improve an individual with autism’s ability to communicate and interact socially. As in the previous SIRIUS XM Doctor Radio autism program, there will plenty of time for listeners to call and direct their questions to the experts. Listeners can call 1-877-NYU-DOCS (I-877-698-3627) with questions. Tune in August 6 to get the latest autism information and get your questions answered. The show will also re-air on Saturday from noon-2 p.m.  and Sunday from 8-10 p.m. EDT.

If you don’t have SIRIUS|XM, you can register for a seven-day trial subscription for free.

Share

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,048 other followers

%d bloggers like this: