Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Light It Up Blue’

Autism Speaks Kicks off “Light It Up Blue”

February 22, 2012 23 comments

In celebration of World Autism Awareness Day on April 2, Autism Speaks will again seek to turn the world blue. Our third annual Light It Up Blue initiative is fully underway with over 350 buildings already committed to turning blue.

Among the landmarks that will be turning blue on April 2, 2012 are Rockefeller Center, Top of the Rock Observation Deck and Madison Square Garden in New York City, Hôtel de Ville in Paris, France, the famous Tokyo Tower in Japan and Canada’s CN Tower, the Sydney Opera House in Australia and Michigan’s Mackinac Bridge.

Check out LightItUpBlue.org to register your events and see a full list of participating buildings.

Last year we had over 2000 buildings and landmarks turn blue. With your help, in 2012 we will more than double that number!!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Autism Speaks U “Light It Up Blue” LIVE Q&A Transcript

February 17, 2012 2 comments

On Thursday, February 16, our Autism Speaks U team hosted a LIVE Facebook Q&A for college students across the country. We discussed Light It Up Blue, World Autism Awareness Day, awareness/fundraising event ideas and shared links to awareness and promotions resources. If you were unable to join,  read below for the full transcript. Visit www.AutismSpeaks.org/U for more information.

4:59
Hi everyone, thanks for joining our LIVE Q&A! We’ll begin in 2 minutes.
5:02
This Q&A is intended for college students, faculty and staff.
5:02
It is text only – you’ll interact with us via the live chat client that you are logged into now. When you submit a question or comment there will be a delay from when it appears on the chat client.
5:03
Moderating this Q&A will be Sarah Caminker and Jaclyn Renner from Autism Speaks U.
5:03
Let’s do a roll call, so we know the schools that are being represented.Enter your school name and if you’re an undergrad, grad or staff.
5:03
Comment From Amanda

NYU

5:03
Comment From Theresa

SUNY Albany- undergrad

5:03
Comment From Rosalie

Seattle Pacific University, undergrad of psychology department

5:04
Comment From John

National Univ. San Diego

5:04
Comment From Elisse Bachman

Elisse Bachman, Graduate Student (’13): Bloomsburg Univ of PA (Bloomsburg, PA)

5:04
Comment From Guest

Liberty University – Undergrad

5:04
Comment From sharon moreno

VCU, Richmond, VA – parent of undergrad

5:04
Comment From Jessica

Appalachian State – undergraduate

5:04
Comment From Guest

University of Texas at Austin – undergrad

5:04
Comment From Guest

San Joaquin Delta College undergrade in early child development

5:05
Comment From Rob and LK @ Gettysburg

Co-founders and -presidents of Autism Speaks U Gettysburg College

5:05
Comment From Lori – staff

Bridgewater State University, MA

5:06
Comment From Aspen

Arizona State University Undergrad

5:06
Comment From Susan

Remington College of Nursing, faculty

5:06
Comment From Guest

Smith College, undergrad

5:06
Looks like we have a diverse group here! If anyone comes on later, please post your name and school.
5:07
Comment From Brookie

Meredith College Raleigh NC

5:07
Comment From Katrina Mesina

Chicago Autism Speaks Office

5:07
For those new to Autism Speaks U, it is a program that supports students who
-host awareness, advocacy and fundraising events
-start chapters
-become campus ambassadors.We have 50 official Autism Speaks U Chapters across the country and work with hundreds of students who host events!
5:07
Get more information at www.AutismSpeaks.org/U or email sarah.caminker@autismspeaks.org
5:07
This Q&A will include the following:
-Explanation of Light It Up Blue & World Autism Awareness Day.
-Overview of how to get your campus to participate.
-Event ideas and links to resources.
-Question and answer session.
5:08
Before we dive into our first topic, we’d like to ask….
5:08
Did you know that Monday, April 2 is Light It Up Blue and World Autism Awareness Day?
Yes: ( 73% )

No: ( 27% )

5:09
Thanks for the feedback.For those who answered no, Light It Up Blue is Autism Speaks 3rd annual awareness campaign, where iconic buildings, landmarks and schools across the world are asked to change their lights from white to blue on April 2nd in Honor of United Nations-sanctioned World Autism Awareness Day.
5:09
April 2nd also kicks off Autism Awareness Month which is all throughout April.
5:09
So what does this mean?April 2nd is a BIG deal, and we need your help to turn everything blue!
5:09
Last year, 150 colleges and universities across the country participated in Light It Up Blue by illuminating a building or structure or by hosting events on campus.
5:10
Did your school light it up blue last year?
Yes: ( 11% )

No: ( 89% )

5:10
Here are few images of buildings that went blue in 2011
5:10

Expand
UConn’s Wilbur Cross Building.
5:11

Expand
UC Berkeley’s Campanile
5:11

Expand
Colgate University’s campus chapel.
5:11

Expand
Case Western Reserve University’s Peter B. Lewis building.
5:11

Expand
The Great Buddah at Hyogo in Kobe, Japan. – We know it’s not a school, but this is one of our favorite pictures!
5:12
Other incredible monuments that lit it up blue last year include the Empire State Building, Niagara Falls, Sydney Opera House, Christ the Redeemer Statue, Tokyo Tower and more!
5:12
A new question for everyone…..please vote!
5:12
Is your school planning to light up a building/monument blue this year?
Yes: ( 48% )

No: ( 52% )

5:13
If you answered no, here are 5 easy ways to get your school to participate in Light It Up Blue.
5:13
1. Decide what building you want to light up blue. Determine this BEFORE you ask your school to participate, so you’re prepared when meeting with faculty and staff.
5:13
2. Contact your school’s President and Student Activities Director to ask them to participate. Do this via email or by making an in-person appointment.
5:13
Download a sample letter template that you can modify and send to your school athttp://bit.ly/liubletter.
5:14
3. See if there’s an Autism Speaks U chapter (http://bit.ly/chapterlist) or one of our national philanthropic partners (Αlpha Xi Delta http://bit.ly/azdlistings & Theta Delta Chihttp://bit.ly/tdxcharges) at your school. If so, contact them and work together!
5:14
4. Ask different academic department heads (Psychology, Education, Communication, Speech & Hearing, etc.) to work with you and the school administration to light up your campus blue.
5:15
5. Explain to your school WHY it is important to Light It Up Blue.
5:15
For example, 1 in 110 individuals are on the spectrum and a new case is diagnosed every 15 minutes. All the more reason to educate your campus about this prevalent disability.
5:16
Your campus will also be aligning themselves with prestigious schools, such as Cornell University, Johns Hopkins University, Northwestern, UC Berkeley and Penn State who lit up their campuses blue last year.
5:16
Now….HOW do you actually light up the building blue? There are 2 ways.
5:16
1. The school purchases blue bulbs from a hardware and lighting supply stores and replaces the white bulbs with blue ones.
5:17
Contact your school’s facilities manager for specific details on what type of lights you will need.
5:17
2. Place gels, filters or blue cellophane over the existing lights. These can be purchased from a local lighting supply store.
5:18
A few tips about the gels/filters…
5:18
If the installed lights are very bright white light, then it is recommended to use Roscolux #80 Primary Blue.If the lights have a medium intensity or the surface isn’t highly reflective, use Roscolux #68 Sky Blue.
5:18
The school’s facilities manager will be able to discuss this in more detail, but it’s helpful to have this information on hand.
5:18
If unable to light up a building blue there are other ways to have your school participate.
5:19
If there is an electronic marquee on your campus ask them to display the Light It Up Blue logo and announce that it is World Autism Awareness Day.
5:19

5:19
Encourage students, faculty and staff to all wear blue on April 2, or on another designated day in April. Gather everyone together, take a picture and send it to us!
5:19

5:20
Get a banner hung cross campus or near student housing to let everyone know that it’s World Autism Awareness Day.
5:20

5:20
Does your school have a well-known statue, monument or mascot? If so, decorate it with Autism Speaks U banners, gear and blue balloons!
5:20

5:20
Deck out the campus in blue. See how one school got approval to paint their campus’ tunnel.
5:21

5:21
There are SO many different ways to light up your campus blue! Be creative, think outside the box and don’t forget to send us pictures!
5:22
Now for a QUESTION….please submit a response
5:22
What building(s) or monuments are you planning to light up blue?
5:22
Comment From Caitlyn

The student center

5:22
Comment From Guest

Library, student center, and quad

5:23
Comment From Guest

Dorms

5:23
Comment From Lori – staff

I would love for the University to light up the main administrative building ~ Boyden Hall.

5:23
Comment From Rosalie

Demaray Hall Clocktower

5:23
Comment From Jessica

Mascot statue and our university’s main sign

5:23
Comment From Kimberly

Hey something I haven’t seen … let’s try and get towns or cities lite up blue that day

5:23
Comment From Rob and LK @ Gettysburg

Our main historic Building, Penn hall

5:24
Comment From Guest

I would like to light up College Hall here at Smith College, MA. It is very visible.

5:24
Comment From Theresa

I requested my school to light of the University Hall which is the first building you would see if you walked onto campus or the Campus Center

5:24
Comment From Kasia

We have a building that is a historic building here that just got new led lights so the building is always lit up and they can make them change different colors.

5:24
Comment From Susan

Will encourage everyone to wear blue April 2nd

5:24
Comment From Guest

Main building

5:24
Comment From Jasmine

The preschool I work for, the quad at the college and my house!

5:24
Comment From Kasia

Possibly our Mountaineer statue as well

5:24
Comment From Theresa

University Hall or the Campus Center

5:25
Comment From Guest

We are planning on having a block party on April 2nd. We’ll be having blue bracelets that light up, so we can do a countdown for sunset and have students light theirs up then.

5:25
Comment From Mike

We’re lighting up all the dinning halls on campus blue

5:26
Comment From Brooklyn at ISU
I love that block party idea
5:26
In addition to lighting up a building blue, host an event on April 2, or throughout the month of April!
5:26
To start, download our Light It Up Blue cards at http://bit.ly/liubcards.
5:26

5:27
Print these out and distribute the cards outside the buildings that are lit blue. They are a great way to raise awareness!FYI….we’ll be listing all available materials in a few minutes.
5:27
Event ideas can include, but are not limited to:
5:27
Bake sales
Autism Speaks wristband sale
Blue cupcake eating contest
Walk/run
5:27
Blue hair extensions booth
Spare change campaign
Zumbathon
T-shirt sales
Blue flower sale
5:28
One of our favorites….a blue cake pop fundraiser!
5:28

5:28
They’re easy to make and a big hit. Download the cake pop recipe at http://bit.ly/bluecakepops.
5:29
Or try a puzzle piece campaign.
5:29

5:29
Set up a table on campus and sell puzzle piece cards to students, faculty and staff. Whoever purchases the card, signs his/her name and display the cards in your Student Center.
5:30
Attach fact cards to blue flowers and sell them on campus throughout April. It’s a great way to raise awareness and brighten someone’s day.
5:30

5:31
For more event suggestions, download our “A through Z Event Ideas” guide athttp://bit.ly/q4Ex0w.
5:33
Another QUESTION for everyone….what awareness and fundraising events are you planning for Light It Up Blue & World Autism Awareness Day?
5:34
Don’t be shy….what events are you planning on April 2nd?
5:34
Comment From Rob and LK @ Gettysburg

trying to get the entire campus to wear blue, trying to light up a couple buildings, facts will be written throughout the ground in crayon, and we will be passin out info cards as well as wrapping trees up in blue tape

5:35
Comment From Mike

We’re having an all blue relay race on campus. $20 a team to register. The team with the most creative uniform wins a gift card which was donated.

5:35
Comment From Guest

We are getting shops around the university to post facts, make donations, and decorate their stores blue throughout the month of April.

5:35
Comment From Caitlyn

I was thinking a run/walk race and if that wasn’t possible an Autism Awareness BINGO night where the prizes would be blue

5:35
Comment From Jasmine

I plan on baking blue treats, cupcakes, cookies, cakepops and getting crafty by making blue flower headbands. Also, I plan on wearing blue as much as possible through out April! My 4 yr old son has autism and he makes my whole world a better place!

5:35
Comment From Lori – staff

My hope/plan is to get the involvement started at my campus! I love the ideas people are posting though!!

5:36
Comment From Susan

Blue Sidewalk chalk might be cool

5:36
Comment From Anna

We’re setting up a blue hair extension booth from April 2-6 on campus.

5:36
Comment From Lakesha

A scavenger hunt using puzzle pieces as clue cards, having students and faculty wear blue and having a walk.

5:36
Comment From Theresa

Aside from having a building lit up blue, we are trying to get everyone to wear blue and I was having trouble coming up with an idea but I really love the idea of the cake pop fundraiser attached to fact cards. And Sunday April 1st is our walk.

5:37
Comment From Caitlyn

Also I was thinking of painting a bunch of puzzles blue and hiding the pieces around our student center and the library and the person with the most pieces got a prize

5:37
Comment From Vicky Cid

we will be wrapping trees in blue ribbon, posting fact puzzle pieces into the ground with stakes, chalking facts onto the ground, lighting up a building blue, teaming up with our student body to hold awareness events like a blueberry pie eating contest, trivia bowl, etc… and teaming up with a local bar to raise funds

5:37
Comment From Rosalie

Will try to light up the buidling, blue ribbons around trees, mass emails to student to wear blue, and a fundraiser

5:38
Comment From Kasia

We are celebrating the entire week. We’re going to get a banner and have people sign but I’m liking the puzzle piece campaign better. Selling blue or puzzle piece printed ribbon. Selling wristbands. Giving out prizes to people we see wearing blue in support. Try to do a walk and have a game night. Having a guest speaker. On the 2nd we are also having a party (if the weather is nice) out by the building that we are lighting up blue.

5:38
Comment From Jasmine

My house will be decorated with Light It Up Blue and blue decor inside and out!

5:39
Comment From Michelle

We’re having a powder-puff football game with a few different sororities on campus. All the funds raised go to Autism Speaks! We’re getting the Greek Council & Student Government Assoc. to encourage everyone to attend.

5:39
All awesome ideas! There is one GREAT way to promote your events and that is through texting.
5:39
How many emails do you open? 1 out of every 10.How many text do you open? ALL
5:40
Send a text to 10 people. Include the event info. and ask them to forward the text on to 10 of their friends.
5:40
Create a text messaging campaign to increase attendance and funds raised!
5:41
Comment From Will

That’s a great idea! I never thought of that.

5:41
We’re excited for all you have planned.
5:41
Please remember to send pictures to autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org of your events and campus lit up blue!FYI, since photos tend to be large, only send one photo per email.
5:42
Once your event is confirmed, we’ll send out awareness materials and a banner. Email autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org your name, mailing address, event name/time/date/location.
5:42
A few additional tips….
5:42
1. Distribute awareness materials outside the building being lit up, so students connect the color blue to autism and Autism Speaks U.
5:42
2. Remember to take pictures! Contact your school’s newspaper or photography club and ask them take a high resolution picture of the building being lit blue and of your events.
We promote all of the schools that we receive pictures from.
5:43
3. Don’t start from scratch…use our promotional materials to get the word out!
5:43
Click the links below to download the items and print them off.
5:44
Side note: We’ll be posting the transcript from this Q&A later on the Autism Speaks U Facebook (www.facebook.com/autismspeaksu), so you’ll be able to access the links again.
5:44
Customizable Light It Up Blue Posters
• 8.5 x 11 poster- http://bit.ly/liubposter1
• 11 x 17 poster- http://bit.ly/liubposter2
5:44
•How To: Light It Up Blue Flyer- http://bit.ly/liubflyer
• This offers ideas for how you can get your campus involved.
5:44
Light It Up Blue Fact Cards – http://bit.ly/liubcards
5:45
These cards were just made for Autism Speaks U & Light It Up Blue, so use them!
5:45
Autism Speaks U Quarter Cards – http://bit.ly/quartercards
5:45
Fact & School Cards – http://bit.ly/vefknD
5:45
Autism Speaks U Handout – http://bit.ly/xfp6fq
5:46
Remember to email autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org when your school CONFIRMS what building will be lit up and/or you have a confirmed event planned for Light It Up Blue.
5:47
We promote all the schools that participate in Light It Up Blue and want to include your campus!
5:47
We have a few minutes left, and wanted to take one more poll, before we open it up to questions.
5:47
Do you prefer attending a monthly Facebook Q&A or would you rather have a monthly conference call?
Conference call: ( 11% )

Facebook Q&A: ( 89% )

5:49
Good to know that we all love Facebook!
5:49
Now, please ask any questions about what was discussed or about the Autism Speaks U program.
5:50
We’ll share these questions, so everyone can learn from each other. If you have tips/suggestions please provide those as well.
5:50
Comment From Kim

If I’m having trouble getting my school to Light It Up Blue, who should I contact?

5:50
Kim, please contact your school’s president and/or student activities director. Download a sample letter template that you can modify and send to your school at http://bit.ly/liubletter.
5:51
Comment From Mojdeh

How long does it take to start an Autism Speaks U chapter?

5:51
Mojdeh, it can take some students 1-2 months, while 6 months+ for others. It depends on your school’s process, and if you finish all the required Autism Speaks U paperwork.
5:51
Comment From Isabel

If we’re having an event can we use the Autism Speaks U logo on our flyer?

5:52
We have a specific Autism Speaks U logo that is used for people hosting events. Please email jaclyn.renner@autismspeaks.org, explain your event and we’ll provide the correct logo.
5:53
We do ask that you submit a proof to us of ALL items using the Autism Speaks U logo before it gets printed/distributed.
5:53
Comment From John

To Kim, I have found that getting the Local TV station involved can sometimes push things in the right direction.. Be Nice…

5:53
Comment From Lakesha

I am having trouble getting my school to light it up. The presidents secretary is not letting us get through, and other faculty are not showing up to meetings we have scheduled to talk about plans

5:54
We have had students email the school President directly and explain WHY it is important to light it up blue. Explain to them what this day/campaign means. You can also CC other school administration on the email, so they are appear about it as well.
5:54
Comment From Jasmine

If I host an Autism Awareness/Light It Up Blue party at my house, will you still be willing to send banners and additional materials?

5:55
Absolutely! Email us the details.
5:55
Comment From Kasia

As far as selling t-shirts are we allowed to sell the shirts from the website or does it have to be designed that we created to sell?

5:56
You can sell shirts from the website or from other places that you purchased them. Completely up to you!
5:56
Comment From Kim

John- That’s a great idea. I was thinking of contact our school and local news paper and TV station to see if they would publicize what we’re trying to do.

5:56
Comment From Mojdeh

How to you go about getting sponsors for events? My school has said that once my chapter is approved I am given $200 for the year.

5:58
Contact local businesses, restaurants, shops, etc. Stop by stores close to campus and explain to them what a sponsor for your event/chapter would entail.
5:58
Access our sponsorship guide at http://bit.ly/o2REod.
5:58
It’s a great resource!
5:59
We’re just about out of time. Thank all of you for participating in our Q&A!
5:59
It’s fantastic to see college students so involved in raising awareness and advocating for the autism community.
5:59
Remember to check out www.AutismSpeaks.org/U for more information!
5:59
If we didn’t get to your question or you have a few more, email us at autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org.
6:00
Thanks, and have a great night!

LIVE Facebook Q&A for College Students on Light It Up Blue!

February 13, 2012 2 comments

The Autism Speaks U team will be hosting a LIVE Facebook Q&A for college students, on Light It Up Blue and Autism Awareness Month this Thursday, February 16 at 5pm EST/2pm PST. 

RSVP at http://on.fb.me/rsvpfeb or join the chat directly at http://on.fb.me/febchat.

Our team will discuss how to get started and ways to get your campus to Light It Up Blue. Plus, you’ll have the opportunity to share ideas with other students from across the country.

We look forward to chatting with you!

To see how you can get involved with the program, visit www.AutismSpeaks.org/U.

Tune-in to ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition”

October 27, 2011 6 comments

Tune-in to ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” (EMHE) Friday, October 28, at 8:00 p.m., ET, for an episode featuring the McPhails, an Oregon family with two sons affected by autism. In addition to tackling home improvements, the EMHE team worked with Autism Speaks to rally the local community to raise autism awareness in honor of the family.

Fourth Annual World Focus on Autism

September 22, 2011 4 comments
(Back, L to R) Mr. Hassan Ali Bin Ali – Qatar, Mrs. Emine Erdoğan – Turkey, Mme. Raymonde Goudou Coffie – Côte d’Ivoire, Mrs. Valeria Toribiong – Palau, Dr. Pentti Arajärvi – Finland, Mrs. Barbara Miklič Türk – Slovenia, Mrs. Sandra Thomas – Grenada, Dr. Liri Berisha – Albania, Mrs. Natalia Gryshchenko – Ukraine, Mrs. Eloise Gonsalves – Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Prof. Saima Wazed Hossain – Bangladesh, Dr. Cecelia McCarton – The McCarton School, Mme. Ilham Hussain – Maldives, Mrs. Elsie Christofia – Cyprus, Mrs. Rosella Nestor King – Saint Lucia, Ms. Sue Herera – CNBC (Front, L to R) Mrs. Penehuipifo Pohama – Namibia, Mrs. Sarah Wescot-Williams – Saint Martin, Mrs. Shiranthi Rajapaksa – Sri Lanka, Mrs. Ban Soo-taek – Wife of the Secretary General of the UN, Mrs. Suzanne Wright – Autism Speaks, Mrs. Lorna Golding – Jamaica, Dr. Patience Faka Jonathan – Nigeria, Mrs. Hannah Jurelang Zedkaia – Marshall Islands, Mrs. Ingrid Bouterese – Suriname

For the fourth year in a row Autism Speaks brought together first spouses and esteemed dignitaries, including ministers of health, from more than 30 countries around the globe for the Fourth Annual World Focus on Autism. The event, held on Tuesday, September 20, 2011, was part of an ongoing effort to raise global awareness and share best practices for countries, communities and families struggling with this non-discriminative disorder.

Mrs. Ban Soon-taek, wife of the U.N. Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, in her fourth year of attendance joined event hosts Suzanne and Bob Wright of Autism Speaks. Additional distinguished guests included event Co-host Dr. Cecelia McCarton, executive director and founder of The McCarton Foundation and the McCarton School, and emcee Sue Herera of CNBC’s “Power Lunch.”

Attendees convened at The McCarton School, which provides an educational program for children with autism by using an integrated one-to-one model of therapy grounded in Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) combined with speech and language therapy, motor skills training and peer interaction. “This school has given so much to our children with autism, and we wanted each of you to experience it firsthand today,” said Suzanne Wright. “It’s here under this roof that the meticulous work to connect with our children with autism takes place.”

United in a global cause, a record number of dignitaries attended, including the first spouses of Albania, the Republic of Cyprus, Finland, Grenada, Jamaica, the Republic of the Maldives, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Namibia, Nigeria, the Republic of Palau, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, and Turkey.

Guests toured the school and met with students, who made glass bead necklaces for the visiting first spouses. Later, the dignitaries assembled to learn about Autism Speaks’ global initiatives – including the annual World Autism Awareness Day celebrated on April 2 and Autism Speaks’ Light it Up Blue campaign; as well as Autism Speaks’ Global Autism Public Health (GAPH) initiative. GAPH initiatives championed by individual countries, as well as regional efforts including the South-East European Autism Network (SEAN) and the South Asian Autism Network (SAAN) were highlighted during the event.

In her opening remarks, Mrs. Ban Soon-taek welcomed the international group on behalf of her husband U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon stating, “autism touches so many in the world, no matter where they live, no matter how much money they have, no matter their religion, no matter their gender. And like a pebble in a pond, the effects of autism ripple outward to parents, siblings, and caregivers. Autism is at once deeply personal and truly global.”

Speakers at the event included distinguished guests Dr. Liri Berisha, spouse of the Prime Minister of Albania; Dr. Ante Zvonimir Golem, Croatia’s State Secretary for Health and Social Welfare; Professor Saima Wazed Hossain, daughter of the Prime Minister of Bangladesh; and Professor A.F.M. Ruhal Haque, MP, F.R.C.S, Bangladesh’s Minister of Health and Family Welfare; as well as Autism Speaks Vice President of Scientific Affairs Dr. Andy Shih. Each speaker offered remarks on the significance of fostering global partnerships in combating the global public health crisis of autism.

=

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

‘World’s First Ladies Take on Autism’ in the The Wall Street Journal.

LIVE Q & A Transcript with Co-Founder Suzanne Wright

September 22, 2011 3 comments

Suzanne and Bob Wright are co-founders of Autism Speaks, the world’s largest autism science and advocacy organization. Inspired by the challenges facing their grandson, who suffers from autism, they launched the foundation in February 2005.

Suzanne has an extensive history of active involvement in community and philanthropic endeavors, mostly directed toward helping children. She is a Trustee Emeritus of Sarah Lawrence College, her alma mater. Suzanne has received numerous awards, the Women of Distinction Award from Palm Beach Atlantic University, the CHILD Magazine Children’s Champions Award, Luella Bennack Volunteer Award, Spirit of Achievement award by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine’s National Women’s Division and The Women of Vision Award from the Weizmann Institute of Science.

In 2008, Suzanne and Bob were named in Time 100’s Heroes and Pioneers category, for their commitment to global autism advocacy. They have also received the first ever Double Helix Award for Corporate Leadership from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, the NYU Child Advocacy Award, the Castle Connolly National Health Leadership Award and the American Ireland Fund Humanitarian Award. In the past couple of years the Wrights have received honorary doctorate degrees from St. John’s University, St. Joseph’s University and UMass Medical School – they delivered respective commencement addresses at the first two of these schools. The Wrights are the first married couple to be bestowed such an honor in St. John’s history.

The Wrights have three children and five grandchildren.

Click here to read A Grandparent’s Guide to Autism.

12:59
Hi – I’m Suzanne Wright – Co-founder of Autism Speaks and I’m so happy to be joining this web chat today!
1:00
Comment From James McDonald

Good Afternoon

1:00
Comment From sha

thankyou for your time

1:00
Comment From Lucas mom

hi

1:01
I’m here today as Christian’s grandmother – and I’d like to talk about my role as a grandparent and advocate.
1:01
Comment From donna

Good Afternoon all

1:02
We are so excited about our new toolkit which is a grandparent’s guide to autism which can be downloaded for free on our autismspeaks.org website.
1:03
Comment From Emily

Hi Suzanne, I have a brother with Autism and just want to say thank you for your time you put into Autism Speaks.

1:04
Hi Emily.  Thanks for your kind words – I do this for Christian and for all families and individuals affected by autism.  Thanks for joining our discussion today.
1:06
Comment From Lalania Lind

I have a question. Did your family find it hard to get help from the education system for Christian?

1:09
Hi Lalania – very much so. Here is a guide that we provide from autism speaks – a School Community Tool Kit which can give you some advice – and an our IEP – Individual Education Program toolguide – which provides process and practical tips to knowing your child’s rights.
1:09
Comment From Carol

Hello Suzanne! Thank you for coming on to talk with us grandparents today. I was wondering what activities you like to do with Christian.

1:11
Hi Carol! We love to swim with Christian… he loves to go to the playground, he loves to go to the beach and swim in the waves, and he just made a beautiful little necklace for me so we’re starting on some arts and crafts these days.
1:11
Comment From Melissa

My son’s grandmother is a great advocate for our son. He’s now 8 and enrolled in a private Christian school here in Atlanta after spending 3 years in an intensive program at Emory University. I could talk to you all day about all the things she’s done for him and for us. Thank you to Autism Speaks for first jumpstarting our family into seeking treatment for our son back in 2005.

1:13
Melissa, hi. You have a wonderful mom. Speaking as a mom I knew from the get go just how important it was to be there not only for my grandson, but for his parents as well. We are glad that Autism Speaks was able to help your family at a very sensitive and critical time.
1:13
Comment From Sally

How do I share my time with my other grandchildren?

1:15
Hi Sally. This is VERY important. Not only for the sibling of the child affected but for the little cousins too. We as a family take turns with Christian when we are all together so I can spend some time with his brother and cousins. I must say that they are beginning to understand what autism is, and I do spend time trying to explain why special needs.
1:15
Comment From Annie

This Halloween we will trick or treat for Autism Speaks and ask for donations in lieu of candy! My 3 yr old son, Jamey doesn’t like candy, but he is autistic and that’s how I came up with this idea.

1:16
Hi Annie – We LOVE your idea and we’ll be posting it on our website!! I love the fact that you found a way to celebrate Halloween in your own special way.
1:16
Comment From patricia chabra

I am PAtricia Chabra,I have two son with ASD disorder,I have been doing autism walk for years,advocating for children and adults affected,you are such a mentor and inspirational person suzanne,god bless you

1:17
Hi Patricia – even though it’s not possible for me to be at every walk I am always there in spirit. I’m glad to be connecting with you now here – thank you for all your kind words and God Bless you too.
1:19
Comment From Donna McCombs

First, Thank you for giving your time to us for this chat. How can I teach my daughter’s grandparents to be more understanding about her disorder?

1:21
Hi Donna – our new Grandparent Tool Kit addresses this very issue. It will absolutely give you pointers on how to interact with the other set of grandparents who may be as supportive as your own parents. I really hope this helps – I know how difficult it is.
1:21
Comment From Stephanie

I have a grandson named Jaylin and we have been trying to find him weighted blanket he gets to hot if we put the ones he want but wont sleep without them so we was told about the blanket just cant find them.

1:22
Hi Stephanie – we have a list of sensory products on our website.
1:22
Comment From mark

hi Suzanne!:) im mark from the philippines. i’m glad about organizations such as Autism Speaks and really appreciate the facebook account. I have a brother with autism; just wondering, Whats the latest research in autism, such as its cause or new teaching methods given to autistic children?

1:24
Hi Mark! I’ll give you a link to our science which contains the most up to date and cutting edge science news. On another note we have our Light It Up Blue campaign which runs worldwide during the month of April. Can you help me light up some buildings in the Philippines blue?? We want to light up the world!
1:24
Mark – I hope your brother is doing ok.
1:25
Comment From Melanie Hobbs

Hi Suzanne and other parents/grandparents! LOVE Autism Speaks and the Light it up Blue campaign. One thing I’d love to see is resources and ideas for grandparents for toys/gifts. My son is 9 and there are tons of “autism toy” ideas for younger kids, but I would love to find more ideas for older kids. When it comes to birthday time, Grant’s grandparents are always at a loss (and sometimes I am too!). :)

1:26
Hi Melanie! First, thanks for helping us to Light It Up Blue! We actually have a Toys R Us online guide which was specifically created for differently-abled kids.
1:27
Comment From Melissa

It was actually the Autism Speaks series on NBC back in February 2005 that made us realize what we had been dealing with for 18 months despite protests from our pediatrician to the contrary. Our son was then diagnosed with classic autism that April. He’s now mainstreamed with no educational supports, is on the A honor roll, and has become a bit of a musical prodigy much to our delight. We just recently told him about his autism and he’s still wrapping his head around it. We are finding his classmates are beginning to notice his social and behavioral differences and wondered if AS had any suggestions on how to explain what autism is to young non-sibling children.

1:30
Hi Melissa – great question. There’s portion of our School Community Tool Kit devoted to peers. I’m so happy that you were able to see our Autism Speaks series on NBC. In Feb. 2005 no one was talking about autism – now we have our country but the world talking about it. If you are not familiar with our Light it Up Blue campaign I’d love to have your help to shine a light on autism.
1:31
Comment From Sally

At this point in my life it is too hard for me to talk “live” with other grandparents. Are there any Grandparent support chat rooms?

1:33
Hi Sally. We would love for you to check out the grandparent autism network – which provides support and resources for grandparents.
1:33
Comment From Guest

Hi I’m Flo from Germany. I am an SLP who has worked with autism fro many years. It is so encouraging to be able to use the web to support families affected by ASD.

1:35
Hi Flo. Yes it is very encouraging – what would we do with the internet. Please be sure to connect with us on all of our social networks. And also – help us light Germany up blue!
1:37
I need grandparents!! I feel we should have the support of the AARP with the numbers being what they are; 1 in 70 boys and 1 in 110 children. Thousands of grandparents without question are affected by autism. Here is a link to the President of the AARP: the Board.
http://pubs.aarp.org/aarpannualreport/servicesincar2010?folio=18#pg18Please ask them to help Autism Speaks and our grandparent community to raise awareness about the issues that affect our children and grandchildren with autism by making our grandparent tool kit(http://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/a_grandparents_guide_to_autism.pdf) available on their website and feature an article on autism in their AARP Magazine during the month of April, Autism Awareness Month.
1:40
It’s so important that the AARP join Autism Speaks – because autism affects everyone – the child, the parents, the siblings, the friends, the teachers, and the Grandparents – who often become the child’s emotional rock.
1:43
Comment From Lania

But how do you get a grandparent to come out of denial? We have been trying for years to help our daughters grandparent that she has autism, but she just will not believe us or the doctors.

1:44
Hi Lania – you know, everyone deals with the diagnosis differently, and I certainly feel for your situation. We have a 100 Day Kit which helps families through the newly diagnosed period. As part of the 100 Day Kit – we have a “Learn the Signs” section describes the hallmark signs of autism in detail. So maybe presenting this information to your daughter’s grandparent will help them understand the diagnosis of autism better.
1:46
Comment From Donna McCombs

Our grandparents on both sides say that if she had more discipline she would not have any behavior issues.

1:46
Donna – the misconception is that aspects of autism is about lack of discipline. This is not the case. Please go to our Learn the Signs and our Grandparent tool kit – I really hope this helps.
1:48
You can learn the signs here! http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/learn-signs
1:52
It has been such a wonderful experience chatting with so many of you today. I really hope that our Autism Speaks website offers you the resources that you need as you navigate through the complexity of living with autism. Know that we are here for you and appreciate all your support. The more people who know about autism will be more willing to help ALL families everywhere. And we can raise the global consciousness by lighting up the world blue in April. Thank for the opportunity to chat with all of you today. Happy Autumn Day. Suzanne Wright

A Letter From Denmark

August 4, 2011 2 comments

This photo post was submitted by Camilla to our Flickr page all the way from Denmark during the Light It Up Blue Campaign.

Hello,

Thank you for being on Facebook and thank you for letting me share my picture of my wonderful son.

My son was diagnosed four weeks ago, infantile autism/ADHD and Verbal Tics. I love him to death and there is nothing I wouldn’t do for him. My battle of having someone to listen to me and help me, to figure out,why “normal” books about bringing up a child never worked. I had to invent a million other ways, trial and error,  to connect and finally, four weeks ago this ended.

To be told, that the last almost 11 years, was not me being a silly, first time mother, who since the day he was born, felt that there was something that was not as it was supposed to be, really was harder than I thought it would be. But at least now we have a diagnosis. We can only do even better from here on and help my son to improve in so many ways. My son is very lucky, that he also is very, very smart, which will help him a lot now when we are to learn the “how to’s” for so many things.

I am blessed, and I thank you guys for having a Facebook page. I have been reading a lot of articles posted by you, which have been very helpful in this early process of taking the news and dealing. But also to help me and my son to move forward and to learn from others’ experiences.

Here is a picture of me and my son, taken last year, and I really hope the White House, will show it’s true blue colors April 2 2012.

Thank you!

Best regards,
Camilla and Linus (from Denmark)

“In Their Own Words” is a series within the Autism Speaks blog which shares the voices of people who have autism, as well as their loved ones. If you have a story you wish to share about your personal experience with autism, please send it to editors@autismspeaks.org. Autism Speaks reserves the right to edit contributions for space, style and content. Because of the volume of submissions, not all can be published on the site.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,050 other followers

%d bloggers like this: