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Posts Tagged ‘Spectrummy Mummy’

Weekly Whirl – Our Favorite Holiday Blogs!

December 23, 2011 2 comments

If anyone knows how hectic life can get – WE DO! That’s why we have created the Autism Speaks Weekly Whirl to fill you in on all of the highlights of the week! The last thing we want is for you to be left out of the loop! Please share with friends and family to spread the word about all of the exciting things going on in the autism community. Keep in mind, these updates aren’t limited to Autism Speaks — we will be featuring news from across the community.

This week we are bringing you our favorite holiday blogs from across the web! We would like to wish you a wonderful holiday and a happy and healthy new year! 

Autism Christmas: Different but not less*
“Around the world families will be awoken by small children in the wee hours of the morning begging to see what Santa has left them in their stockings and under the tree. Later they will welcome guests or perhaps travel to see extended family for a special Christmas meal with all the fixings.” -Adventures in Extreme Parenthood

Nate’s Hanukkah list
“Nate isn’t one for surprises. He likes what he likes and that’s that. So when it comes time for his birthday, or Hanukkah, he types up a list of what he wants and we order it. The package gets delivered, he files his new stuff away with little to no fanfare and it’s over almost before it begins.” - Jeff Katz from Autism Support Network

About the Tree
But the past couple years she has decided to ignore the Christmas tree completely. Like… Meh. I am not going to pay any attention to these crazy people putting a treein a  house. Rearranging my living room and oohhing and ahhing and carrying on and putting stuff under it that nobody can play with and stuff on it that’s not even fruit. If I can’t climb it, jump on it, hide under it, spin it, or eat it, it’s of no use to me. Tree, shmree. Whatever people.” -Rhema’s Hope

Christmas 2010
“I’m remembering a day that worked. A day in which every member of the family participated in the celebration of the holiday in his or her own way. A day upon which compromises were struck and expectations were sent out to sea. A day in which any unnecessary demands were dispatched. A day when small prizes were treasured and time was valued above all else. A day that never would have been possible just a few short years ago.”
-Diary of a Mom 

I HAVE A LITTLE DREIDEL (FOR AN SPD HANUKKAH)
“Any holiday can disrupt a family’s routine. One that is eight nights long can really change things up. My son, with all of his sensory issues, can’t sit through an organized Temple Tots celebration or anything like that. So for a successful holiday, we’ll be doing all our celebrating at home, just like I did when I was a kid. And this year, we’ll be making our Hanukkah sensory friendly.” – Alysia from The SPD Blogger Network

Christmas Magic
“Life as a special needs child is tough.  When she role-plays, I’m at once elated that she is developing her pretend play skills, and dismayed that her doll is “going to therapy” day after day. Childhood should be about wonder and magic, not mundane, routine therapy. So at this time of year, I find it even more important to put the wonder back into her life.” – Spectrummy Mummy from Hopeful Parents

A Season of Difference
“Schuyler understands how tribes are formed, I think, at least on some visceral level.  And rather than feeling overwhelmed at how we are spiritually out-of-sync with most of those around us, she is encouraged by our little pod of difference.  In her own way, Schuyler understands the concept of family better than most.” -Robert Hummul-Hudson from Support for Special Needs

Early Hanukkah
“Jacob actually yelled “Happy Hanukkah!” to everyone this year instead of “Merry Christmas!” which he used to be wont to do, as there is so much more of that in the world around him to catch his echolalic attention.”  – The Squashed Bologna

Autism’s Season of Hope
“It dawned on me that this could only mean one thing:  perhaps the experts had it wrong.  Perhaps it was actually his profound attachment to me that made him believe I was all-powerful, responsible for the lights and everything else around him. Perhaps it meant that Nat – though profoundly autistic – was deeply connected to me, after all.”
– Susan Senator with a forward from Lisa Belkin

Wonderful Christmas Time
“Last year, a few of my friends from my support group were talking about getting their kids’ pictures taken with Santa at the mall.  Or rather, not getting them.  The lines, the looks, the sensory overload…it was all too much for their kids.”  – Try Defying Gravity

The Spectrumville Christmas Letter
“It’s that time of year again to share with you our adventures in this journey we call life. 2011 has been another year of magic and wonder…” – Erica from Laughing Through Tears 

In Their Own Words – Flying

October 12, 2010 3 comments

This “In Their Own Words” post is by Jane Parker. She is the wife of a State Department Foreign Service Officer currently living in the DC metro area.  Check out Jane’s blog, Spectrummy Mummy, where she writes about Pudding (3, Asperger’s) and Cubby (18 months, not yet diagnosed).

Two kids, one mummy and a swimming pool. Pudding has always loved the water, but has no fear of it. Cubby is brave enough in a kiddie pool where he can stand up, but terrified in the big pool. Usually he won’t allow any part of his head to touch the water, and makes a sorry sobbing sound if I so much as transfer him to my other hip.

So going to the pool without Spectrummy Daddy in tow is a bold move. This is DC in August. It has been a scorcher, and the humidity factor can be unbearable. When we do brave the playground, the mosquitoes ravish my exotic English suck-me skin, the resulting wounds last for weeks.  Yuck.  Stuck indoors all the time, Pudding can’t help but find trouble.  At times I feel like I say nothing but “no” to her.  I’m weighed down from being so negative.  We’d been inside too long, it was time.

We’d had some problems before in getting her to wear her swim vest, but if she put it on back to front, she was fine. It kind of looked like I’d put my special needs child in a straight jacket, but she was happy, safe, and unable to reach the zipper to take it off.  I’m getting used to odd glances coming our way.  Luckily people tend to keep their small thoughts to themselves, which is just as it should be.

Cubby clung on to me the whole time, but there was no crying or screaming. At a few points, when he was splashing around and soaking his mama (which he says properly now!) quite thoroughly, he squealed with delight. Pudding just looked calm and serene, feeling all the lovely sensation of the water.  The pair of them, who have stretched my heart in ways I could never have imagined, were at peace getting what they needed.  I wanted to cherish the time.  I didn’t feel like the mother taking care of her high-needs children.  I was the special guest at this party.  I felt honoured to be in attendance.

After a while, she took to climbing out and jumping back in again, over and over. There didn’t seem to be much purpose to it, but she had the most beatific smile on her face, it must just feel right to her. So often I’ve taken for granted that my senses and my body work just as they should, I’m so fortunate.  I wish she could have that feeling more often.  I wish everybody could.  I’m just glad she gets to have her moments of it, and I get to share them with her.

One time as she took off, she looked at me and gleefully said, “I’m flying!” My heart soars along with her.  For that one sweltering afternoon, my love, we both were.

“In Their Own Words” is a series within the Autism Speaks blog which shares the voices of people who have autism, as well as their loved ones. If you have a story you wish to share about your personal experience with autism, please send it to editors@autismspeaks.org. Autism Speaks reserves the right to edit contributions for space, style and content. Because of the volume of submissions, not all can be published on the site.

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