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Posts Tagged ‘World Autism Awareness Day’

Autism Speaks Kicks off “Light It Up Blue”

February 22, 2012 23 comments

In celebration of World Autism Awareness Day on April 2, Autism Speaks will again seek to turn the world blue. Our third annual Light It Up Blue initiative is fully underway with over 350 buildings already committed to turning blue.

Among the landmarks that will be turning blue on April 2, 2012 are Rockefeller Center, Top of the Rock Observation Deck and Madison Square Garden in New York City, Hôtel de Ville in Paris, France, the famous Tokyo Tower in Japan and Canada’s CN Tower, the Sydney Opera House in Australia and Michigan’s Mackinac Bridge.

Check out LightItUpBlue.org to register your events and see a full list of participating buildings.

Last year we had over 2000 buildings and landmarks turn blue. With your help, in 2012 we will more than double that number!!

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Autism Speaks U “Light It Up Blue” LIVE Q&A Transcript

February 17, 2012 2 comments

On Thursday, February 16, our Autism Speaks U team hosted a LIVE Facebook Q&A for college students across the country. We discussed Light It Up Blue, World Autism Awareness Day, awareness/fundraising event ideas and shared links to awareness and promotions resources. If you were unable to join,  read below for the full transcript. Visit www.AutismSpeaks.org/U for more information.

4:59
Hi everyone, thanks for joining our LIVE Q&A! We’ll begin in 2 minutes.
5:02
This Q&A is intended for college students, faculty and staff.
5:02
It is text only – you’ll interact with us via the live chat client that you are logged into now. When you submit a question or comment there will be a delay from when it appears on the chat client.
5:03
Moderating this Q&A will be Sarah Caminker and Jaclyn Renner from Autism Speaks U.
5:03
Let’s do a roll call, so we know the schools that are being represented.Enter your school name and if you’re an undergrad, grad or staff.
5:03
Comment From Amanda

NYU

5:03
Comment From Theresa

SUNY Albany- undergrad

5:03
Comment From Rosalie

Seattle Pacific University, undergrad of psychology department

5:04
Comment From John

National Univ. San Diego

5:04
Comment From Elisse Bachman

Elisse Bachman, Graduate Student (’13): Bloomsburg Univ of PA (Bloomsburg, PA)

5:04
Comment From Guest

Liberty University – Undergrad

5:04
Comment From sharon moreno

VCU, Richmond, VA – parent of undergrad

5:04
Comment From Jessica

Appalachian State – undergraduate

5:04
Comment From Guest

University of Texas at Austin – undergrad

5:04
Comment From Guest

San Joaquin Delta College undergrade in early child development

5:05
Comment From Rob and LK @ Gettysburg

Co-founders and -presidents of Autism Speaks U Gettysburg College

5:05
Comment From Lori – staff

Bridgewater State University, MA

5:06
Comment From Aspen

Arizona State University Undergrad

5:06
Comment From Susan

Remington College of Nursing, faculty

5:06
Comment From Guest

Smith College, undergrad

5:06
Looks like we have a diverse group here! If anyone comes on later, please post your name and school.
5:07
Comment From Brookie

Meredith College Raleigh NC

5:07
Comment From Katrina Mesina

Chicago Autism Speaks Office

5:07
For those new to Autism Speaks U, it is a program that supports students who
-host awareness, advocacy and fundraising events
-start chapters
-become campus ambassadors.We have 50 official Autism Speaks U Chapters across the country and work with hundreds of students who host events!
5:07
Get more information at www.AutismSpeaks.org/U or email sarah.caminker@autismspeaks.org
5:07
This Q&A will include the following:
-Explanation of Light It Up Blue & World Autism Awareness Day.
-Overview of how to get your campus to participate.
-Event ideas and links to resources.
-Question and answer session.
5:08
Before we dive into our first topic, we’d like to ask….
5:08
Did you know that Monday, April 2 is Light It Up Blue and World Autism Awareness Day?
Yes: ( 73% )

No: ( 27% )

5:09
Thanks for the feedback.For those who answered no, Light It Up Blue is Autism Speaks 3rd annual awareness campaign, where iconic buildings, landmarks and schools across the world are asked to change their lights from white to blue on April 2nd in Honor of United Nations-sanctioned World Autism Awareness Day.
5:09
April 2nd also kicks off Autism Awareness Month which is all throughout April.
5:09
So what does this mean?April 2nd is a BIG deal, and we need your help to turn everything blue!
5:09
Last year, 150 colleges and universities across the country participated in Light It Up Blue by illuminating a building or structure or by hosting events on campus.
5:10
Did your school light it up blue last year?
Yes: ( 11% )

No: ( 89% )

5:10
Here are few images of buildings that went blue in 2011
5:10

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UConn’s Wilbur Cross Building.
5:11

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UC Berkeley’s Campanile
5:11

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Colgate University’s campus chapel.
5:11

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Case Western Reserve University’s Peter B. Lewis building.
5:11

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The Great Buddah at Hyogo in Kobe, Japan. – We know it’s not a school, but this is one of our favorite pictures!
5:12
Other incredible monuments that lit it up blue last year include the Empire State Building, Niagara Falls, Sydney Opera House, Christ the Redeemer Statue, Tokyo Tower and more!
5:12
A new question for everyone…..please vote!
5:12
Is your school planning to light up a building/monument blue this year?
Yes: ( 48% )

No: ( 52% )

5:13
If you answered no, here are 5 easy ways to get your school to participate in Light It Up Blue.
5:13
1. Decide what building you want to light up blue. Determine this BEFORE you ask your school to participate, so you’re prepared when meeting with faculty and staff.
5:13
2. Contact your school’s President and Student Activities Director to ask them to participate. Do this via email or by making an in-person appointment.
5:13
Download a sample letter template that you can modify and send to your school athttp://bit.ly/liubletter.
5:14
3. See if there’s an Autism Speaks U chapter (http://bit.ly/chapterlist) or one of our national philanthropic partners (Αlpha Xi Delta http://bit.ly/azdlistings & Theta Delta Chihttp://bit.ly/tdxcharges) at your school. If so, contact them and work together!
5:14
4. Ask different academic department heads (Psychology, Education, Communication, Speech & Hearing, etc.) to work with you and the school administration to light up your campus blue.
5:15
5. Explain to your school WHY it is important to Light It Up Blue.
5:15
For example, 1 in 110 individuals are on the spectrum and a new case is diagnosed every 15 minutes. All the more reason to educate your campus about this prevalent disability.
5:16
Your campus will also be aligning themselves with prestigious schools, such as Cornell University, Johns Hopkins University, Northwestern, UC Berkeley and Penn State who lit up their campuses blue last year.
5:16
Now….HOW do you actually light up the building blue? There are 2 ways.
5:16
1. The school purchases blue bulbs from a hardware and lighting supply stores and replaces the white bulbs with blue ones.
5:17
Contact your school’s facilities manager for specific details on what type of lights you will need.
5:17
2. Place gels, filters or blue cellophane over the existing lights. These can be purchased from a local lighting supply store.
5:18
A few tips about the gels/filters…
5:18
If the installed lights are very bright white light, then it is recommended to use Roscolux #80 Primary Blue.If the lights have a medium intensity or the surface isn’t highly reflective, use Roscolux #68 Sky Blue.
5:18
The school’s facilities manager will be able to discuss this in more detail, but it’s helpful to have this information on hand.
5:18
If unable to light up a building blue there are other ways to have your school participate.
5:19
If there is an electronic marquee on your campus ask them to display the Light It Up Blue logo and announce that it is World Autism Awareness Day.
5:19

5:19
Encourage students, faculty and staff to all wear blue on April 2, or on another designated day in April. Gather everyone together, take a picture and send it to us!
5:19

5:20
Get a banner hung cross campus or near student housing to let everyone know that it’s World Autism Awareness Day.
5:20

5:20
Does your school have a well-known statue, monument or mascot? If so, decorate it with Autism Speaks U banners, gear and blue balloons!
5:20

5:20
Deck out the campus in blue. See how one school got approval to paint their campus’ tunnel.
5:21

5:21
There are SO many different ways to light up your campus blue! Be creative, think outside the box and don’t forget to send us pictures!
5:22
Now for a QUESTION….please submit a response
5:22
What building(s) or monuments are you planning to light up blue?
5:22
Comment From Caitlyn

The student center

5:22
Comment From Guest

Library, student center, and quad

5:23
Comment From Guest

Dorms

5:23
Comment From Lori – staff

I would love for the University to light up the main administrative building ~ Boyden Hall.

5:23
Comment From Rosalie

Demaray Hall Clocktower

5:23
Comment From Jessica

Mascot statue and our university’s main sign

5:23
Comment From Kimberly

Hey something I haven’t seen … let’s try and get towns or cities lite up blue that day

5:23
Comment From Rob and LK @ Gettysburg

Our main historic Building, Penn hall

5:24
Comment From Guest

I would like to light up College Hall here at Smith College, MA. It is very visible.

5:24
Comment From Theresa

I requested my school to light of the University Hall which is the first building you would see if you walked onto campus or the Campus Center

5:24
Comment From Kasia

We have a building that is a historic building here that just got new led lights so the building is always lit up and they can make them change different colors.

5:24
Comment From Susan

Will encourage everyone to wear blue April 2nd

5:24
Comment From Guest

Main building

5:24
Comment From Jasmine

The preschool I work for, the quad at the college and my house!

5:24
Comment From Kasia

Possibly our Mountaineer statue as well

5:24
Comment From Theresa

University Hall or the Campus Center

5:25
Comment From Guest

We are planning on having a block party on April 2nd. We’ll be having blue bracelets that light up, so we can do a countdown for sunset and have students light theirs up then.

5:25
Comment From Mike

We’re lighting up all the dinning halls on campus blue

5:26
Comment From Brooklyn at ISU
I love that block party idea
5:26
In addition to lighting up a building blue, host an event on April 2, or throughout the month of April!
5:26
To start, download our Light It Up Blue cards at http://bit.ly/liubcards.
5:26

5:27
Print these out and distribute the cards outside the buildings that are lit blue. They are a great way to raise awareness!FYI….we’ll be listing all available materials in a few minutes.
5:27
Event ideas can include, but are not limited to:
5:27
Bake sales
Autism Speaks wristband sale
Blue cupcake eating contest
Walk/run
5:27
Blue hair extensions booth
Spare change campaign
Zumbathon
T-shirt sales
Blue flower sale
5:28
One of our favorites….a blue cake pop fundraiser!
5:28

5:28
They’re easy to make and a big hit. Download the cake pop recipe at http://bit.ly/bluecakepops.
5:29
Or try a puzzle piece campaign.
5:29

5:29
Set up a table on campus and sell puzzle piece cards to students, faculty and staff. Whoever purchases the card, signs his/her name and display the cards in your Student Center.
5:30
Attach fact cards to blue flowers and sell them on campus throughout April. It’s a great way to raise awareness and brighten someone’s day.
5:30

5:31
For more event suggestions, download our “A through Z Event Ideas” guide athttp://bit.ly/q4Ex0w.
5:33
Another QUESTION for everyone….what awareness and fundraising events are you planning for Light It Up Blue & World Autism Awareness Day?
5:34
Don’t be shy….what events are you planning on April 2nd?
5:34
Comment From Rob and LK @ Gettysburg

trying to get the entire campus to wear blue, trying to light up a couple buildings, facts will be written throughout the ground in crayon, and we will be passin out info cards as well as wrapping trees up in blue tape

5:35
Comment From Mike

We’re having an all blue relay race on campus. $20 a team to register. The team with the most creative uniform wins a gift card which was donated.

5:35
Comment From Guest

We are getting shops around the university to post facts, make donations, and decorate their stores blue throughout the month of April.

5:35
Comment From Caitlyn

I was thinking a run/walk race and if that wasn’t possible an Autism Awareness BINGO night where the prizes would be blue

5:35
Comment From Jasmine

I plan on baking blue treats, cupcakes, cookies, cakepops and getting crafty by making blue flower headbands. Also, I plan on wearing blue as much as possible through out April! My 4 yr old son has autism and he makes my whole world a better place!

5:35
Comment From Lori – staff

My hope/plan is to get the involvement started at my campus! I love the ideas people are posting though!!

5:36
Comment From Susan

Blue Sidewalk chalk might be cool

5:36
Comment From Anna

We’re setting up a blue hair extension booth from April 2-6 on campus.

5:36
Comment From Lakesha

A scavenger hunt using puzzle pieces as clue cards, having students and faculty wear blue and having a walk.

5:36
Comment From Theresa

Aside from having a building lit up blue, we are trying to get everyone to wear blue and I was having trouble coming up with an idea but I really love the idea of the cake pop fundraiser attached to fact cards. And Sunday April 1st is our walk.

5:37
Comment From Caitlyn

Also I was thinking of painting a bunch of puzzles blue and hiding the pieces around our student center and the library and the person with the most pieces got a prize

5:37
Comment From Vicky Cid

we will be wrapping trees in blue ribbon, posting fact puzzle pieces into the ground with stakes, chalking facts onto the ground, lighting up a building blue, teaming up with our student body to hold awareness events like a blueberry pie eating contest, trivia bowl, etc… and teaming up with a local bar to raise funds

5:37
Comment From Rosalie

Will try to light up the buidling, blue ribbons around trees, mass emails to student to wear blue, and a fundraiser

5:38
Comment From Kasia

We are celebrating the entire week. We’re going to get a banner and have people sign but I’m liking the puzzle piece campaign better. Selling blue or puzzle piece printed ribbon. Selling wristbands. Giving out prizes to people we see wearing blue in support. Try to do a walk and have a game night. Having a guest speaker. On the 2nd we are also having a party (if the weather is nice) out by the building that we are lighting up blue.

5:38
Comment From Jasmine

My house will be decorated with Light It Up Blue and blue decor inside and out!

5:39
Comment From Michelle

We’re having a powder-puff football game with a few different sororities on campus. All the funds raised go to Autism Speaks! We’re getting the Greek Council & Student Government Assoc. to encourage everyone to attend.

5:39
All awesome ideas! There is one GREAT way to promote your events and that is through texting.
5:39
How many emails do you open? 1 out of every 10.How many text do you open? ALL
5:40
Send a text to 10 people. Include the event info. and ask them to forward the text on to 10 of their friends.
5:40
Create a text messaging campaign to increase attendance and funds raised!
5:41
Comment From Will

That’s a great idea! I never thought of that.

5:41
We’re excited for all you have planned.
5:41
Please remember to send pictures to autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org of your events and campus lit up blue!FYI, since photos tend to be large, only send one photo per email.
5:42
Once your event is confirmed, we’ll send out awareness materials and a banner. Email autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org your name, mailing address, event name/time/date/location.
5:42
A few additional tips….
5:42
1. Distribute awareness materials outside the building being lit up, so students connect the color blue to autism and Autism Speaks U.
5:42
2. Remember to take pictures! Contact your school’s newspaper or photography club and ask them take a high resolution picture of the building being lit blue and of your events.
We promote all of the schools that we receive pictures from.
5:43
3. Don’t start from scratch…use our promotional materials to get the word out!
5:43
Click the links below to download the items and print them off.
5:44
Side note: We’ll be posting the transcript from this Q&A later on the Autism Speaks U Facebook (www.facebook.com/autismspeaksu), so you’ll be able to access the links again.
5:44
Customizable Light It Up Blue Posters
• 8.5 x 11 poster- http://bit.ly/liubposter1
• 11 x 17 poster- http://bit.ly/liubposter2
5:44
•How To: Light It Up Blue Flyer- http://bit.ly/liubflyer
• This offers ideas for how you can get your campus involved.
5:44
Light It Up Blue Fact Cards – http://bit.ly/liubcards
5:45
These cards were just made for Autism Speaks U & Light It Up Blue, so use them!
5:45
Autism Speaks U Quarter Cards – http://bit.ly/quartercards
5:45
Fact & School Cards – http://bit.ly/vefknD
5:45
Autism Speaks U Handout – http://bit.ly/xfp6fq
5:46
Remember to email autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org when your school CONFIRMS what building will be lit up and/or you have a confirmed event planned for Light It Up Blue.
5:47
We promote all the schools that participate in Light It Up Blue and want to include your campus!
5:47
We have a few minutes left, and wanted to take one more poll, before we open it up to questions.
5:47
Do you prefer attending a monthly Facebook Q&A or would you rather have a monthly conference call?
Conference call: ( 11% )

Facebook Q&A: ( 89% )

5:49
Good to know that we all love Facebook!
5:49
Now, please ask any questions about what was discussed or about the Autism Speaks U program.
5:50
We’ll share these questions, so everyone can learn from each other. If you have tips/suggestions please provide those as well.
5:50
Comment From Kim

If I’m having trouble getting my school to Light It Up Blue, who should I contact?

5:50
Kim, please contact your school’s president and/or student activities director. Download a sample letter template that you can modify and send to your school at http://bit.ly/liubletter.
5:51
Comment From Mojdeh

How long does it take to start an Autism Speaks U chapter?

5:51
Mojdeh, it can take some students 1-2 months, while 6 months+ for others. It depends on your school’s process, and if you finish all the required Autism Speaks U paperwork.
5:51
Comment From Isabel

If we’re having an event can we use the Autism Speaks U logo on our flyer?

5:52
We have a specific Autism Speaks U logo that is used for people hosting events. Please email jaclyn.renner@autismspeaks.org, explain your event and we’ll provide the correct logo.
5:53
We do ask that you submit a proof to us of ALL items using the Autism Speaks U logo before it gets printed/distributed.
5:53
Comment From John

To Kim, I have found that getting the Local TV station involved can sometimes push things in the right direction.. Be Nice…

5:53
Comment From Lakesha

I am having trouble getting my school to light it up. The presidents secretary is not letting us get through, and other faculty are not showing up to meetings we have scheduled to talk about plans

5:54
We have had students email the school President directly and explain WHY it is important to light it up blue. Explain to them what this day/campaign means. You can also CC other school administration on the email, so they are appear about it as well.
5:54
Comment From Jasmine

If I host an Autism Awareness/Light It Up Blue party at my house, will you still be willing to send banners and additional materials?

5:55
Absolutely! Email us the details.
5:55
Comment From Kasia

As far as selling t-shirts are we allowed to sell the shirts from the website or does it have to be designed that we created to sell?

5:56
You can sell shirts from the website or from other places that you purchased them. Completely up to you!
5:56
Comment From Kim

John- That’s a great idea. I was thinking of contact our school and local news paper and TV station to see if they would publicize what we’re trying to do.

5:56
Comment From Mojdeh

How to you go about getting sponsors for events? My school has said that once my chapter is approved I am given $200 for the year.

5:58
Contact local businesses, restaurants, shops, etc. Stop by stores close to campus and explain to them what a sponsor for your event/chapter would entail.
5:58
Access our sponsorship guide at http://bit.ly/o2REod.
5:58
It’s a great resource!
5:59
We’re just about out of time. Thank all of you for participating in our Q&A!
5:59
It’s fantastic to see college students so involved in raising awareness and advocating for the autism community.
5:59
Remember to check out www.AutismSpeaks.org/U for more information!
5:59
If we didn’t get to your question or you have a few more, email us at autismspeaksu@autismspeaks.org.
6:00
Thanks, and have a great night!

U.N. Postage Stamp to Honor World Autism Awareness Day

October 24, 2011 14 comments

Hey everyone! We have a really exciting opportunity to celebrate World Autism Awareness Day, and we need your help!

The United Nations is looking to feature artwork, by an individual on the autism spectrum, for a special 2012 Autism Awareness stamp. All you need to do is upload your artwork to a special album on Facebook to be in the running! Remember, your art will be on a postage stamp, so the artwork has to look good on a small scale!

The deadline is November 4, 2011 – so get your submissions in! Use your imagination and be creative, the design is totally up to you!

You can upload your photos to our Facebook Wall!  Please be sure to copy and paste the link underneath!

A Letter From Denmark

August 4, 2011 2 comments

This photo post was submitted by Camilla to our Flickr page all the way from Denmark during the Light It Up Blue Campaign.

Hello,

Thank you for being on Facebook and thank you for letting me share my picture of my wonderful son.

My son was diagnosed four weeks ago, infantile autism/ADHD and Verbal Tics. I love him to death and there is nothing I wouldn’t do for him. My battle of having someone to listen to me and help me, to figure out,why “normal” books about bringing up a child never worked. I had to invent a million other ways, trial and error,  to connect and finally, four weeks ago this ended.

To be told, that the last almost 11 years, was not me being a silly, first time mother, who since the day he was born, felt that there was something that was not as it was supposed to be, really was harder than I thought it would be. But at least now we have a diagnosis. We can only do even better from here on and help my son to improve in so many ways. My son is very lucky, that he also is very, very smart, which will help him a lot now when we are to learn the “how to’s” for so many things.

I am blessed, and I thank you guys for having a Facebook page. I have been reading a lot of articles posted by you, which have been very helpful in this early process of taking the news and dealing. But also to help me and my son to move forward and to learn from others’ experiences.

Here is a picture of me and my son, taken last year, and I really hope the White House, will show it’s true blue colors April 2 2012.

Thank you!

Best regards,
Camilla and Linus (from Denmark)

“In Their Own Words” is a series within the Autism Speaks blog which shares the voices of people who have autism, as well as their loved ones. If you have a story you wish to share about your personal experience with autism, please send it to editors@autismspeaks.org. Autism Speaks reserves the right to edit contributions for space, style and content. Because of the volume of submissions, not all can be published on the site.

Autism Speaks Goes to Bangladesh

July 21, 2011 14 comments

Posted by Andy Shih, Ph.D., vice president of scientific affairs for Autism Speaks

Saima Hossain almost always has a smile on her face. It’s there when she juggles the demands of her four adorable children. It was there when she confessed to being nervous before her speech at the United Nations. She even smiled when she asked me, half seriously, “What have you gotten me into?”

It seems the only time Saima doesn’t smile is when she is talking about autism. A licensed school psychologist, Saima knows that the daily struggle of those touched by autism is no laughing matter. When she talks about autism, she is thoughtful and knowledgeable, and her passion to make a difference is palpable. “I see this as my life’s work,” she told me.

 Saima Hossain addresses UN diplomats and guests on World Autism Awareness Day 2011

I first met Saima, the daughter of the Prime Minister of Bangladesh, two years ago at a World Autism Awareness Day event that Autism Speaks hosted here in New York. I was impressed with her poise and passion even then. But I didn’t get a chance to speak with her at length until last September when Autism Speaks hosted its annual “World Focus on Autism” event to raise awareness among world leaders converging for the UN General Assembly.

We talked about the challenges that individuals and families affected by autism face in Bangladesh, a poor country of over 162 million people in Southeast Asia. Saima conveyed her deep desire to make a difference in the lives of Bangladeshi children as well as all children who struggle with autism. At the end of our long conversation, we agreed to explore bringing our Global Autism Public Health (GAPH) initiative to Southeast Asia.

I can tell you that our collaboration with Saima has already reaped great rewards for Autism Speaks and the families we serve. For example, with Saima’s help, Autism Speaks and Bangladesh’s Permanent Mission recently co-hosted a UN celebration of World Autism Awareness Day. The many world diplomats attending included UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon. He and other influential guests expressed their solidarity with our cause and listened to a panel of experts and advocates (including Saima) who eloquently explained how international collaboration will speed the answers we need to help all who struggle with autism—including families here in North America.

Next week, I will travel to Dhaka, Bangladesh, with Dana Marnane, Autism Speaks’ vice president of awareness and events, and Michael Rosanoff, associate director of public health research. There we will participate in the launch of GAPH-Bangladesh and co-host a conference — “Autism Spectrum Disorders and Developmental Disabilities in Bangladesh and South Asia” — together with the Bangladesh government, the Centre for Neurodevelopment & Autism in Children (Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University), the World Health Organization (WHO), and WHO’s South East Asian Regional Office (SEARO).

Our goal is to boost regional awareness and advocacy for individuals and families touched by autism. We will be joined in this effort by Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina Wazed and her ministers as well as regional dignitaries including Indian National Congress President Sonia Gandhi, the First Lady of Sri Lanka Madam Shiranthi Rajapaksa, and the Second Lady of the Maldives Madam Ilham Hussain — all of whom have expressed their desire to learn more about autism and explore how they can collaborate with each other and Autism Speaks.

Michael and I have been in daily contact with Saima in the past two weeks, and her team in Dhaka has been amazing. We’re awed to see this tremendous endeavor take shape, gain momentum, and become one of the region’s most anticipated events. We know this is the beginning of much hard work, even as it is giving us and the autism community of Bangladesh and South Asia a sense of pride and hope for tomorrow.

For news coverage of the ‘Autism Spectrum Disorders and Developmental Disabilities in Bangladesh and South Asia’ Conference, visit here.

 

A Sister Reflects on World Autism Awareness Month

April 28, 2011 26 comments

This is a guest blog post by Ali Dyer, the Social Media Coordinator at Autism Speaks. Her older brother Jeff has autism. 

April 2011, World Autism Awareness Month, has been one of the most memorable times in my life. The last few weeks I have taken part in some unbelievable ‘Light It Up Blue‘ events, met amazing people, and connected with the worldwide community to commemorate World Autism Awareness Month. April was comprised of so many moving parts that came together seamlessly, due to the hard work of so many.

I have been meaning to write a blog post, but I keep hitting walls.

Sure, I drafted a post of my experiences on April 1 and 2, detailing some of my stops: The Today Show with Alpha Xi Delta; WPIX 11 with the incredible students from Pelham; The New York Stock Exchange with our Co-Founders Mr. and Mrs. Wright, state dignitaries, politicians, celebrities and many more prominent people in the autism community. I could write about the reception hosted by ‘Light It Up Blue Rockland,’ in my hometown, when my brother and his housemates were in attendance. I was so proud. Or, the press conference at the Intrepid, which took place on a beautiful Saturday morning.

Throughout this campaign, I communicated with literally thousands of people all over the world. I feel blessed and privileged to have heard their stories and seen their photos. While I worry that I will never be able to formulate the right words to give World Autism Awareness Month justice it deserves, here are some photos that will speak for me:

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I can’t forget to include the panel discussion, ‘Solving the Autism Public Health Puzzle: Regional and International Collaboration,’ held at the United Nations, or ‘A Blue Affair’ hosted by Donald Trump Jr. and his wife, Vanessa.

We should also revisit the push to ‘Light The White House Blue.’ I am in awe of each person who submitted a blog entry. More than 1,000 comments were posted and much of the autism community was unified for a common goal.

On April 25, my dear friend Jess, who so bravely and unselfishly shares her beautiful family with us on A Diary of a Mom, was invited to The White House for an event to commemorate Autism Awareness Month. The morning before she headed over to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Jess told me that she would be taking my brother Jeff with her. My heart was full. I couldn’t think of anyone better to represent him. She gives all of those affected by autism the utmost respect and genuine compassion. I will never be able to thank her enough.

However, alongside all of these spectacular and unique moments, the most memorable for me happened on probably the most mundane of all days.

On April 3, once we all were coming down off the Light It Up Blue ‘high,’ my brother came home from his residential house, and I snapped back to reality. We took a walk, as we have done countless times before. My mom, brother, and I have been taking Sunday walks for years, making it almost an institution. We go to different locations, but often find ourselves on the wooded path at the Pearl River Middle School, as we did that day. We are shielded by the trees and find comfort in the trail’s predictable twists and turns.

Before we begin, Jeff’s anxiety kicks in and he asks for a rundown of dates, “Yes, Jeff, next weekend you can order two DVDs off Amazon, in June 2011 we will go to Montauk for a week, in 2014 we will remodel the kitchen …” and so it goes. Then, we are swallowed by the woods, where Jeffery will usually stroll a few steps behind making his noises. My mom and I will smile and greet friendly strangers; some give us knowing and warm looks, while others sort of stare.

As we round the first bend, which borders a putting green at the local golf course, we remind Jeff to quiet down. As per usual, he gets louder, and we laugh. Next, there is a downturn that Jeff always heads down gingerly. He approaches this dip with the caution he exhibits in some everyday activities. If there are any disruptions along the way (fallen tree, broken bridge, mud puddles, etc.), Jeff always takes note – I am positive he remembers every element of the trail from the first day he stepped foot there, over twenty years ago.

We plod along, stopping from time to time to chat about dates. He’ll hold our hands, then jog ahead, or maybe he’ll stop to give us a hug. My mom and I don’t mind – as a matter of fact, we’d have it no other way.

The last leg has a steep uphill that my mom and I sort of dread. Each time, Jeff manages to surge, making it to the top with a smile. He takes on the hill with gusto and courage. This trail reminds me of the journey my family is on. There are times we are slow and anxious, while other times we coast through and laugh. We have down-slopes and upturns, but Jeff always keeps our pace and establishes a rhythm. It may have taken him a little longer through the years, but he has become our fearless leader. Jeff holds us up with his unconditional love and directs us with his strength.

My brother, like the countless members of our community, is brave.

World Autism Awareness Month 2011 has given me a greater sense of community. Together, we will make the world a safer and more welcoming place for my brother, and all of those with autism spectrum disorders. I have a renewed hope, and will be forever changed.

I would like to send a big thank you to each and every person in the autism community.

Me and Jeff on the trail - photo by Carol Dyer





etnies Celebrates World Autism Awareness Day

April 7, 2011 2 comments

On April 2, World Autism Awareness Day, etnies, Autism Speaks and the A.skate Foundation held a day of free skate clinics for kids on the autism spectrum at the etnies Skatepark of Lake Forest, Calif. With the help of more than 40 volunteers, including etnies team riders Jose Rojo, Kyle Leeper, Devine Calloway, Kyle Loza, Nathan Williams and Ashley Charles, 80 children with autism of all ages were provided with one-on-one skateboarding lessons, which serve as a unique social outlet for kids who often struggle with social interaction. Check out the etnies blog for more video and read coverage of the the event from Transworld Skateboarding and LakeForestPatch.

Here are some photos from the event!


Video Footage!

World Autism Awareness Day at Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum

April 3, 2011 2 comments

The Intrepid played host this morning to a press conference and family event for those affected by autism. Children from Pelham Middle School joined children with autism from schools around NYC and N.J. to celebrate WAAD on April 2. Owen Saunders, a student at Pelham Middle School, created the song Light It Up Blue and got his classmates to sing it. Autism Speaks recorded the kids singing the song and created a video that has gone viral around the world! The father of a child with autism in Argentina translated the song into Spanish and it is being sung in Spain and Argentina to celebrate WAAD today.

The students sang their heart-warming song today to an audience that included guest speakers Suzanne and Bob Wright – who were joined by the children and grandchildren, Senator Robert Menendez (NJ), and the president of the Intrepid Susan Marenoff-Zausner. They received a standing ovation at the conclusion of their performance. Plus visit the Pix 11 blog to see the students’ performance from April 1.

Guests and Intrepid visitors were also able to try out Autism Speaks brand new interactive awareness ad created by BBDO with the Ad Council. The display invites people to try to make eye contact with a young girl on the screen to demonstrate an early warning sign of autism.

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Empire State Building Lights Up Blue

April 1, 2011 10 comments

On April 1,  Autism Speaks volunteers and supporters went the Empire State Building to flip the ceremonial switch to turn the building’s lights blue for the second year in a row. Bob and Suzanne Wright greeted the crowd and spoke about the over 1000 buildings around the world that are turning blue tonight in celebration of the fourth annual World Autism Awareness Day. They were joined by Emil Jensen Perez, a young man with autism who asked the Empire State Building to light blue for autism in 2008. Emil’s family are top walkers in the Westchester Walk Now for Autism Speaks. In addition, Grammy Award-winning singer and mother of a 9 year old boy with autism Toni Braxton greeted the crowd and shared her story of when her son was diagnosed.

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Presidential Proclamation – World Autism Awareness Day

April 1, 2011 19 comments

WORLD AUTISM AWARENESS DAY, 2011

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

With autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affecting nearly one percent of children in the United States, autism is an urgent public health issue with a profound impact on millions of Americans. World Autism Awareness Day is an opportunity to recognize the contributions of individuals with ASDs and rededicate ourselves to the cause of understanding and responding to autism.

Men and women on the autism spectrum have thrived and excelled in communities across America and around the world. Yet, despite great progress in understanding ASDs, challenges remain for these individuals and their loved ones. For too long, the needs of people living with autism and their families have gone without adequate support and understanding. While we continue to encourage the development of resources for children on the autism spectrum and provide necessary resources for their families, we must also remember that young people with ASDs become adults with ASDs who deserve our support, our respect, and the opportunity to realize their highest aspirations.

As our understanding of the autism spectrum grows, my Administration remains dedicated to supporting children and adults impacted by autism. Led by the Department of Health and Human Services, we have expanded investments in autism research, public health tracking, early detection, and services — from early intervention for children to improved long-term services and support programs for adults. My Administration maintains a firm commitment to advance autism research and treatment, as well as promote education, employment, and equality for all individuals with autism, from early childhood through employment and community life. We will continue to work with the Congress, experts, and families to improve Federal and State programs that assist individuals with ASDs and their families and to bolster the impact and reach of community support and services. I encourage all Americans to visit http://www.HHS.gov/autism for more information and resources on ASDs.

With each breakthrough in research and each innovative treatment, we open endless possibilities for the many American families who have been touched by autism. As we mark World Autism Awareness Day, let us recommit to improving the lives of individuals and families impacted by ASDs and creating a world free from discrimination where all can achieve their fullest potential.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 2 of each year as World Autism Awareness Day. I call upon the people of the United States to learn more about autism and what they can do to support individuals on the autism spectrum and their families.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.

BARACK OBAMA

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