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Posts Tagged ‘PTCHD1’

New CNVs on Chromosome X

September 16, 2010 15 comments

Guest blog by Dr. John Vincent, who is a Scientist and Head of the Molecular Neuropsychiatry and Development Laboratory of the Psychiatric Neurogenetics Section in the Neuroscience Research Department and an Associate Scientist of The Centre for Applied Genomics at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.

The group here in the Molecular Neuropsychiatry & Development Lab at CAMH, along with our collaborative partners at Sick Kids and elsewhere report the identification of PTCHD1 as a gene for autism spectrum disorder, as well as intellectual disability, on the X-chromosome. The finding stems from attempts to find differences in specific strands of DNA, called copy number variants (CNVs) in the DNA of autistic individuals that might be linked to the condition. If the human genome can be thought of as a book containing the DNA code written out in words and sentences, we each of us have our own unique book, with many words spelled differently from each other, but mostly without changing the overall meaning of the words and sentences. Traditional genetic studies would try to identify spelling mistakes that compromise the meaning of a sentence, and thus lead to an incorrect message, i.e. resulting in a clinical condition. In our current study we have been looking instead for whole sentences, paragraphs or pages that are either deleted or duplicated (i.e. CNVs), thus altering the meaning of the message, and leading in this case to autism.

We were particularly interested, in our study, to look at CNVs on one of the 2 sex chromosomes, the X, as it might explain some of the bias towards boys having autism over girls. In our initial screen of over 400 autism patients, we identified a large deletion disrupting the PTCHD1 gene. In an analysis of CNVs in genomes from over 1000 more autism individuals, deletions just next to this gene were the most significant finding. These deletions are likely to disrupt DNA sequences that may regulate how the PTCHD1 gene is expressed. In addition, we identified many single letter changes in the PTCHD1 gene that may affect the “meaning”. These changes were not found in the DNA of many control individuals.

The PTCHD1 gene makes a protein with as yet unknown function, however it shows similarities to several known proteins that function as cell-surface receptors for an inter-cellular signaling pathway known as Hedgehog, crucial in determining how brain cells develop and mature. The preliminary data we present in the paper shows that PTCHD1 appears to have similar properties to the two Hedgehog receptors already known, leading us to speculate on a role for Hedgehog-related processes in autism.
These findings give us another important gene that we can screen for in at risk children, and will allow earlier therapeutic interventions, thus increasing the likelihood of success.

For more information, please see the press release.

Categories: Science Tags: , , ,
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