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Posts Tagged ‘participate in research’

Why Autism Became My Career … A Love Story

February 14, 2012 7 comments

 Posted by AGRE Senior Recruitment Research Manager Tiffany Torigoe

In 2003, I moved to California from my native Hawaii. I’d just graduated from college, and I immediately accepted a job with Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) with one goal in mind: Start building my career in research!

I didn’t know that this job would become so much more.

Autism quickly became my passion. As I learned more about the complexities of autism, I knew I wanted to make a difference in the lives of affected families. My interactions with AGRE parents and grandparents have been amazing. They have remarkable stories about their children and how each is wonderfully unique.

At the same time, I find it a great challenge to address some of their greatest concerns. I understand their urgent need for answers. But as someone trained in science, I also know that real answers sometimes take years to deliver. I remind our parents to never give up hope.

One of my most memorable interactions occurred at a Defeat Autism Now (DAN) conference several years ago. Autism Speaks had just started to become a prominent player within the autism community, and there was still apprehension about us. Unfortunately, I was not well equipped to answer some of the challenging political questions people asked me that day! I felt like a moving target and was left confused because I had thought we were all working towards the same goal: helping people with autism!

Just as I was packing up for the day, a man came over to the Autism Speaks table to talk with me. “I’ve been meaning to come over here all day,” he said. “I just want to thank you for being here. It means so much to us that you’re here to support us. Thank you.” To this day, whenever I feel lost in the politics and paperwork, I remember that moment and am reminded by why I’m here at AGRE.

Ultimately, I think the future of autism research lies in collaboration with scientists and families around the world. So it is very exciting to see AGRE’s mission begin to expand outside of North America. We know that autism is a global issue, and I think diversity is the glue that autism research needs to put all the pieces together.

In closing I want to thank all our supporters – those who Walk, those who participate in research, and everyone who cares about our mission to improve the lives of all who struggle with autism. Thank you so much. I love being part of this community.

Follow the hyperlinks to learn more about AGRE and current opportunities for participating in autism research. You can also explore the studies we’re funding using our grant search.

Our Science Data-Meister Reflects on the Big Picture

December 12, 2011 Leave a comment

Posted by Dusan Bosnjakovic, director of research information systems for Autism Speaks Autism Genetic Resource Exchange

On a day to day basis, I can get so immersed in the mechanics, data and details of what I do that I sometimes forget to step back and see the bigger picture: The tremendous value of the research information systems that Autism Speaks has created within its Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE).

I am feeling particularly sensitive to this “big picture” with this week’s announcement of the historic addition of AGRE information to the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR), which is supported and maintained by the National Institutes of Health.

I’m reminded that the goal of all my work is to increase the availability and usefulness of the vital information that we collect—information that can advance the scientific understanding of autism and speed the development of better treatments.

I promise to spare you the technical details. Suffice it to say, our role is to take the anonymous information (de-identified data) we gather from our participating families and put it in an easy-to-use format that autism researchers can use to increase the power and accuracy of their scientific findings and insights.

In joining our data with NDAR’s, we are making more comprehensive data available to the broader scientific community and also linking data collected on participants within AGRE with additional data on the same participants across a variety of other research studies (all anonymous). This is adding significantly to the autism field’s body of scientific knowledge. And this is our obligation to our families: To maximize their contributions and make sure their de-identified data will always be available to qualified scientists who are working to improve the lives of those who struggle with autism.  We take pride in providing researchers with the most comprehensive and highest quality of data possible, so that they can do what they do best: science.

Special thanks go to Reinis Berzins, our AGRE data projects coordinator, whose position was made possible by the $1 million National Institutes of Health grant we received to integrate the AGRE and NDAR databases. To learn more about AGRE, please visit its website. To learn more about the AGRE-NDAR federation, please see this week’s related news item.

Read more science news and perspective on the Science Page.

Autism Speaks ATN Registry Enrolls 4,000th Family

October 25, 2011 16 comments


 Posted by Clara Lajonchere, PhD, vice president of clinical programs, Autism Speaks

 

Four years ago, the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network (ATN) set out to collect information on the medical concerns of children and adolescents with autism across North America—while delivering the best in evidence-based, comprehensive healthcare and support for these patients and their families.

Through the efforts of hundreds of clinicians across what are now 17 sites, the ATN Registry has now surpassed 4,000 enrolled children. The information gathered from these participating families is providing the global healthcare community with priceless information on the medical conditions often associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and the best ways to manage them. In particular, such large numbers allow researchers and physicians to better understand and address the great diversity of medical, behavioral, and other quality of life issues associated with autism.

Enrolling our 4,000th family is an important milestone for Autism Speaks, as we continue to expand and support the ATN and its mission of providing the highest quality of comprehensive care by teams of medical professionals who understand ASDs and excel at conducting evidence-based research.

In 2008 and again this year, the ATN earned additional federal funding to operate as the Autism Intervention Research Network on Physical Health (AIR-P)—funding made possible thanks to the passage and recent renewal of the Combating Autism Act. Under the grant, awarded to the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, the ATN/AIR-P Network continues to develop and conduct research aimed at directly improving the health and well being of children and adolescents with ASDs and other developmental disabilities. Funding is supporting research in areas of highest priority to families and that can have the greatest benefit for children.

As we celebrate the benchmark of the 4,000th enrolled child, we want to again express our deep gratitude for both the commitment of our participant families and the thousands of donors, volunteers, and staff members whose support make this work possible. Thank you for helping us improve the care and respect afforded to all individuals on the autism spectrum.

Fostering the Conversation: You and our Scientists

July 19, 2011 8 comments

Posted by Jessica Snyder Sachs, director of science communications for Autism Speaks

This month has been a tremendously exciting time in autism research, as our blog posts make clear. Naively, I’ve been waiting for a pause in the torrent of news to introduce myself. That’s not looking likely, so allow me to shoehorn a quick intro—and a couple questions for you.

Three weeks ago, I stepped into the newly created position of Autism Speaks’ director of science communications. It’s now my privilege to suds and squeegee your window onto the science that donor dollars are funding. I’ll also be enlisting our science staff to answer your questions and generally provide perspective on some of the splashy—and sometimes confusing—headlines in the national news.

By background, I’m a science journalist and medical writer. For the last 20 years, I’ve been a regular contributor to national magazines such as Discover, Popular Science, Parents, Parenting, and Prevention. I’ve also written a few science books for the general reader, the most recent being Good Germs, Bad Germs.

The science staff at Autism Speaks has always been passionate about communicating with families affected by autism and with everyone who cares about enhancing the lives of the remarkable individuals on the spectrum. I’m here to facilitate their conversation with you—in both directions.

Perhaps you’re a volunteer and want resources that can help you explain the nature and importance of the research we fund. Perhaps you have a child affected by autism and would consider participating in research.  Perhaps you are a parent who is looking forward to answers and new treatment approaches that will help your child.  Or perhaps you are a high-functioning teenager, college student, or other adult on the spectrum and want to know more about studies that relate to you (the link goes to just one example).

In whatever way you’re comfortable, we want to involve you in our scientific mission: To improve the lives of all who struggle with autism. To that end, I’d love your input on some of the new avenues of communication we’re considering. Would you please take a moment to answer our two-question survey? Please feel free to provide additional feedback in the comments section. Thanks!

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