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Posts Tagged ‘School Community Tool Kit’

Family Services Office Hours – 10.05.11

October 7, 2011 3 comments

Office Hours easily connects families to a wide variety of autism-related resources, including Family Services Tool Kits, and the Autism Speaks Resource Guide, an online national database of autism providers and resources searchable by state and zip code.

Family Services Office Hours is designed to quickly provide access to resources that are available and free to the entire autism community.

The Office Hours sessions are staffed by ART coordinators who are specially trained to connect families affected by autism to resources.

2:32
Hey Everyone! We will be on in 25 minutes! Hang on!
2:57
Just getting ready to go!
3:02
Welcome to Office Hours! Family Services is taking questions and we are here to help offer resources and guidance!
3:03
Comment From Jennifer

My son is 4 and has PDD-NOS. His teacher says she does not see any reason why he can’t be in a regular Kindergarden next year. Is it possibe that his current diagnosis can improve…and then regress as he gets older?

3:04
Hi Jennifer! Children with autism progress at different times. Make sure that he has an IEP in place and be sure to measure his goals and objectives to make sure that he is infect making progress!
3:05
*in fact
3:06
Comment From Guest

My 18 mo old son has just been diagnosed. I’m having a hard time finding treatment options. The state (WI) funding has a 2 yr waiting list and our pivate insurance is self funded so they don’t have to do much. He is in speech therapy 3 x a week and occupational 1 month. What else can I do? He was rated as moderate on the scale.

3:08
Hi Guest! That is great that he is already in those therapies! Early intervention is key! Early Intervention is Federally mandated. Please check out our Resource Guide for your state to find a facility near you. Here is a link!http://www.autismspeaks.org/resource-guide
3:08
Also, here is our 100 Day Kit for further assistance!http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/100-day-kit
3:09
Comment From Dawn

Have you heard of Irene law and how it effects grade advancement from third grade forward?

3:10
hi Dawn, I haven’t heard of Irene law. Can you tell me about it?
3:11
Comment From Kristen

I posted earlier Gabe is my 18 month old. With the research I have been doing I have read that there is a higher insidence in siblings. I have a 4 year old, no concerns there, but we also have a 2 month old. How early can you really look for signs of autism?

3:12
Hi Kristen! Clinicians are diagnosing autism earlier in earlier. It is always helpful to learn the signs. Here is a linkhttp://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/learn-signs
3:12
Our Video Glossary should also be helpfulhttp://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/video-glossary
3:12
Be sure to work with your clinician to follow the progress of your children and to discuss any further concerns
3:15
Comment From melina

I am in England and my 4 year old son has all signs of classic autism, but i cant get a pediatrician to give a diagnosis. any suggestions?

3:16
Hi Melina. You may want to ask your child’s doctor for a referral to a developmental pediatrician or a neurologist. It is very important that you get the diagnosis sooner rather than later. You are doing the right thing by seeking further clarification about your son’s status!
3:17
Comment From Jessica

My son is 4 years old and was diagnosed with autism at the age of 2. He has a HUGE problem with eating his poop and playing in it! I am desperatly asking anyone to help me help him! Thank you

3:18
Hi Jessica. I’m sorry to hear that you are having this difficulty. This is important information for your son’s treatment team to know. You can start by talking to your pediatrician or your son’s IEP team. You should not feel alone with this problem, there are plenty of other parents who have experienced this! Talking to professionals is a key first step to understanding what is causing this to happen.
3:20
Comment From melina

i tried that and the gp who only met my son once for 5 minuets said he couldn’t be autistic because he sat on a chair

3:20
Hi Melina. It is very important that you find a gp or pediatrician who will listen to your concerns and help meet your needs. Do not give up, you are doing the right thing!
3:21
Hi Janine, it important to work closely with your daughter’s clinician and get the support you need to in order to access services.
3:23
Hi Guest and Adrienna! We have a very extensive resource guide that you can use to help find therapists in your area. Simply go towww.autismspeaks.org/resource-guide, click on your state and search among our many categories. Enter your zip code and expand the radius so you can find all possible options in your state.
3:23
Comment From Adrienna

My 3 yr old has been diagnosed with autism and I was wondering if you knew of any sites where I could find behavioral specialists or obtain behavioral intervention in the state of KY?

3:23
Comment From Guest

My son will be 4 next month and is currently recieving Speech and OT therapies but they are now recommending ABA therapy which I am told is very costly, are there any resources in opr around Charlotte,NC that I may check out for this or something else that may assist him?

3:23
Hi Guest and Adrienna! We have a very extensive resource guide that you can use to help find therapists in your area. Simply go towww.autismspeaks.org/resource-guide, click on your state and search among our many categories. Enter your zip code and expand the radius so you can find all possible options in your state.
3:24
You can also find local autism organizations in the resource guide in your state that may have more information for you.
3:25
Comment From Linda

school issues…. getting a one on one aid when starting to help the transition. school wants him in school for a couple weeks before an iep can be set up to see if he needs one. we are afraid to start him without one, afraid of maybe making it very hard as he has not had to do any real transitioning and we feel if he has help for a little while that he may not have to continue to have an aid for a long period. he is high functioning and just needs someone to help him get a start. he is 7 and already a yr behind because of our issues with school.

3:26
Hi Linda! You have the right to call an IEP meeting at any point. You have to be sure to advocate for yourself and child. We have several resources that may be helpful to you. First off, our IEP Guidehttp://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/gp_iep_guide.pdf
3:27
We also have the School Community Toolkit to assist members of the school community in understanding and supporting students with autism. Here is a linkhttp://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/school-community-tool-kit
3:28
Comment From donna

my 3 year old son is in the process of being diagnosed and i am having trouble getting his therapy back since he turned 3. he was reciving early intervention and speech therapy but they told me they had to stop because of his age.

3:28
You can also search our Resource Guide for Advocacy in your area http://www.autismspeaks.org/resource-guide
3:28
hi Donna, I am curious. Were there transitional services put in place?
3:30
You early Intervention treatment team should be able to help you make a transition to school based services.
3:32
Donna, you may also want to look up state information in our Resource Guide. Click the categories “State Information – Early Intervention” and “State Information – Preschool” to learn more.http://www.autismspeaks.org/community/fsdb/search.php
3:32
You should also check out our “Your Child’s Rights page”http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/your-childs-rights
3:32
Comment From Courtney

Is there anything comparable to ABA therapy? What can I do to assist him in behavior modifications?

3:32
Hi Courtney! We have a list of various treatment options on our website on the What is Autism page.http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/treatment You can see a list on the left side of the page and read more about each.
3:33
Comment From Andrea

Donna my daughter was two when she was diagnosed and there was a lapse in service when she turned 3 because its defferent providers, but as long as he’s been evaluated by the school district then you’re on the right path.

3:34
Comment From Jessica

anyone know of good neorological doctors in the Indiana area?

3:35
Hi Jessica. Check out our Resource Guide and you can search for lots of resources in Indiana! www.autismspeaks.org/resource-guide
3:35
Comment From Nichelle

My autistic son is 5 and will be 6 next week he is in kindergarten and he has a problem with transitions. He really loved his teachers and friends from pre-k but is really having a hard time in kindergarten so far. His teachers send me notes basically everyday about his not paying attention or disturbing the class or throwing a mouse across the class because he didn’t want to get off the computer. Lately he has been saying shut up at home and school and when he does not get his way he says stupid mom, dad or the teacher. I don’t know what to do. Please help.

3:36
Hi Nichelle! You are right to have these concerns. You are doing the right thing to address these problems early. You should call an IEP meeting with your entire team to address these behaviors. You should not feel alone in addressing problems that he is having at school or at home.
3:37
Check out our IEP guide to learn more about how to work effectively with your IEP team.http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/your-childs-rights
3:37
Your son is reacting and there is a reason for that. Part of the IEP team’s responsibility is to better understand the reason and what the function of those behaviors are for your son.
3:38
Comment From Charteisha

My son is 14 years old and had autism. He has been aggressive at school…hitting students and the teacher. This is his first year at this new school..high school. I am already becoming concern because the school called me yesterday to pick him up because he was aggressive. I don’t want him to be kicked out of school. I plan to increase his medication…Risperdal to hopefully get better control of his behavior. Any other suggestions?

3:38
Hi Charteisha! We are sorry to hear you are having difficulties with your son. This is something your IEP team and a psychiatrist should address to understand the underlying causes.
3:39
We have a great transition tool kit for parents just like you of individuals with autism ages 14-22. It is a guide to help walk you through this often difficult time. We can send it to you for free! Just fill out the form at the link below:http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/transition-tool-kit
3:40
I know this may take some tiime but it is so important to have good communication with his teachers and the others who are helping him at school.
3:41
Comment From Amy

I made a comment on how to get a person out of a local trainging center. This person is 40 years of age, counts, knows his color, ABC’s, feeds himself, dresses himself and talks with people. He has Autism and that’s the only reason he is at this trainging center. I would like for him to come live in my home and have a more normal life. Can you help me????

3:42
Hi Amy. Our resource guide has lists of attorneys and advocates that will be able to help you advocate for your friend/family member. Click on your state and then attorneys or advocates and type your zip code. Be sure to expand your search!www.autismspeaks.org/resource-guide
3:43
Hi Adrienna, There is a list of agencies in our resource library.
3:43
Comment From Adrienna

I have tried to look for any financial assistance through on your resource page and everytime I type in my area code and various distances I get nothing. Is there another site I can go to for finding financial assistance?

3:44
You may also want to contact local autism organizations listed in the Resource Guide who may know of other funding sources in your area.
3:44
Comment From Gillian

My son is 2 1/2 and was diagnosed with autism/pdd-nos at the age of 18 months. My husband does a lot of online research and lately all of this information keeps popping up about a link between autism and lyme disease and I wanted to get other mother’s opinions and/or personal experiences with this line of thinking

3:45
Hi Gillian. We are not aware of any relationship between Lyme disease and autism. If you have concerns, you should ask your pediatrician about it. You can also emailresearch@autismspeaks.org to get answers from our science team.
3:46
It is important for all of you to remember that while the internet has lots of perks and is a great source for information, please be careful with what you read, especially about autism. There are a lot of different theories out there, many from untrusted sources!
3:46
Comment From donna

is there any where i can get help to help my family to be able to communicate with my son better?

3:47
Hi Donna! We are in the midst of creating family support tool kits. We had a grandparent guide come out two weeks agohttp://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/community-connections/celebrating-grandparents
3:47
And now we are working on kits for parents, siblings and friends. They should be out in the next two weeks!
3:48
We also have lots of books in our Resource Library for siblings, parents, and other family members. You can check out our books list at http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/resource-library/books
3:51
Comment From Erin

Where does a single parent of a 4yr.old pdd-nos w/3 other children get help for care?No family or friends to help and I work full-time.

3:52
Hi Erin. I am sorry to hear you are having difficulty finding care for your children. We did a Community Connections a few months back that provides lots of information and tips about finding effective respite care. http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/community-connections/respite-care-and-autism
3:54
Comment From Guest

My son is 6 and just got a PDD-NOS diagnosis this past summer…Before that he had a ADHD diagnosis which the school did not buy….But NOW they don’t seem to buy the PDD-NOS either?! What can I do to make sure we are all looking at him through the same lense for his next IEP meeting

3:55
Hi Guest. It is important that everyone who works with your son understands his strengths and limitations. This may be done by doing assessments of his different skill sets. The IEP must include lots of assessment data and information about your child’s status.
3:56
The areas of difficulty and strength are much more important than the actual diagnosis since every child on the autism spectrum is so different!
3:57
So it is important to make sure the IEP team and other professionals involved understand all they can about your son. You can read our IEP guide here:http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/community-connections/respite-care-and-autism
3:57
Comment From Erin

Is there a possible link between Ulcerative Colitis and Autism?I was diagnosed with UC after the birth of my daughter

3:58
hi Erin- Please email research@autismspeaks.org with your question. They will have articles or recent studies to answer your question.
3:58
Thank you everyone for joining today! Be sure to check out our newest project- a Health and Wellness site that includes lots of tips and resources regarding fitness, sleep and nutrition so your family member can be as healthy as possible!http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/health-and-wellness
3:59
We look forward to hearing from you all again next Wednesday at Office Hours! And as always, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact our Autism Response Team at 888-AUTISM2 or familyservices@autismspeaks.org

Mainstreaming Max

September 21, 2011 10 comments

The last episode, of NBC‘s of Parenthood, follows Max as a mainstream student on his first day at his new school. Here is a recap!

You can watch the full episode of ‘Hey, If You’re Not Using That Baby’ here.

———

Kristina and Adam make the difficult decision for Max to attend a different school as a mainstream student. They both try to prep Max on how best to make friends – look people in the eye and smile and shake hands.

Max’s teacher Miss Mikindoe is giving an assignment when Max loudly calls out his neighbor for writing in her book. When Max won’t let it go, Miss Mikindoe points out that talking out in class is also against the rules. The lesson continues, and Max continues to offend, talking out of turn and correcting other students. And why does he have to raise his hand? Max finally settles down, but sadly, the damage is done, as his classmates begin to make him feel like an outcast.

Max is trying to make friends by looking kids in the eye, introducing himself and extending his hand to shake. Unable to understand why this technique isn’t working for him, a frustrated Max sits down to eat lunch by himself.

Kristina stops by Miss Mikindoe’s classroom and literally begs for a few minutes of her time after not getting a response over email. Within seconds, Kristina’s in tears, describing her worry and the spying incident. Miss Mikindoe reassures her that everything’s going to be okay – but Kristina is going to have to get comfortable with having a little less control.

Kristina visits Max’s teacher for reassurance on the decision to mainstream Max. Click here to view the clip.

Many parents struggle with the decision to mainstream their child. What has your experience been? Can you relate to this?

Have you or your child had difficulty making friends? How do you cope? 

Simon Wallace answers, “My child has joined a ‘mainstream’ classroom but is struggling. What can help?” Click here for his response.

————-

Valuable Resources
In this week’s ‘Experts Speak,’ Roy Q. Sanders, M.D. expresses, “I want teachers and other school personnel to know that parents know their children better than anyone else. The parents are the experts on their child. And I want parents to remember that – even though you may feel intimidated – as parents you have the most knowledge about your child. You are really running the show. You are the expert. Don’t ever allow anyone to take that power away from you.” Visit here for more.

School Community Tool Kit: A tool kit to assist members of the school community in understanding and supporting students with autism.

Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism Tool Kit

Individualized Education Program (IEP): Guide

My child has joined a ‘mainstream’ classroom but is struggling. What can help?

August 26, 2011 15 comments


Today’s “Got Questions?” response again comes from Simon Wallace, PhD, Autism Speaks director of scientific development for Europe

The U.S. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires schools to include children with disabilities in the least restrictive classroom settings that are possible. At the same time, studies show that different levels of so-called “mainstreaming” present different benefits and challenges.1 And parental preference often varies.2 So the first question to ask yourself is “what type of school placement is the best for my child?”

For instance, you have the option of full inclusion, with all classes taught in a mainstream environment, or partial mainstream, with some proportion of classes taught in a more supportive setting. I also encourage parents to keep in mind the potential advantages of a specialist autism school. Making these decisions should always involve a consultation between parents, teachers and the pupil with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Beyond teaching support, we know that bullying and social exclusion affects the mainstream-school experience of many children with ASD. A recent survey estimated that 44% of children with ASD have been bullied.3 Bullying, in turn, can lead to an increased social isolation and mental health difficulties. Another study suggested that the support of classmates is very important to making the mainstream experience a success for the student with autism.4

One method for encouraging peer relationships is a technique called Circle of Friends, where the child with ASD is at the center of a peer group. This group periodically works on specific goals. Another method, which avoids such a strong focus on the child, is to work on social skills in private or with a group of other children with ASD.

Of course, teacher training remains pivotal to supporting the success of children with ASD in a mainstream classroom. Federal law requires that teachers make reasonable adjustments to their teaching strategies and classroom environment to accommodate the needs of pupils with disabilities. In particular, teachers should be encouraged to adjust the content and delivery of the curriculum, to consider the sensory needs of the pupil, and to welcome the input of both parents and special-needs students when planning their educational programs.

Here are some useful resources, along with references to the studies I mentioned:

Resources:

1. The Autism Speaks School Community Tool Kit
2. The Asperger Syndrome/HFA and the Classroom chapter of the Autism Speaks Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism Tool Kit
3. Bullying and ASD: A Guide for School Staff (UK)
4. IEPs, iPads and Bullies: 10 Tips from a Dad Who’s Been There, a recent Family Services blog from dad James Vaughan

References:
1. Full inclusion and students with autism. Mesibov GB, Shea V. J Autism Dev Disord. 1996 Jun;26(3):337-46.
2. Parental perspectives on inclusion: effects of autism and Down syndrome. Kasari C, Freeman SF, Bauminger N, Alkin MC. J Autism Dev Disord. 1999 Aug;29(4):297-305.
3. Bullying among children with autism and the influence of comorbidity with ADHD: a population-based study. Montes G, Halterman JS. Ambul Pediatr. 2007 May-Jun;7(3):253-7.
4. Inclusion as social practice: views of children with autism.  Ochs E, Kremer T, Solomon O, Sirota K. Social Development. 2001;10(3):399–419.

Got more questions? Please email us at gotquestions@autismspeaks.org. Thanks.


Family Services Office Hours – 8/24/11

August 25, 2011 5 comments

The Family Services Department at Autism Speaks will now offer online Office Hours each Wednesday, starting August 3, 2011, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. EDT

Office Hours, a new resource available on the web at www.autismspeaks.org will easily connect families to a wide variety of autism-related resources, including Family Services’ Toolkits, and the Autism Speaks Resource Guide, an online national database of autism providers and resources searchable by state and zip code. Family Services’ Office Hours is designed to quickly provide access to resources that are available and free to the entire autism community.

“Having a family member with autism can easily lead to feeling isolated without knowing where to turn. In addition, most families have little free time to search for reliable information about autism, yet they may be in need of timely information. Office Hours offers a quick connection to the Autism Response Team(ART) who can assist you in getting the information you need as quickly as possible,” states Marianne Sullivan, Assistant Director of National Outreach and Resources.

The Office Hours resource is staffed by ART coordinators who are specially trained to connect families affected by autism to resources.

In addition to Office Hours, ART is available by telephone during usual business hours at 888-AUTISM 2 (888-288-4762). You can also reach ART by email at familyservices@autismspeaks.org.

Here is the transcript:

12:58
Hello Everyone!
12:58
Comment From Melissa 

Excited for our chat today! Thank you~

12:58
We are so excited to be on this chat today. As we wrap up summer we can look back over the month of August as we discussed back to school!
1:00
Today we are going to go over some last minute strategies to transition to the new school year. We would like to introduce to you our new ‘Individualized Education Program (IEP): Summary, Process and Practical Tips’
1:00
It is a free, new online guide that provides parents with important and reliable information and advice about navigating the IEP process, created by a team of pro bono lawyers at Goodwin Procter.
1:01
You can download it for FREE here!http://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/iep_guide.pdf
1:01
Another very variable resource we have comes from a LIVE Chat Gary Mayerson hosted, ‘How To Compromise With Your School District Without Compromising Your Child’
1:02
You can read the full transcript here!http://blog.autismspeaks.org/2011/08/18/transcript-gary-mayerson/
1:02
Comment From Deb 

Did anyone else send their child to school for the first time this year?

1:02
Hi Deb! Can you tell us a little bit about your child’s transition?
1:03
Comment From Deb 

He’s 4, and started pre-k this week.

1:03
How did things go?
1:03
Comment From Deb 

He’s doing well, but his anxiety is through the roof. Overall I’m pleased with his reaction

1:04
This is where transition planning comes in. It is great to prepare him by having routines or going over his day before he goes to school to alleviate some of his anxiety
1:06
Comment From Deb 

We did that, we’ve been getting ready for a couple of months. I just can’t seem to quite reach him to … smooth his feathers.

1:07
Keep trying and don’t give up! Communicate with his teacher- they may have some great ideas and teamwork is key!
1:07
Comment From Jenny 

Any good ways to handel anxiey over homework assignments? My son is in 8th grade and homework is so stressful to him.

1:07
Hi Jenny that is a very common concern.
1:09
Start with communicating with your son’s teacher about what the homework expectation is. I suggest you setup a special time each day to complete his assignments and work with the teacher to create a rewards system that will help him work through and complete his assignments. Remember, just like all other kids, your child is not any different… LOTS of children have trouble completing homework assignments. Ask family members and his teachers for some ideas how to best work through this issue
1:10
Paula Kluth has some wonderful resources that may help as well! Here is her page of ‘Readings’http://www.paulakluth.com/readings/
1:10
Comment From Arden 

We made my grandson, age 4, a book with pictures of his teachers and a story about the schedule of the day. He is in his 2nd year of pre-school throught the Special School District, and he likes going to school.

1:10
Arden that is wonderful! Great planning!
1:11
Kids with autism respond so well to predictability. We are always so glad to see a grandparent involved- keep up the good work!
1:12

The School Community Tool Kit provides information and resources for general education and administrative school staff to support a positive school experience for children with autism.
1:12
The School Community Tool Kit has some great tips and suggestions on classroom management for kids with ASD. Check out the ‘Appendix’ section!http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/tool-kits/school-community-tool-kit
1:13
Each section is broken up and you can download each section independently – for FREE!
1:14
Comment From Jenny 

does this explain the special education rights of the parents as well as those of the child?

1:15
Hi Jenny – the IEP Guide explains this, which can be downloaded here http://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/iep_guide.pdf
1:15
You can also learn more about your child’s rights here!http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/your-childs-rights
1:16
Comment From Jenny 

ok great because I always feel like the schools are not telling everything

1:16
One of the most important things as your role as a parent is to be an advocate. We have provided these resources so you can do your best in parent advocacy
1:17
Comment From Brenda 

My 7 year old son has Asperger’s. He’s entering 2nd grade. Although making progress in leaps and bounds with a great IEP and teachers and professionals, he is still very immature emotionally and tantrums in front of his friends. How can we help education not only his teachers, but his classmates on his condition. He still doesn’t understand himself.

1:18
Hi Brenda- It would be really helpful to look at the School Community Tool Kit in the Appendix section. There are a lot of great resources on how to talk to peers as well as teachers about ASD
1:19
You may also want to look at the Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism Tool Kit. It goes more into the details of the diagnosis!
1:20
Comment From Jenny 

My son had a teacher that played a video about Autism designed for children for her class. it really helped the other kids with how they treat him in a positive way.

1:20
Nice going Jenny and kudos to the teacher who is thinking about the needs of ALL of her students!
1:21
Comment From Jenny 

it was her idea, she was a great teacher

1:23
We have heard some great feedback on the book – ‘Wrightslaw: All About IEPS’
1:23
You can also visit the website which is a wonderful resource for ALL parent advocates
1:24
Comment From Alexis 

My son is going to school for the first time and I’m worried because he doesnt speak yet

1:24
Hi Alexis – thanks so much for this question. How does your son communicate?
1:25
I am assuming that your child’s IEP has communication goals and objectives in it that outline the way in which your child communicates to teachers and peers. It is very important that it is well defined across all of his environments
1:25
In this case it would be important to have a speech therapist involved in your child’s IEP planning
1:26
Many parents have reported great success in using iPad technology as a way of communicating
1:27
The ‘Technology and Autism’ Community Connections is also a great resource http://www.autismspeaks.org/family-services/community-connections/technology-and-autism
1:28
*Many parents have reported great success in using iPad technology as a way of having their child communicate* To be more clear!
1:28
Comment From April Shumard 

Hello! My name is April. I just wanted to ask right quick, I know the IEP is done yearly, but is is done on the yearly annaversary of the last one or is there a specific month. I am forgetful!

1:29
Hi April! I know it can be hard to balance everything! So the IEP is done annually in the same month
1:29
Comment From Sandy 

My son is 9 & going into 4th grade. I’m concerned about his ability to focus on non-preferred tasks in class (i.e. math). We worked on his summer workbook yesterday & it took him at least 45 minutes to complete 10 problems . . . and that is with me right there with him to keep him on task. He can do the work, but is so distracted it takes forever.

1:30
Hi Sandy – I think it would be great to get some support from a behavior analyst who can work to create a behavior plan that will help your son complete his task in a timely manner.
1:31
I would recommend asking your son’s teaching to ask for a functional behavior assessment
1:31
During last week’s chat with Gary MAyerson, he defined what a Functional Behavior Assessment is.
An FBA identifies the target behaviors, tracks and measures the frequency, duration and antecedents of those behaviors, and then, finally, hypothesizes as to the likely function of the target behaviors…and you need to know what the function is before you can develop and design a proper behavior intervention plan
1:33
Comment From Sandy 

Thank you – I will pull up last week’s chat and check in with the people in charge of the IEP.

1:34
Your welcome! We have dedicated the month of August to back to school and we have lots of resources in our Family Services Section so PLEASE be sure to visit!
1:35
Comment From doreen 

my son got dxsd autism and autustic spectrum disorder does he qualify for social security benefits ??

1:35
Hi Doreen – It all depends on your state, but check with your State Developmental Disability Office. Social Security is a little tricky in that it depends on a family’s income, but your son may be entitled based on his disability
1:37
Comment From Arden 

I will be attending the IEP meeting next week. Any streategies that will help me get through the process?

1:37
First of all Arden, good luck!
1:37
It is great that you are thinking about what you can do to make the process more smoothly
1:37
If you look back at earlier posts in this Q & A there are great resources that you can review
1:38
We have a new Individualized Education Program (IEP): Summary, Process and Practical Tips, a free, new online guide that provides parents with important and reliable information and advice about navigating the IEP process, created by a team of pro bono lawyers at Goodwin Procter.
1:38
One thing to remember is to be positive and promote collaboration with your IEP team!
1:39
A positive attitude will go a long way in helping to get services for your child
1:40
Comment From Alexis 

Quick Question Is a child with a developmental disability such as autism entitled to a blue handicapped placard from the DMV

1:42
That is a good question Alexis! I think that depends on that state you are in and the eligibility requirements are listed on your state DMV page
1:42
Comment From Guest 

How do you get the school to participate in the use of the school tool kit?

1:44
Great question! We have had many parents who send the PDF to the Resource Specialist at their child’s school. BEWARE it is 250 pages and it can be expensive to print. Many schools may want to print one copy to keep in a binder to have to use for all of their students with autism
1:45
There is a section for staff training included in the kit
1:45
Great work promoting the Kit to your school! Great advocacy!
1:45
Comment From April Shumard 

Do I have to wait for the yearly IEP? Can I request sooner??

1:45
Absolutely!
1:46
Under IDEA anyone on the IEP can request an IEP
1:46
It is important to put that request in writing to make sure it is well documented and that the person who is responsible receives the document
1:47
If your school is not in compliance with your current IEP it is important that you go ahead and make a request for an IEP meeting
1:48
Comment From Bonnie 

My son was taken out of a regular school in grade 2 he should now be grade 5 level. They have had him in an environment where he is with children who have been banned from all schools here. He has been out of school now for near 2 months with me fighting tooth and nail to try to get him integrated into a regular school with no relief. I have tried through politicians, the autism network in my state education department complaints etc. Any suggestions ?

1:49
Hi Bonnie – you have obviously tried through many different avenues to advocate for your child. You may want to seek an attorney. If you visit the Resource Guide under your state, you can find a list of attorneys in your state.
1:50
It sounds like you have been through a lot and I wish you and your son the best
1:50
Some parents have to move mountains to get the right fit for your child.
1:51
You are doing a wonderful job of being a parent advocate
1:51
Comment From Teresa 

My grandson’s school told my daughter that even though she had an IEP from the end of this past school year that they would still have to evaluate him for 90 days to decide if they are going to impliment the recommendations from his last IEP. Why is it they just don’t go ahead and impliment that IEP while he is being evaluated?

1:52
Hi Teresa – you are absolutely right to question this!
1:52
Assessments should have been completed in the last IEP. I would recommend a new IEP meeting to discuss this issue
1:52
If something has changed or the school is questioning that needs to be discussed in an IEP meeting
1:53
Comment From Teresa 

how do we go about getting them to do this?

1:53
Requesting the IEP meeting through the Resource Specialist at your grandchild’s school is the way to go. Everyone team member has the right to do that
1:54
Comment From Teresa 

Am I able to attend this IEP meeting. My daughter knows nothing about autism.

1:54
ABSOLUTELY!
1:55
Parents have a right to bring support or another family member to an IEP meeting
1:56
Comment From Teresa 

we have been told by the school that I am not able to attend. I actually have three grandsons with autism two that are in school. THANK YOU SO MUCH. Won’t be shut out again. this is sure nice to know.

1:56
We would like to thank you all for visiting Office Hours this week. It is so great to see the autism community so involved and advocating for our kids with autism.
1:57
Please be sure to check out our new Individualized Education Program (IEP)http://www.autismspeaks.org/sites/default/files/iep_guide.pdf
1:57
We are going to be skipping next week, but will be back on September 7 from 3-4pm EDT
1:58
We will be shifting our discussion to celebrate grandparents and their connection to their grandchildren with autism.
1:58
Please know that you can always contact the Autism Response Team (ART) members are specially trained to connect families with information, resources and opportunities.Call us at 888-AUTISM 2 (288-4762) or email us atfamilyservices@autismspeaks.org.
1:59
Comment From Arden 

Thanks for all the info and links

1:59
Comment From Guest 

Thanks to you we have a better acknowledge about Autism !!

1:59
Comment From Jim 

thank-you for having this forum available to us

1:59
WE WISH YOU THE BEST OF LUCK! See you after Labor Day!

Back to School: What is your child eating for lunch?

August 22, 2011 20 comments

It can be a challenge for parents to make sure your child with autism is getting the right nutrition and diet while at school. How do parents make sure their child’s is continuing the eating habits and they get the nutrition they need?

Are you looking for more tips? Check out our Community Connections!

You can also check out our LIVE Chat with Gary Mayerson and our Family Services ‘Back to School‘ themed Office Hours!

Family Services offers a School Community Tool Kit that assists members of the school community in understanding and supporting students with autism. You can download it for free!


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