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Posts Tagged ‘Treatment’

Promising New Results from Fragile X Drug Trial

At the International Fragile X conference held in Michigan last week, researchers working in partnership with Seaside Therapeutics presented promising results from a Phase II clinical trial with compound STX209. The research was presented by Elizabeth Berry-Kravis, MD, PhD, (Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois) and Randi Hagerman, MD, (M.I.N.D. Institute).

The study followed 63 patients with Fragile X from three groups spanning 6 to 40 years of age. The aim of the study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of STX209 across a broad range of individuals with Fragile X. The research team specifically looked at behavioral and cognitive measures that might indicate benefit from the drug. Indeed, they found statistically significant improvements in sociability in a pediatric group who had scored low on scales of sociability prior to the treatment. This result is particularly important because impairments in social function are a core feature of Fragile X, and also a core feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

In a press release from Seaside Therapeutics, Dr. Hagerman offered a perspective on the results her team has observed.  “A majority of the patients enrolled in the STX209 study are participating in the ongoing open-label extension study and are continuing to benefit from treatment with STX209,” said Dr. Hagerman. “Physicians and parents are reporting increased sociability and communication and decreased outbursts and tantrums. In several cases, patients have been successfully withdrawn from other medications, including mood stabilizers, anti-depressants and, most importantly, anti-psychotics—a significant benefit for patients given the severe side effects associated with this particular class of drug. It is my hope that, with further study, STX209 may be able to play a much needed role in improving the symptoms of fragile X syndrome and help patients and their families achieve an improved quality of life.”

These results are exciting for individuals and the families of those living with Fragile X.  However, perhaps the greater excitement lies in what may come next. Fragile X is the most frequently observed genetic syndrome in individuals with ASD. Synaptic over-excitability has been observed in animal models of autism and is believed to be a common neurobiological underpinning. Seaside Therapeutics is currently exploring the potential for benefit in individuals with ASD through a clinical trial of STX209 in adults, adolescents and children with ASD. We anxiously wait for further data on the use of this compound.

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Tune In – Dr. Geri Dawson on the Radio Show “Radio in Vivo”

July 13, 2010 2 comments

Autism Speaks’ Chief Science Officer, Dr. Geri Dawson, will appear on the radio show “Radio in Vivo” on Wednesday, July 14, 2010 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. EDT/8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. PDT. To listen, go to http://wcomfm.org and click the link to the streaming signal on the home page.

The show will cover a wide range of topics including autism prevalence, genetic and environmental factors, new directions in research and treatment, and Geri’s areas of specific expertise – early detection and early intervention. The purpose of the program is to provide information and education.

We look forward to hearing your thoughts about the program!

UPDATE (7.19.10): The show is now online.  You can access it at http://radioinvivo.net – click on the Schedule/Program Archive link, scroll all the way to the bottom of that page, and you’ll see the link to the podcast, as well as links to Autism Speaks, the AGP, and the PBS webinar.

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How the Autism Treatment Network Helped My Son

May 10, 2010 27 comments

This is a guest post by Judith Ursitti. Judith is Regional Director of State Advocacy Relations at Autism Speaks and has been involved in advocacy since her son Jack’s autism diagnosis almost five years ago.

By now Jack and I had grown accustomed to the routine.

You hear of an excellent doctor. You absolutely must get in to see them. You call to make an appointment. Wait for months and months and months. Finally get there. Sit in the lobby, clipboard on your lap, writing down medical history and group i.d.’s.

Jack screams for a few moments as you wait. People stare. We follow the nurse to the back. Answer questions. Show said doctor that you are a pro at shouldering the reality of it all.

Chin up. Head home.

Empty handed…

Not quite two years ago, Jack and I had another one of what I thought would be one of those appointments. One filled with all the can’ts and doesn’ts..

But this was our first visit to an Autism Treatment Network (ATN) site.

I picked Jack up early from school that day and we made the appointment on time. We sat in the lobby of the LADDERS Clinic with the clipboard. Jack screamed for a few minutes and then bounced up on down on the chair by the window.

And then the nurse led us back.

And we met Dr. Margaret Bauman.

And Dr. B was enamored.. “This guy is different!” she declared.

She drilled me with questions, which I answered rather typically I thought. But Jack’s behavior set the tone. He loved Dr. B. He flirted with Dr. B.

We spent well over hour with Dr. B. She didn’t just focus on his deficits.  True, he was nonverbal.  True, he wasn’t pointing yet.

“His social referencing… it’s beautiful!” she declared.

She prodded him patiently from head to toe.  Took notes.  Contemplated what might be going on with him.  Why he wasn’t talking to us.  Why his autism remained so severe.

And then she gave me a plan.  (I’ve learned since then, that’s what they do at an ATN site.  They don’t just think about the brain. They think about the whole body.)

Dr. B. ordered blood work for the routine genetic testing.  But Dr. B also wanted to make sure Jack wasn’t having G.I. issues, so she referred us to the ATN gastroenterologist.  Allergies can really be an issue for kids with ASD, so she referred us to their allergist.  We discussed sensory issues.  Since he was nonverbal, we talked about different types of augmentative communication devices.  She talked to me about Jack’s occasional sleep issues and we devised a plan to address them.

I must confess that at that very moment, as we worked on Jack’s treatment plan, I allowed it to creep in. That provocative, luxurious sensation called

Hope.

I’ve always felt so connected to Jack. Engaged. Sometimes it’s hard to for others to see, but there is a sparkle there.

Normally when Jack is being evaluated or examined, we only hear words like “challenged” or “severe.”

But Dr. B didn’t use those words. To the contrary, she recognized the sparkle right away.

As I pushed the glass door open and we walked out into the parking lot, a fistful of lab-slips in-hand, I felt a new spring in my step.

Careful, I thought to myself … Remember, the Dr. B really doesn’t have any answers.

I elected to savor the moment.

Jack smiled and jumped into a puddle, giggling as we headed to the car.

Two years later, I’m happy to report that Jack remains a patient at LADDERS.  He started talking to us about six months ago.  His favorite phrase at the moment: “No way…”

The ATN (an initiative of Autism Speaks) is the nation’s first network of hospitals and physicians dedicated to developing a model of comprehensive medical care for children and adolescents with autism. The ATN offers families care from doctors highly experienced in helping individuals with autism and providing treatment for associated conditions such as gastrointestinal and sleep disorders. ATN doctors are dedicated to finding better ways to manage the health of children with autism and sharing their increasing knowledge across the wider medical community. In particular, the ATN is dedicated to developing better ways to identify, manage and treat the physical health conditions of children with autism. And as treatments for these conditions become better defined and recognized, it is the aim of the ATN to see insurers routinely recognize the autism diagnosis and cover physical health treatment.

Speaking with Jason Katims of “Parenthood”

March 24, 2010 27 comments

What Does Genetics Have to Do with Treatment?

March 15, 2010 1 comment

Finding appropriate treatments for autism is a challenge for families and clinicians alike. While behavioral treatments are an effective mainstay of therapeutic approaches, many individuals with autism benefit from the addition of medicinal interventions, particularly for problem behaviors, severe self-injury, and disruptive repetitive behaviors. A major impediment to finding effective treatment regimens is the fact that individual responses to the same medicine can vary greatly due to genetic background. Finding the most effective dose with the fewest side effects means slowly trying various doses, and possibly having to switch medicines. This is not only a challenge for the physician, but is also a confounding factor in large-scale clinical trials that aim to determine the overall effectiveness of a medication.

5|25: Celebrating Five Years of Autism Science Day 23: Gastroenterology consensus recommendations provide recognition of the need for specialized approaches to GI problems in children with autism

February 23, 2010 1 comment

In honor of the anniversary of Autism Speaks’ founding on Feb 25, for the next 25 days we will be sharing stories about the many significant scientific advances that have occurred during our first five years together. Our 23rd item, Gastroenterology consensus recommendations provide recognition of the need for specialized approaches to GI problems in children with autism, is adapted from a 2009 press release. 

Gastrointestinal (GI) problems are a commonly expressed concern of parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but families have often found it difficult to find appropriate care for these issues. In December 2009, a consensus statement and recommendations for the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders in children with ASD were published in Pediatrics. These recommendations are an important step in advancing physician awareness of the unique challenges in the medical management of children with autism and will be a prelude towards the development of evidence-based guidelines that will standardize care for all children with ASD. The reports highlighted the crucial need for information to guide care, and emphasized the critical importance of fostering more research in this area, including genetic research, to support the development of these guidelines.

“The Pediatrics paper represents long-sought recognition by the mainstream medical community that treatment of GI problems in children with autism requires specific and specialized approaches,” reacted Dr. Dawson. “Autism Speaks has been actively engaged in the study of GI problems associated with children with autism, working toward enhanced medical community awareness for over five years through its research agenda and the Autism Speaks’ Autism Treatment Network (ATN). Dan Coury, M.D., ATN medical director, commented, “We are delighted to see the publication of important information that can support clinicians and caregivers in providing better care for children with autism, particularly with GI concerns, as parents unfortunately very often find it difficult to identify physicians who have an understanding of these issues and are able to provide appropriate medical care for their children. GI and pediatric specialists from six of the ATN sites participated in the forum and in the development of these recommendations, which shows the power of interaction among the communities and individuals dedicated to this problem. Autism Speaks is already engaged in the crucial next step which is to move beyond these consensus-based recommendations to develop evidence-based clinical guidelines.” In addition to development of evidence-based clinical guidelines for GI issues, the ATN is also currently working on evidence based clinical guidelines for medical management of sleep, and neurologic disorders associated with autism. “Delivery of evidence-based clinical guidelines will serve as excellent opportunities for future training and education of physicians,” added Dr. Dawson.

The consensus statement highlights several important themes, the first emphasizing that GI problems are a genuine concern in the ASD population and that these disorders exacerbate or contribute to problem behaviors. The need for awareness of how GI problems manifest in children with autism and the potential for accompanying nutritional complications and impaired quality of life were also emphasized.

In the second paper, the authors make consensus recommendations providing guidance on how current general pediatric standards of care that can and should be applied for children with ASD. George Fuchs, M.D., a co-author on the two papers and chair of the ATN GI Committee remarked, “The recommendations provide important guidance for the clinician to adapt the current practices of care (for abdominal pain, chronic constipation and gastroesophageal reflux) for the child with autism. The recommendations from the Autism Forum meeting complement the ATN’s on-going work to develop evidence-based, ASD-specific guidelines. The ATN is currently piloting newly created guidelines and monitoring their effectiveness. We anticipate this data will contribute to an evidence-based foundation to support best practices for GI problems in ASD.”

Autism Speaks is committed to the sustained support of efforts that address co-morbid medical conditions in the ASD population. In recognizing that there’s not enough evidence in any GI area and more research is needed, the Pediatric papers reaffirm the importance of the recent November 2009, Autism Speaks sponsored symposium and workshop on Gastrointestinal Disorders in Autism Spectrum Disorders. The symposium and workshop represented an important partnership with the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) – the largest professional society for GI and nutritional specialists, and a professional authority for the development and implementation of pediatric GI guidelines. The symposium raised awareness and provided the latest scientific information to an audience of 168 researchers, clinicians, and pediatric GI and nutrition specialists, most of whom had limited expertise in autism. The symposium was followed by a workshop that brought together a diverse group of experts in GI, nutrition, pediatrics, pain, ASD, and biological research. Recommendations were developed for an expanded and targeted research agenda for the field that will address current gaps in the knowledge base and aim to advance evaluation and treatment of ASD-GI disorders. Proceedings from the meeting are scheduled to be published in 2010. A unique and important element in both the Symposium and Workshop was the inclusion of parents of children with ASD.

Did you know?:  Autism Speaks’ Autism Treatment Network (ATN) is developing  evidence-based guidelines that will provide specific guidance to physicians on how to address a number of medical issues of concern for children with ASD.  The ATN is currently piloting a GI guideline algorithm (decision flow charts) for the assessment and treatment of constipation, and a sleep guideline algorithm for insomnia. The ATN is also working on guidelines in the areas of psychopharmacology and neurology. For more information on ATN guideline activities, please see www.autismspeaks.org/airp. 

5|25: Celebrating Five Years of Autism Science Day 22: Combined Therapies Hold Promise for More Effective Treatments

February 22, 2010 Leave a comment

In honor of the anniversary of Autism Speaks’ founding on Feb 25, for the next 25 days we will be sharing stories about the many significant scientific advances that have occurred during our first five years together. Our 22nd item, Combined Therapies Hold Promise for More Effective Treatments, is from Autism Speaks’ Top 10 Autism Research Events of 2009..

Just over three years ago the FDA’s landmark approval of risperidone for the treatment of ASD represented a significant breakthrough for the autism community. Since then other large-scale autism studies have sought FDA approval for drugs that target core or associated symptoms for autism, but unfortunately few of these trials have proven successful. In 2009, taking a cue from other disorders such as ADHD where a combined effect of both medication and behavioral therapies has proven fruitful, researchers published the first successful combined randomized controlled trial for ASD. The paper in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry demonstrated that combined pharmacological and behavioral treatments was more effective than pharmacological treatment alone for reducing challenging behaviors.

Risperidone is approved for reducing aggression and irritability in children and adolescents with autism. However, its use still presents a number of challenges to clinicians. Like other atypical anti-psychotics it can have adverse side effects including weight gain, potentially leading to increased risk for obesity, and GI symptoms such as diarrhea and constipation, which can already be problematic for children with ASD. Clinicians must therefore balance the benefit of treating the problem behaviors with the potential for creating new health challenges for the child. On the other hand, behavioral therapies have been shown to be one of the most reliably effective treatments for improving problem behaviors with limited side effects. Combination therapies create a synergistic therapeutic environment in which medication allows a child to get more from behavioral therapies and, at the same time, the benefits of behavioral therapy may mean lower doses of medication are required.

A new multi-site study by the Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology Autism Network, the same group that conducted the pivotal studies leading to the approval of risperidone, investigated whether combining risperidone treatments with a simultaneous behavioral intervention would be more effective than medication alone. Their 24-week study of 124 children ages 4-13, compared a treatment regime of risperidone alone with a combined treatment regimen of risperidone and a parent training program that followed the principles of applied behavioral analysis. While both the combined and medication-only treatments reduced the severity of non-compliant behaviors, the combined therapy resulted in a significantly greater reduction while using lower doses of risperidone. The combined therapy was also better at reducing other challenging behaviors, such as irritability and hyperactivity.

This study provides hope for a wider range of available treatments and greater flexibility for clinicians who should be encouraged to use combined approaches in cases where medications or behavioral interventions are not effective on their own. Confirming the effectiveness of coordinated treatments that take full advantage of the benefits of both pharmaceutical and behavioral approaches also demonstrates the continued need to support research establishing the most effective treatments in all realms. Finally, the vast majority of clinical trials conducted to date have only addressed how an individual treatment compares to a placebo. Very few studies have been conducted that make head-to-head comparisons of two or more treatments as was done here, so the success of this trial will also serve to highlight the utility of “comparative effectiveness trials” for determining the best treatments for ASD.

Did you know?: Autism Speaks’ funded Interactive Autism Network (IAN) is a web-based family registry and social network that brings together thousands of families with autism research and provides a forum for families to report information about their experiences.  In a recent study on over 5000 children in IAN, 35% of parents reported that their children were taking at least one psychotropic medicine and the use of these drugs increased with age.  The incidence of a comorbid condition such as seizures, ADHD or anxiety increased the likelihood of medication use.  The IAN authors also reported on correlations between insurance access and use of multiple medications, noting that those children using public insurance plans (such as Medicaid) tended to be on more medications, possibly due to an inability to get coverage for behavioral therapies.

5|25: Celebrating Five Years of Autism Science Day 14: Autism as a Disorder of the Synapse

February 14, 2010 Leave a comment

5|25: Celebrating Five Years of Autism Science Day 6: FDA Approval of Risperidone

February 6, 2010 Leave a comment

In honor of the anniversary of Autism Speaks’ founding on Feb 25, for the next 25 days we will be sharing stories about the many significant scientific advances that have occurred during our first five years together. Our sixth item, FDA Approval of Risperidone, is from Autism Speaks’ Top 10 Autism Research Events of 2007.

In late 2006 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first medication indicated to treat certain symptoms associated with autism, making 2007 the first year an approved drug for autism was available. The drug, risperidone sold under the brand name Risperdal, is manufactured and marketed by Janssen, L.P., a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson.

First introduced in 1993 as an atypical antipsychotic to treat schizophrenia, Risperdal can now be marketed as a treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder in children and adolescents aged 5-16 years. This includes symptoms of aggression towards others, deliberate self-injuriousness, temper tantrums and quickly changing moods. Importantly, Risperdal does not treat the core symptoms of autism such as communication problems and trouble with social interactions. However, J&J used two clinical trials to demonstrate the benefits of the drug in treating the associated behavioral disturbances that can interfere with school, learning and family life.

This event not only sets precedence for gaining FDA approval for medications that treat autistic symptoms, it also shows that autism is considered a viable market for the pharmaceutical industry which will hopefully lead to the development of new compounds that will benefit the quality of life for those living with autism.

Update since this story was first run: On November 20, 2009 the FDA approved Abilify (aripiprazole) for the treatment of irritability associated with autism, making it the second medication to receive an autism indication. Specifically, the drug is approved for children 6-17 to help alleviate symptoms of “aggression towards others, deliberate self-injuriousness, temper tantrums, and quickly changing moods.” Aripiprazole, which is manufactured and marketed as Abilify by Bristol-Myers Squibb, is an atypical antipsychotic medication used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. Although an FDA approval for a medication addressing the core symptoms of autism is still lacking, the approval of Abilify will offer additional options for families and clinicians.

5|25: Celebrating Five Years of Autism Science Day 3: Potential Reversal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

February 3, 2010 Leave a comment

In honor of the anniversary of Autism Speaks’ founding on Feb 25, for the next 25 days we will be sharing stories about the many significant scientific advances that have occurred during our first five years together. Our third item, Potential Reversal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, is from Autism Speaks’ Top 10 Autism Research Events of 2007.

2007 saw the publication of several studies that documented successful treatment of disease symptoms in mouse models of three different neurodevelopmental disorders related to autism. Most significantly, two of three (Fragile X and Rett) involved reversal of the phenotype AFTER the mice had already become sick, suggesting that developmental disorders such as autism may be treatable in adolescence or adulthood.

In February 2007, researchers in Scotland found that they could reverse the debilitating defects and certain death in mice carrying the Rett Syndrome gene, well after the mice had regressed into the most severe stages of disease. In July, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology used a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome to show that it was possible to reverse Fragile X and autistic symptoms after birth. Although the specific treatment approaches may not be directly applicable to an eventual autism treatment, the successful and entirely unexpected “rescue” of adult animals taught the world that so-called “developmental” disorders, those that begin in infancy, apparently still have a potential to be reversed later in life.

Given the behavioral overlap of these disorders with autism, even if the underlying disease-causing biological mechanisms are different, these results provided hope to scientists and families alike that we can (and will!) do the same for autism.

Update since this story was first run:  These experiments changed the mindset of scientists worldwide, serving as a proof-of-principle for the many researchers now searching for pharmacological methods to treat these and other animal models of neurodevelopmental disorders.  In a 2009 publication from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, researchers from MIT reported that a pharmacological treatment of the Rett syndrome mouse extended the lifespan of the animals and partially rescued a variety of symptoms, including irregular heart and breathing patterns.  Studies such as these are paving the way for future human clinical trials.

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