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‘Aging Out’: How Does the New Federal Health Care Law Impact Coverage for Young Adults?

December 14, 2011 1 comment

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed into law in 2010 by President Obama enables parents to carry their children on their health insurance policies up to age 26. How will this impact children with autism? Autism Speaks Government Relations intern Sara Baldwin offers an assessment.

As children with autism become young adults, many parents have concerns and confusion about their child’s health insurance coverage. The ACA will further change the landscape as its provisions are implemented over the next few years.

The age at which adults living with autism are no longer considered a “dependent” on their parents’ health insurance policy can have significant impact. Traditionally, once children reached the age of 19 they were no longer considered a “dependent” on their parents’ health insurance plan and coverage terminated. The only exception was for children who remained full-time students. For children with autism, though, traditional post-secondary education often might not be their next step, thus eliminating their ability to remain on their parents’ policy.

The ACA provides for young adults in any state to be covered on their parents’ health insurance until the age of 26 – and there is no requirement that the child remain in school or even live at home. But as the language of the ACA continues to be interpreted and applied, it is still important for parents to know what is available in their home state.

Prior to the enactment of the ACA in 2010, many states had already recognized the need to cover young adults and amended their laws to require that state-regulated health insurance plans cover dependents past age 19. While the ACA is a great advancement in addressing uninsured young adults – particularly those struggling with intellectual disabilities such as autism – some states provide more favorable coverage. Under the ACA, states are required only to change their laws to be in line with its requirements. Put another way – the ACA represents the minimum of what states must provide, but states can still provide coverage that is more favorable.

While most state laws establish a top age that is equal to, or slightly younger than, the ACA’s requirement, at least four states have more favorable coverage (with some restrictions):

 State

“Up to” Age

 Limits on Dependent:
New Jersey

30

Must have no dependents and reside in New Jersey
New York

30

Must be unmarried and reside in New York
Ohio

28

Must be unmarried and reside in Ohio
Pennsylvania

30

Must have no dependents and reside in Pennsylvania

Policy owners should be aware that state regulations apply only to fully funded insurance plans. If your company has a self-funded insurance policy, dependent coverage requirements will be governed by the ACA rather than state law. If you are unsure which type of policy your employer provides, you should contact your human resources department.

Disabled Dependents

Nearly all state laws allow dependents to remain covered indefinitely as long as they remain mentally or physically dependent, regardless of age. When looking into your state laws, you may find one of the following statements:

1.       The most common version, found in over 30 states, includes something similar to the following:
“…attainment of limiting age shall not operate to terminate the coverage of the child if at such date the child is and continues thereafter to be both (1) incapable of self-sustaining employment by reason of mental or physical handicap, as certified by the child’s physician… and (2) chiefly dependent upon such employee or member for support and maintenance.”
See, e.g., Con. Gen .Stat. Ann. § 38a-515.

2.       Other states include the following language within the statutory definition of a “dependent:”
“…an unmarried child of any age who is medically certified as disabled and dependent upon the parent.”
See, e.g., Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 10-16-102.

3.       Yet another simpler (and vaguer)version lists the limiting age and requirements for young adults and then says that coverage will also be extended to:
“…any other person dependent upon the policyholder.”
See, e.g., Del. Code Ann. Tit. 18, § 3303.

To whom, and how far, this “any other person” language extends is unclear. And despite the inclusion of “disabled dependent” language, the statutes alone do not tell parents how this language is interpreted or how the polices are implemented.

 If you have questions about coverage of your adult child with autism, contact your human resources department.  If they cannot answer your questions or if you lack confidence in their answers, call your state department of insurance.

The Month in Review: Autism Speaks November 2011 Impact

December 1, 2011 Leave a comment

Happy Thanksgiving and Happy Holidays to you and your family! This past month has been a whirlwind of activity here at Autism Speaks and we wanted take the opportunity to give thanks to the many collaborators who work with Autism Speaks in a variety of ways; from content partners to research providers to corporate sponsors and marketplace vendors – you all help us every day accomplish our vision and mission. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts and from the Autism Speaks staff and board.

Meanwhile, November was a busy month that featured global science outreach, an update to the resource guide and much more.

One of the common (and terrific!) questions we get is how does research help your child today. We recently posted a terrific blog about just that topic that we highly recommend you read!

“When it comes to helping our children and all those with autism, scientific evidence of benefit puts us on the road to affordable access to therapy. And that means better outcomes. This is what our families deserve and our mission supports.”

Have a wonderful holiday season with your family!

Science

Autism Speaks in Shanghai

  • To China, and Beyond! The science department’s highlights for November begin with the science leadership’s historic trip to Shanghai, China. Our colleagues there were eager to hear about new research and treatments being developed in North America. We were impressed with their technological prowess. In the coming year, the Beijing Genome Institute will be sequencing the DNA of families participating in our Autism Genome Resource Exchange (AGRE) program, allowing us to create the world’s largest whole genome sequence library for autism research.
  • Neuroscience Conference Update Our VP of Translational Research, Rob Ring, Ph.D., and Assistant VP Head of Medical Research Joe Horrigan, M.D., attended the annual conference of the Society for Neuroscience, which began with a special three-day satellite symposium on Autism Spectrum Disorders—from Mechanisms to Therapies. As part of the this symposium on translational research, Autism Speaks co-sponsored the publication of two watershed documents: SnapShot: Autism and the Synapse richly illustrates how 16 autism risk genes interact within and between cells that convey vital brain messages; SnapShot: Genetics of Autism summarizes knowledge on scores of autism-risk genes—both their normal functions and how their mutations increase the risk of certain autism sub-types and syndromes. Both documents are now available for free download from our science page.
  • Awards We are pleased to share the news that the American Public Health Association has bestowed the Rema Lapouse Award for exemplary work in psychiatric epidemiology to longtime scientific advisory committee member Ezra Susser. Ezra is also one of the powerhouses behind our initiative for Global Autism Public Health (GAPH). Congratulations Ezra!

Want to dig into Autism Speaks science even further? Visit the science section of our website, and read the latest blog posts from the science department.

Family Services

Enzo’s mom talks insurance

  • Updated… Autism Speaks Resource Guide This month, Autism Speaks launched the updated version of the Resource Guide, one of the most popular and valuable tools on our website that makes it easier for families to search for resources in their areas from early intervention services, to employment programs, to social skills groups, and much, much more!
    • The new version contains better URLs, updated resources, a bigger map, and the ability for families to share resources on Facebook and Google+.
    • Do you provide or are you aware of services in your area for individuals with autism? Let us know! The new Submit A Service form allows service providers to add their information to the Resource Guide, and gives families the opportunity to input information about resources they have found helpful in a simple and organized way.
  • Autism Speaks Live! Announced here for the very first time, we’re “re-branding” our live chats as “Autism Speaks Live” and developing even more exciting programming in 2012 for you to get educated, be entertained and to join the conversation. This past month we had several live chats including some new topics.
  • Office Hours: Family Services style Each Wednesday at 3PM EST, the Family Services team is available for Office Hours sessions to answer all questions from the Autism Speaks community. Join the conversation!

Stay up to date with the latest from Family Services in a variety of ways! Subscribe to our monthly “community connections” newsletter, Bookmark the Family Services page on our website or read Family Services related blog posts.

The Autism Response Team continues to answer hundreds of emails and phone calls each month from families and individuals with autism. If you have any questions or need assistance or information, please feel free to call us at 888-AUTISM2 or email us at familyservices@autismspeaks.org.

Advocacy

Autism Law Summit

  • A Better Life Parents saving for their child’s college education can take advantage of tax-free “529” accounts to prepare for the future. Parents raising children with autism or other disabilities could soon take advantage of the same tax-free mechanism if newly introduced bipartisan legislation is enacted by Congress. The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act was introduced in the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives with the support of Autism Speaks, The Arc, the National Down Syndrome Society and other leading disability advocacy groups. Under current federal law, individuals with autism risk losing all of their benefits if they have more than $2,000 in assets in their name.
  • Washington Watch The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has begun the process of implementing the sweeping federal health care reform law enacted in 2010, a process that could have profound consequences on how autism treatments are covered through insurance. The HHS is determining what services should be included in the “essential benefits” that health plans will be required to cover. Meanwhile, the Congressional “Super Committee” that was to recommend federal budget cuts collapsed without an agreement, placing in jeopardy significant future funding for autism research and services. Autism Speaks is closely monitoring these developments. You can too at our Federal Initiatives page.

Want to get more involved with Autism Speaks advocacy efforts? Sign up to become an advocate on www.autismvotes.org or text “AVotes” to 30644 to be added to our mobile alert list.

Awareness

  • New PSAs features Tommy Hilfiger and Jamie McMurray In early November, we launched our latest “Odds” PSAs with the Ad Council. Created pro bono by BBDO, the PSAs feature fashion icon Tommy Hilfiger and NASCAR driver Jamie McMurray, who both generously donated their time to help further the cause of autism awareness. Viewers are taken on voyages through Hilfiger and McMurray’s lives that highlight the extraordinary statistical odds they each overcame on the road to success compared to the startling one in 110 odds of having a child diagnosed with autism. The PSAs end by encouraging parents to visit autismspeaks.org/signs to learn the signs of autism and to seek early intervention if a delay is suspected.
  • Light It Up Blue in November! On November 29th San Francisco 49er Running Back Frank Gore and recording artists Pia Toscano & Andy Grammer participated in a holiday tree lighting at San Francisco’s famed 555 California Street. The free event was open to the public and benefited Autism Speaks.
  • Google+ Already a fan on Facebook, and a follower on Twitter? Circle us up on Google+ to complete the trilogy! We’re just getting started on Google+ and love how it even further connects us to you, our community!

Want to stay up to date on our awareness efforts? Visit the blog for the latest info… that page is also “RSS” enabled so you can add it to your newsreader!

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